Things that bug you in the hobby

mantisfan101

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You give your whipscorpion a bunch of dirt that you decided to spend your last bits of your allowance on.
He spends the whole day lounging around the top, looking for the water dish.

You buy a ton of crickets in advance and try giving it to your vinnies but they refuse to eat it since they’re apparently “too jumpy.”
You toss in a piece of dog food to get rid of all the mites but they decided to eat that instead and smear it across the entire enclosure, providing more food for the mites.
 

SonsofArachne

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Dec 10, 2017
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For me, its when people find out I have 8 tarantulas and all of a sudden I'm an "animal hoarder" or a "crazy spider lady"
Try telling them you have 94 :eek::confused::wideyed::anxious::astonished:. I'm actually amused by the looks I get, but then I don't really care what the know-nothings think.
 

weibkreux

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Feb 26, 2018
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The "kill it with fire" brigade.
Spiders catch roaches in their homes and other insects that are harmful to humans only to be thanked with fire. :(
For me, its when people find out I have 8 tarantulas and all of a sudden I'm an "animal hoarder" or a "crazy spider lady"
I told them I have around 50 and they ask how big is the box I'm using to store them all. Just answered that I don't want to start an MMA king-of-the-hill tarantula style. :rofl:
 

Rigor Mortis

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I'll add to this, it seems that there are quite a few that are very inexperienced with T's who rush to be the first to answer questions and nitpick every enclosure and care detail. If you've only been in the hobby for a year or two, no amount of reading or viewing video's can substitute for actual experience.
I was super guilty of this for awhile, I try to take a backseat now because I barely know anything that could be considered helpful. Unless its a new keeper asking for species suggestions, then I will always pipe in suggesting A. chalcodes. :troll:
 

MintyWood826

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I'll add to this, it seems that there are quite a few that are very inexperienced with T's who rush to be the first to answer questions and nitpick every enclosure and care detail. If you've only been in the hobby for a year or two, no amount of reading or viewing video's can substitute for actual experience.
I try to curb it :embarrassed:
 

SonsofArachne

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I mentioned this in another thread but I've noticed some less experienced keepers will have a list of T's they want and they're all rare/obscure (expensive) species. Getting some experience with some of the many wonderful established species first would probably be a good idea. I'm starting to think they believe it's a status thing to have the most obscure species they can find.
 
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Andrea82

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I mentioned this in another thread but I've noticed some less experienced keepers will have a list of T's they want and they're all rare/obscure (expensive) species. Getting some experience with some the many wonderful established species first would probably be a good idea. I'm starting to think they believe it's a status thing to have the most obscure species they can find.
It's a thing that occurs in every hobby, I think. People want the most unique/weird/expensive/hard to get element there is.
In mantis keeping, new keepers rarely want the bulletproof and fun Hierodula membranacea, they want the extremely sensitive and fussy Idolomantis diabolica.
I guess it's a form of competition, like always wanting the car that is better than the one your neighbour has.
 

SonsofArachne

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I guess it's a form of competition, like always wanting the car that is better than the one your neighbour has.
I agree, unfortunately this trend can lead to the death of rare T's that would be better off in the hands of more experienced keepers.
 
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MintyWood826

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Considering large species automatically better than dwarf species because of their size.
 
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Greasylake

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I guess it's a form of competition, like always wanting the car that is better than the one your neighbour has.
I've never understood why people buy cars to impress other people. If you're going to buy a car it should be because it's a car you're genuinely going to enjoy, whether or not anyone is impressed by it should be secondary. That logic could be applied to a lot of things really.
 

Death Derp

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Mar 24, 2018
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when I tell someone arachnophobic a that i have T's, they just get really surprised and tell me that they escape at night and kill people for some reason. I heard this many times and when I tell them it's false, they get really defensive over it. :rolleyes:
 

CommanderBacon

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May 21, 2018
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It's a thing that occurs in every hobby, I think. People want the most unique/weird/expensive/hard to get element there is.
In mantis keeping, new keepers rarely want the bulletproof and fun Hierodula membranacea, they want the extremely sensitive and fussy Idolomantis diabolica.
I guess it's a form of competition, like always wanting the car that is better than the one your neighbour has.
I think there’s an element of that for some folks, but moreso, people just want a visually striking animal. Most people who want to get into the hobby often don’t think beyond that, and have no point of reference. All tarantulas are just tarantulas to people who don’t have experience with them, and they likely just want something pretty.

