The difference between a tarantula's fangs and a scorpion's stinger

Moakmeister

Arachnolord
Joined
Oct 6, 2016
Messages
632
Obviously the two weapons serve the same function, but they do it in completely different ways. A tarantula's fangs are very strong and function by aggressively stabbing into their prey, crunching straight through the exoskeleton or skin. And that's it. If the fangs can't penetrate the exoskeleton, there's not much else the T can do. But a scorpion's stinger, on the other hand, has very little stabbing power. It can't penetrate the shell of a cockroach very easily. When a scorpion stings, it only just puts the very tip of its stinger into the prey. The stinger's effectiveness comes from it being lethally accurate. We've all seen a scorpion wiggle its tail around, nudging the prey and moving it all over the place, then stinging in a seemingly awkward position. That's because the scorpion is feeling around for a chink in the exoskeleton. We've all seen at least a few of those Japanese bug fighting videos before, and as upsetting as they are, they can be interesting. There are several videos of scorpions being pitted against crayfish or lobsters, and the scorpion always stings the lobster exactly on a chink in its arm. I think it's cool how different tarantulas and scorpions can be. Let's discuss.
 

Spidermolt

Arachnoknight
Joined
May 29, 2015
Messages
203
Ok so I'll start first... Yes Ive seen a few videos before since I look up so many nature videos and occasionally these stupid recommended "battle to the death but its OK because its a bug and not a dog or else there be hellfire :banghead:" videos pop up so out of curiosity I have seen one or two of them but Ive refuse to click and watch them for years now because the watched ratings only increase and therefore promotes them to do more harm.
So I think that scorpions and tarantulas are pretty much the same where they both capture their prey using brute force and their venom to help kill but Ts need the venom to break down tissue wheres scorpions just need a killed prey so they can rip apart their food to eat. In a way its interesting because it seems like your bulkier Ts who don't worry about venom potency are NWs while the lesser built Ts who rely on venom for food or defense are OWs while scorpions are vise versa. In the long run thought I would say that Ts have much more power in their fangs than scorpions who will strike repeatedly looking for a soft spot.

Word of caution your skin is more than soft enough for either side to penetrate.;)
 

Nightstalker47

Arachnoking
Joined
Jul 2, 2016
Messages
2,611
In a way its interesting because it seems like your bulkier Ts who don't worry about venom potency are NWs while the lesser built Ts who rely on venom for food or defense are OWs
You make a good point, but there are exceptions on both sides. P.muticus get huge and are very powerful, they are OW and I definitely wouldn't consider them lesser then many NW species. But there are leggy species and bulky species in both categories. I think venom potency would have something more to do with location, as many bulky OW still have strong venom and same goes for thinner bodied OW species.
 

Spidermolt

Arachnoknight
Joined
May 29, 2015
Messages
203
You make a good point, but there are exceptions on both sides. P.muticus get huge and are very powerful, they are OW and I definitely wouldn't consider them lesser then many NW species. But there are leggy species and bulky species in both categories. I think venom potency would have something more to do with location, as many bulky OW still have strong venom and same goes for thinner bodied OW species.
you do have a point I was thinking about how there are some exceptions out there but It didn't really occur to me location wise.
 
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