Tarantulas- Gender and Temperment?

Cure

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 5, 2011
Messages
1
Hi there.
I am new to the hobby, and while I have yet to attain my first tarantula, I have a gently sculpted plan of up to my third spider. I have asked around my local pet stores and read books, but no one has been able to give me an answer that really satisfies.
Specifically on GBB's but in Tarantulas as a general, does Gender have much of an impact on the creature's temperment?
I feel like male's as a general rule would be more timid, but as I said, I'm new to the hobby. I'd really like the opinion of someone, as it will probably impact my collection. I like to handle all my pets, and my T collection will be no different.
 

Chris_Skeleton

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 31, 2010
Messages
1,310
Hi there.
I am new to the hobby, and while I have yet to attain my first tarantula, I have a gently sculpted plan of up to my third spider. I have asked around my local pet stores and read books, but no one has been able to give me an answer that really satisfies.
Specifically on GBB's but in Tarantulas as a general, does Gender have much of an impact on the creature's temperment?
I feel like male's as a general rule would be more timid, but as I said, I'm new to the hobby. I'd really like the opinion of someone, as it will probably impact my collection. I like to handle all my pets, and my T collection will be no different.
You are going to find that handling is a very heated topic around here.

I handle a few of mine occasionally, BUT you will reach a point where you get a spider you just CANNOT handle. There are ZERO benefits to the spider when you handle it. So there is really no need, but to satisfy youre own wants.
 

Jacobchinarian

Arachnoknight
Joined
Aug 2, 2010
Messages
255
There usually is no difference but I have noticed male panama red rumps to be slightly more defensive. Also your plan will probably be abandoned. Mine was I planned on 1:Goliath bird eater, 2:panama red rump 3:cobalt blue. {D I did end up with all of them but my plan was not followed. I also planned on getting 4 tarantulas. Now I have 9 and I plan on getting 3 more at an upcoming show. As far as handling it is best to keep it to a minimum. Sometimes i'll handle some of my more docile species but not often. All that can come out of it is a hurt spider and regrets.
 

Cure

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 5, 2011
Messages
1
You are going to find that handling is a very heated topic around here.

I handle a few of mine occasionally, BUT you will reach a point where you get a spider you just CANNOT handle. There are ZERO benefits to the spider when you handle it. So there is really no need, but to satisfy youre own wants.
Meh~
If you care to notice, Handling wasn't my question. I know it's not advised, but I have done my research, and I know plenty of people who handle their Tarantulas.

In any case, thank you very much for your imput. I am sorry to say though, in the mind of a teenage girl, it didn't much affect my decisions.
 

xhexdx

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 20, 2007
Messages
5,363
Meh~
If you care to notice, Handling wasn't my question. I know it's not advised, but I have done my research, and I know plenty of people who handle their Tarantulas.
In any case, thank you very much for your imput. I am sorry to say though, in the mind of a teenage girl, it didn't much affect my decisions.
Meh~

How does this make it ok, or have anything to do with your 'research'?

Additionally, how do you even qualify your response, considering you yourself have said your question wasn't handling. On top of that, why even mention handling in your original post if it wasn't your question?

Go ahead, handle an H. lividum, P. murinus, H. maculata or S. calceatum.

If you want something timid that you can handle (as I interpreted your original post to mean) so you can get your kicks, you're going to want to stick with new world spiders.

I'd really like the opinion of someone, as it will probably impact my collection.
In any case, thank you very much for your imput. I am sorry to say though, in the mind of a teenage girl, it didn't much affect my decisions.
ROFL!
 

Cure

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 5, 2011
Messages
1
There usually is no difference but I have noticed male panama red rumps to be slightly more defensive. Also your plan will probably be abandoned. Mine was I planned on 1:Goliath bird eater, 2:panama red rump 3:cobalt blue. {D I did end up with all of them but my plan was not followed. I also planned on getting 4 tarantulas. Now I have 9 and I plan on getting 3 more at an upcoming show. As far as handling it is best to keep it to a minimum. Sometimes i'll handle some of my more docile species but not often. All that can come out of it is a hurt spider and regrets.
Haha~
I know my plan probably won't be followed- I just find it exciting to see my desire for the creatures developing at such a rate. However, I know I will for sure get these three spiders at the very least. =3 I have held a Goliath Bird eater, but honestly the creatures scare me a tad... My general plan, for now, is to first get my Red Knee, who I will attain in two or so weeks. After him will be my GBB, and after that I was thinking a Salmon-Pink Bird Eater, as I was told their temperment was far easier to deal with.