I mean, the first T I wanted was a P. metallica, specifically for the colors, but also because it was featured prominently on a vendor site and was the most beautiful tarantula I’d ever seen. Fortunately, I have more experienced friends who said that they themselves were not ready for a pokie, and suggested that I start with an easier species.

I think the simple fact that many of these advanced species are so eye-catching that they are featured often as keepers’ show species is ironically an equal contributor.
 

Andrea82

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I think there’s an element of that for some folks, but moreso, people just want a visually striking animal. Most people who want to get into the hobby often don’t think beyond that, and have no point of reference. All tarantulas are just tarantulas to people who don’t have experience with them, and they likely just want something pretty.

I mean, the first T I wanted was a P. metallica, specifically for the colors, but also because it was featured prominently on a vendor site and was the most beautiful tarantula I’d ever seen. Fortunately, I have more experienced friends who said that they themselves were not ready for a pokie, and suggested that I start with an easier species.

I think the simple fact that many of these advanced species are so eye-catching that they are featured often as keepers’ show species is ironically an equal contributor.
This is a real issue, agreed. I showed my mom, who is terrified of spiders, a calender I helped put together and when she saw the picture of a P.metallica, she said that 'at least it's a beautiful spider'. I was like, 'mom! That's one of the more advanced and fast and potent species! Don't you like this one more?; I showed her C.versicolor, but nope, that was a nasty hairy spider. I was baffled to be honest.
 

Stormsky

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Feb 9, 2016
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When people refer to tarantulas as "Ts" vocally. Just call them spiders if tarantulas is too long. Calling them Ts is okay in text but just sounds ridiculous out loud.
 

Ellenantula

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When people refer to tarantulas as "Ts" vocally. Just call them spiders if tarantulas is too long. Calling them Ts is okay in text but just sounds ridiculous out loud.
Um (looking at my feet) I um, call them my 'tees' all the time. :embarrassed:
Is that bad? o_O
Totally true. :astonished:

[that's gotta beat calling one a 'charanchula' -- yes? maybe? C'mon, some validation -- I can't be the only one to verbally actually refer to them as Tees???]
 

Ellenantula

Arachnoking
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That's literally the only way I've heard it pronounced in the South. I'm pretty sure it's just an accent thing.
Um, never mind where I'm from. Seriously -- I've always heard the 'T' pronounced! I sort of thought 'charantula' was a joke (re: pronunciation) . :zipit:
 

Serpyderpy

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Aug 16, 2017
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People who insist on taking photos of themselves with a tarantula on their face/cleavage/arms where said body part is nowhere near the ground.

People who have a problem with people using the terms "spood", "spooder", or "spoder". Really? There's plenty of stuff that people come out with that is far more deserving of your scorn, lighten up.

People who have a problem with people naming their tarantulas.

People who ask for advice and then throw a tantrum when the answer isn't what they wanted.

The "kill it with fire" brigade.

(Not that I can blame them because it's usually non-T peeps) Random questions referring to a T by a random-as-heck common name I've never heard before like "Are Asian Szechuan Sauce tarantulas aggressive?"
This pretty much sums up any and all contribution I could add to this thread.

Though I will admit I'm guilty of buying a rarer tarantula for my first one, but it was more a case of dumb curiosity that got me. I'd read it was wise to start with terrestrial new worlds and all that and had been looking at the recommended species for a while, but got carried away in the depths of Google image search and related images. I came across Theraphosinae sp. Panama and fell in love, like wow I fell in love hard, but read they were kind of rare and hard to find. Out of curiosity I searched if any were for sale. They were. I'd done months of reading about basic tarantula care and felt I was ready enough to take the plunge, and felt if I didn't act now then I may never get the chance again anytime soon.

Granted if I had messed up it would have been a very expensive mistake, but I felt I was ready, and my little friend has been the best starter tarantula I could have ever asked for. Calm, eats well, just an overall gentle creature. But it was a risk! Maybe some people dive into wierd and obscure ones because they feel as if they can handle it, or love the tarantula itself, or the more recommended species that are encouraged for new keepers don't really resonate with them. I think as long as they look after the animal and do their research, there's no harm, but the price tag means any mistake is a very expensive and harsh mistake, and people have to acknowledge and accept that if they're gonna insist on getting a rarer tarantula.
 
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