Theraphosinae sp. "Colombia" - "Pulso De Fuego"

boina

Lady of the mites
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Your pictures are fantastic (and so is the spider)! What do you do to keep it sitting where it is out in the open so you can take the pic?
 

Exoskeleton Invertebrates

Arachnoprince
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Jun 17, 2007
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DSC_0444.JPG DSC_0451.JPG It is still a baby but quickly growing up. I'm having a blast keeping this little monster. I'm hoping for a female but with my luck I still have an it and maybe a male. Can't sex the little bugger just yet. The color on the carapace changed from when it was smaller.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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Keep posting development pics, new color on the carapace..Nice mi amigo!
 

Leila

Arachnobaron
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What a stunner!!! Thanks for tagging me; I always love to see your vibrant photos :cat:
 

Chris LXXIX

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Seems a kinda different 'GBB'. I'm curious to see an adult specimen "final" patterns/colours.

Btw an amazing 'nickname'... pulso de fuego.
 

Jones0911

Arachnobaron
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Mar 5, 2013
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This has an abodomen look of a Davus pentaloris....would that be an indication that it'll stay under/at 4" as an adult or bigger?
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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@Exoskeleton Invertebrates Much appreciated the updated pics. This is turning out very interesting. I will continue to follow this thread until it's an adult if you keep it that long.

What's the disposition, speed etc like?

Also, any idea of the type of climate this is found in?
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
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Dec 25, 2014
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This species is being considered under the GGB genus name but no one knows for sure
I completely agree with that point of view. IMO the genus Chromatopelma needs to 'welcome' a new "blood", but now, no offence... 'drooling' you said?

Ah! Kid me not hermano, for that you aren't keeping the forgotten 'brother/sister' of the Goddess 0.1 Pelinobius muticus PBUH (Peace Be Upon Her) eh eh eh :)

:kiss:
 

AracKnight

Arachnopeon
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Feb 17, 2017
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Since most of the genera closely related to Davus are poorly defined it's hard to say wich genus a species belongs to.
By the morphology of the spermatheca (see the picture I took of an exuvia of a juvenile female, thx to a good friend providing this exuvia) I think it's safe to say, that it belongs to either Davus, Chromatopelma or Hapalopus.
Schmidt defined Chromatopelma by having "very large inverse drop-like shaped PME", Scopula Tarsus III and Metatarsus IV divided and a single fused seminal receptacle.
Except for the eyes you also find these characteristics in Davus and (partially?) Hapalopus. I think the shape of the PMEs aren't a good diagnostic feature for a genus. Theraphosinae sp. "Colombia" doesn't have such eyes (look at the picture, will add another one of Chromatopelma later for comparison), but that isn't enough for me to say it's 100% not a Chromatopelma.
Gabriel, 2016 differentiated Chromatopelma from Davus by the very short and wide spermathecae in Chromatopelma. Since this is not relaly precise and Gabriel did consider himself that Chromatopelma could be a junior synonym of Davus, this is also not enough for me to call "it's definetely Davus/Chromatopelma", although it would fit more with Davus for my eyes, since it's not much shorter or wider than those of D. fasciatus or D. pentaloris (judged by the pictures in the paper of Gabriel) but definitely less wide than those of Chromatopelma looking at an exuvia of my collection (thx to another good friend for that one, will provide a picture for comparison later).
The only useful character I heard of so far was mentioned by Gabriel. Males of Chromatopelma lack retrolateral keels. So if this one really belongs to Chromatopelma we should see no or only reduced retrolateral keels, although you may could say reduced ones would justify to call it the missing link of Davus and Chromatopelma and thus to synonymize them.

To tell it apart form Hapalopus is even more complicated since this genus is areally poorly defined mess. According to Bertani, 2000 males of Hapalopus spp. lack apical keels, but until a revision of that genus I'd be carefull with sith such statements.
But again, an examination of a preserved mature male should shed some light on this topic. Sadly I wasn't able to get my hands on some of those very pretty spiders :(
 

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