Terresterial - aboreal

ballpython2

Arachnoprince
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\None of my tarantulas under 2" (The singapore blues, and my two slings; the emilia sling and the parahybana sling) have the ability to climb at all.

could this be the reason everyone thinks singapore blues and other aboreal Ts are terresterials as slings and aboreals as adult? They don't really have a choice to be aboreals if their feet haven't delevoped enough to grasp the sides of the walls in their enclosures for them to be able to climb. So this would make them terresterials by default correct?
 

Talkenlate04

ArachnoGod
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have the ability to climb at all.
Oh they can they are just choosing not to.

could this be the reason everyone thinks singapore blues and other aboreal Ts are terresterials as slings and aboreals as adult?
Even captive adults are semi aboreal for one reason or another. Not all but a lot.

They don't really have a choice to be aboreals if their feet haven't delevoped enough to grasp the sides of the walls in their enclosures for them to be able to climb.
I am not sure where you got that info, I have had a few escapes and one was a blue sling. I found her on the ceiling pacing the light.


So this would make them terresterials by default correct?
Incorrect, in the wild they are aboreal. Just because in captivity they exibit ground dwelling tendencies does not make them ground dwellers.
 

P. Novak

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\None of my tarantulas under 2" (The singapore blues, and my two slings; the emilia sling and the parahybana sling) have the ability to climb at all.

could this be the reason everyone thinks singapore blues and other aboreal Ts are terresterials as slings and aboreals as adult? They don't really have a choice to be aboreals if their feet haven't delevoped enough to grasp the sides of the walls in their enclosures for them to be able to climb. So this would make them terresterials by default correct?
Yeah. I'm pretty sure they can climb, but are choosing not to or just can't climb very well. Terrestrial Ts are very poor climbers, but can still climb to some extent.

C. sp. "blue" adult and slings seems semi arboreal to me. I believe they are opportunistic, and will hide where they can.

No "arboreal" T is "terrestrial" when younger, it's just we give them a limited amount of space to choose from. They hide where they can.
 

ballpython2

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Ok..wasn't sure. because my blue .75 -1" ers when they try to get away from the food when they arent hungry ( I did take the food out when i seen them go the opposite way of the food) they just walk in circles the opposite way of the food....so thanks again..
 

Talkenlate04

ArachnoGod
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My slings hide deep at the bottem of the vial at times to, it's pretty normal. They do grow out of it. But my adult I have now she still takes to the ground from time to time.
 

ShadowBlade

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No "arboreal" T is "terrestrial" when younger, it's just we give them a limited amount of space to choose from. They hide where they can.
Yes, some are. And it has to do with natural behavior and environment. Its just whatever the particular tarantula 'decides' to do.


-Sean
 

mrbonzai211

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Both my rosea (5 inches) and my smithi (2 inches) climb all the time. My rosea climbs every time she has to go to the bathroom and my smithi just seems to love climbing. She hangs out for hours on end every day on the wall right above her water dish. I have no idea why she does this, it's not because of anything wrong with the environment, she's just weird like that.
 

P. Novak

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Yes, some are. And it has to do with natural behavior and environment. Its just whatever the particular tarantula 'decides' to do.


-Sean
The quotes in my previous post meant that the Ts weren't literally changing to terrestrials. It's just the way the individual T acts. Ex: Avicularia spp. are arboreal, if one decides to burrow or stay on the ground, I'd still classify them as arboreal, not terrestrial. Sorry if that was confusing.
 

Harrod

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I have a 2" G. aureastriata that has made a huge burrow in the tank which is uses most of the day. Once it starts to get late it comes out and spends all night climbing around the sides of the tank. Its favorite spot to sit is about an inch and a half above its burrow entrance on the side of its tank.
 

P. Novak

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I have a 2" G. aureastriata that has made a huge burrow in the tank which is uses most of the day. Once it starts to get late it comes out and spends all night climbing around the sides of the tank. Its favorite spot to sit is about an inch and a half above its burrow entrance on the side of its tank.
I have a sling that does the same exact thing, but that's because they are known for doing this as slings and juvis. Adults are more visible.
 

bagheera

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Many of my terrestrial enclosures bear fang prints in the screen (top!). My 5 oz B smithii is a hell of a climber, we gave her a "jungle jim"

Many of my aboreals live either in burrows (including 5 adult C. Singapore), or in tubes that either provided or fabricated by the spider.

As said, they are all opportunistic. I think it also self evident that they would all rather be free.
 
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