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The P. Dictator

Discussion in 'Scorpions' started by Deolok, Jul 31, 2006.

  1. pandinus

    pandinus Arachnoking Old Timer

    Advertisement
    just to help all of this misunderstanding blow over, i'll see if i can help get you guys a little bit of a fix. It's not a dictator, but i think that it satisfies a lot of the fields that make the dictator so desirable to the community. It is a relatively large, dull blue colored scorpion that, while not as rare as some other species, is not a common offering in the trade. Also, from personal accounts, i have heard it is pretty fiesty. I am of course reffering to heterometrus cyaneus.

    Pic 1
    thread with pics


    Also, here is a link that might have already been posted, but if not, it may be another step closer for you dictator lovers out there
    http://www.arachnoboards.com/ab/showthread.php?t=64747&highlight=cyaneus


    John
     
  2. Oooh! *grabby hands*

    I wonder how unique the scorpions will be at the Unique Animal Expo next weekend . . .
     
  3. Urizen

    Urizen Arachnosquire

    By largest, what do you mean? How is largest mesured? As I know H.Troglodytes is the longest scorpion.
     
  4. EAD063

    EAD063 Arachnoprince

    USA
    I still think we should email the discovery channel LOL.

    Lourenço has done nothing involving dictator? I know he's a busy man but I wish he could have input on this. Someone has to know something. :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2007
  5. skinheaddave

    skinheaddave SkorpionSkin Arachnosupporter

    That's not the type of knowledge I was talking about. There is an original description published, as well as several records of specimens in collections. Size, appearance, habitat and distribution are waiting there for someone to dig them up.

    What is it that people want to know?

    Cheers,
    Dave
     
  6. fusion121

    fusion121 Arachnoking Old Timer

    UK
    Pandinus dictator:

    Here is a large male specimen of P. dictator from the Congo:
    [​IMG]

    From the specimens I’ve seen P. dictator is nearly identical in size to specimens of P. imperator, with the maximum size of each being extremely large. The biggest get to 20+ cm in length. The two species are separated by the number of trichobothria on the ventral surface of the tibia (22 in dictator, >30 in imperator). Both species are black and shiny, not any more blue then any other scorpion species. Its unlikely they'd be anymore interesting to keep then P. imperator, they may already be the hobby but your average hobbiest would not be able to separate them from P. imperator.

    Here are the distributions of the 2 species:
    [​IMG]
    (from: Lourecno W. R. & Cloudsley-Thompson J. L., 1996, Recognition and distribution of the scorpions of the genus Pandinus accorded protection by the Washington convention, Biogeographica, 72(3), 133-143)
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2007
  7. quiz

    quiz Arachnoprince

    Thanks for the picture Oliver. I guess it's not blue after-all:? because the pic above is green {D .
     
  8. EAD063

    EAD063 Arachnoprince

    USA
    Mainly, I want to know why information is so scarce. There are many more rare scorps that we know tons about (mainly because some excellent contributors), I just don't understand what this mystery is. I did email discovery about it but the chances of finding a qualified and informed individual obviously slim, but I'm hoping mostly just to see more pictures.

    Good post Oliver.. I knew I saw those pictures somwhere before, didn't remember where.
     
  9. skinheaddave

    skinheaddave SkorpionSkin Arachnosupporter

    Example?

    Cheers,
    Dave
     
  10. EAD063

    EAD063 Arachnoprince

    USA
    To the best of my knowledge a lot of the tityus species are fairly new but becomming widley distributed correct? I recall seeing old threads from last year and 2 years ago where some of the members who now have many tityus sp. didn't have any at all. I'm just curious and wish I could see more. Not on a die hard hunt for info though.


    I didn't see olivers citation to the above.. I'm now satisfied.
     
  11. fusion121

    fusion121 Arachnoking Old Timer

    UK
    Unlikely since I just took that picture a few days ago.

    The genus Pandinus has not been looked at a great deal, but P. dictator is no more or less particularly well known then any other scorpion species.
     
  12. pandinus

    pandinus Arachnoking Old Timer

    is it just the angle the pic was taken at or does that thing really have a gigantic vesicle?
     
  13. skinheaddave

    skinheaddave SkorpionSkin Arachnosupporter

    Once again, you're blending the lines between what we have and what we know. We know a lot about S.mesaensis. Tonnes of research has been done on it. Yet it is still relatively rare in collections. By contrast, Heterometrus is far from resolved taxonomically and there is only a little known in other fields -- yet they are all over the place.

    As for the citation, there are actually dozens of documents out there that relate to P.dictator in some way. There are only a few that are readily accessable, though.

    Cheers,
    Dave
     
  14. bengerno

    bengerno Arachnobaron Old Timer

    Hi guys,


    I just wanna say If anybody can travel to Africa and has everything to collect scorps (papers etc.), he/she need some luck too!
    My friend was in an expedition in Gambia a few years ago for 2-3 months, and he found only 2 Pandinus sp. (probably one was gambiensis), one of them was killed by ants. He didn't find any tarantulas! His reason to be there was collecting mainly true spiders.
    Traveling in Africa:
    When they wanted to came home, they had the plane tickets, but that day when they had to leave, had no seat on the plane because It was full (he had valid tickets!!). They had to wait 1-2 weeks to be able to leave with another plane, but this time they went to the airport with a biggy man's bodyguards to take their seat! :D

    PS: He almost died due to malaria (3 weeks in hospital)! ;)

    So be careful and good luck for collecting there!
     
  15. Eeek! Maybe I'll wait until I have that bioengineering degree under my belt so I can hire someone to go to west Africa for me.

    Seeing that P. dictator earlier on this page made me wipe the drool off my keyboard.
     
  16. EAD063

    EAD063 Arachnoprince

    USA
    I was referring more to the distribution chart than the true picture.
     
  17. So what perhaps makes the P. Dictator blue in some of the other pictures we have seen? Oh and bengerno, I might have to say your friend got the better end of the stick by just getting malaria (oh my goodness, am I actually saying this?) because if you read the begining of this thread you'll find a lot more interesting topics and information about Corrupt African Goverments <-- There is an "S!" It is plural.

    Oh and is it normal for a scorpion to take on that type of posture? It looks like an odd defensive stance, is it still alive? :confused:
     
  18. Brian S

    Brian S ArachnoGod Old Timer

    It is the lighting. I have seen P imp and Heterometrus look blue as well in some pics

    Looks like a preserved specimen. Note the blue gloves;)
     
  19. fusion121

    fusion121 Arachnoking Old Timer

    UK
    The blue colour comes from the fact its taken in sunlight which has has a large UV component, which causes fluorescence which results in a blue colouration.

    That specimen is a preserved one from the British museum of natural history collections
     
  20. skinheaddave

    skinheaddave SkorpionSkin Arachnosupporter

    It will also have been taken with a digital camera. The CCDs tend to be quite sensitive to blue, resulting in bluer pictures. Consider all the stunning pictures of H.lividum vs. their usual appearance.

    Cheers,
    Dave
     
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