((( The Amazing Green Lynx )))

John Koerner

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Joined
Jun 11, 2011
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93
Are spiders brainless opportunists ... or calculated hunters? I don't know about all spiders, but after photographing hundreds of these spiders over the years, it struck me that The Green Lynx is more intelligent (or “aware”) than they are given credit for.

Click on the link above and decide for yourself if The Green Lynx is one of the most calculating, successful predators of its kind ... or just a brainless little arthropod that "gets lucky" a lot (and I mean a lot!) :cool:

Cheers,

Jack
 

pperrotta03

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Joined
Aug 29, 2013
Messages
109
They are pretty amazing hunters. Ive given mine a few flies (BIG ones at that!) and they always nab them out of the air. Luckily for me, it was a gravid female, and I now have ewls at the moment :)
 

Biollantefan54

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Jul 3, 2012
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1,640
Wow, that is awesome! I have 3 of them right now, (all females) they seem pretty smart for spiders lol. I wonder which is smarter, jumper, or lynx? Hmm.........
 

pperrotta03

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Aug 29, 2013
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My adult female is about 1" (1 3/4" - 2" legspan) Id say a jumper is a bit smaller lol. And to the OP, that is an AMAZING picture.
 

The Snark

Dumpster Fire of the Gods
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I was watching one the other day on a flower petal. If I made any movement within 2 feet of it it would dart around to the other side of the petal. The usual about this was it could see a finger wiggle at 2 feet and take alarm and one couldn't see it move. It would negotiate from one side of the petal, around the edge and park on the other side faster than the human eye movement could discern. Then give it a moment and it was back where it started.
These are top flight stalking predators, for darned sure.
 

John Koerner

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Joined
Jun 11, 2011
Messages
93
They are pretty amazing hunters. Ive given mine a few flies (BIG ones at that!) and they always nab them out of the air. Luckily for me, it was a gravid female, and I now have ewls at the moment :)
:)



Wow, that is awesome! I have 3 of them right now, (all females) they seem pretty smart for spiders lol. I wonder which is smarter, jumper, or lynx? Hmm.........
I don't know which is smarter, a jumper or a lynx, but I do know the Lynx is larger and every time I see "one spider killing another" it is invariably the Lynx on the jumper. Also, I have seen jumpers on bees, taking them in some precarious places, whereas the Lynx always seems to take them behind the head. Jumpers seem a little more reckless in their attacks ... rushing toward a prey item ... whereas the Lynx relies more on camo and tends to ambush when the prey item is "right there" but unaware of the Lynx.



My adult female is about 1" (1 3/4" - 2" legspan) Id say a jumper is a bit smaller lol. And to the OP, that is an AMAZING picture.
Yes, jumpers are quite a bit smaller! Thanks for the compliment ... hope you read the full article though :)



I was watching one the other day on a flower petal. If I made any movement within 2 feet of it it would dart around to the other side of the petal. The usual about this was it could see a finger wiggle at 2 feet and take alarm and one couldn't see it move. It would negotiate from one side of the petal, around the edge and park on the other side faster than the human eye movement could discern. Then give it a moment and it was back where it started.
These are top flight stalking predators, for darned sure.
Agreed and thanks for your comments :)

Jack
 

pperrotta03

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Joined
Aug 29, 2013
Messages
109
I tend to misread things more than I would like to admit lol. Im not sure which is smarter, then again I dont have much experience with jumpers

tappy tappa taparoo
 

McGuiverstein

Arachnobaron
Joined
Nov 20, 2012
Messages
348
Awesome pictures man. Not sure what I can contribute beyond what's already been said, but I've been dying to get my hands on a few of these for some time. I used to love feeding them when I'd find them as a kid. Beautiful spiders, and very skilled, calculating hunters.
 

John Koerner

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Joined
Jun 11, 2011
Messages
93
I tend to misread things more than I would like to admit lol. Im not sure which is smarter, then again I dont have much experience with jumpers
tappy tappa taparoo
Awesome pictures man. Not sure what I can contribute beyond what's already been said, but I've been dying to get my hands on a few of these for some time. I used to love feeding them when I'd find them as a kid. Beautiful spiders, and very skilled, calculating hunters.

Glad you guys enjoyed. McGuiverstein, if you would like any, there's still a ton out there & I could get you some. Let me know.
 

Smokehound714

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Mar 23, 2013
Messages
3,093
These are the main competitors with Phidippus audax in my backyard.. in years when Lynx spiders are common, phidippus are uncommon, and vice-versa.

Lynx spiders rock!
 
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