And thanks! I wasn't sure, but, especially to GBB I thought that the female would likely be a little less defensive. It's often that I'm wrong though, and this is no different. ^^
 

xhexdx

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 20, 2007
Messages
5,363
I wasn't sure, but, especially to GBB I thought that the female would likely be a little less defensive. It's often that I'm wrong though, and this is no different.
That last sentence is really the kicker...

To try to answer the part of your question that doesn't relate to handling...

Temperment is more based on species, not so much on gender. That being said, you'll always find the rare smithi, pulchripes, or chromatus that is an 8-legged demon.

Females are more desirable by the typical hobbyist because of their longer life span over males.
 

Cure

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 5, 2011
Messages
1
That last sentence is really the kicker...

To try to answer the part of your question that doesn't relate to handling...

Temperment is more based on species, not so much on gender. That being said, you'll always find the rare smithi, pulchripes, or chromatus that is an 8-legged demon.

Females are more desirable by the typical hobbyist because of their longer life span over males.
Well thank you very much for your input. I already planned on sticking mainly to NW spiders for anything to handle, but I very much appreciate you seconding this.
 

Jacobchinarian

Arachnoknight
Joined
Aug 2, 2010
Messages
255
I have held a Goliath Bird eater, but honestly the creatures scare me a tad...
you have held a Goliath?!?! You have guts! When I was driving home with my Goliath after I'd just bought it I opened the deli cup and touched his legs (he is my first t and at that point I had only owned him for 15 minutes so I had no idea what I was doing) and he kind of moved over my hands and tried to bite me with no threat pose or anything. Just as xhexdx said about 8 legged demons maybe the Goliath you handled was and 8 legged bunny. Also get a female for sure. A male p ornata for example will live 2 years or so but a properly cared for female can live 15 years.
 

NikiP

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 16, 2006
Messages
540
Well thank you very much for your input. I already planned on sticking mainly to NW spiders for anything to handle, but I very much appreciate you seconding this.
Just wanted to add that you should still do research on any species before buying if you plan on handling, even if it's NW.

E. murinus & P. irminia don't have nice personalities... :evil: :D
 

Cure

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 5, 2011
Messages
1
you have held a Goliath?!?! You have guts! When I was driving home with my Goliath after I'd just bought it I opened the deli cup and touched his legs (he is my first t and at that point I had only owned him for 15 minutes so I had no idea what I was doing) and he kind of moved over my hands and tried to bite me with no threat pose or anything. Just as xhexdx said about 8 legged demons maybe the Goliath you handled was and 8 legged bunny. Also get a female for sure. A male p ornata for example will live 2 years or so but a properly cared for female can live 15 years.
Thanks. And yeah, she was probably more of the bunny you speak of. My friend has had (her?) for something like three years, and whenever I go over there, I try and hold his precious. I know he has been bitten by her, but I guess she's handled enough that being around a new person didn't scare her. And, at that point, I'm just glad I didn't drop her. I wasn't exactly uncomfortable with spiders, but I never thought I'd hold one of that size.
And thanks! I deffinately want mainly females. ^^

---------- Post added at 11:22 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:12 PM ----------

Just wanted to add that you should still do research on any species before buying if you plan on handling, even if it's NW.

E. murinus & P. irminia don't have nice personalities... :evil: :D
Very true. ^^ I have been studying and will continue to do so until my interest has been satisfied.
 

Transylvania

Gondorian
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 26, 2006
Messages
593
How about instead of criticizing a new member of our community, we just answer her original question? Some choose to handle and others don't - it's not anyone else's decision to make for them.
Now, I don't know of any distinct temperamental differences between sexes, but if I'm not mistaken I believe mature males tend to be more on the docile side since they're so dead-set on finding a mate (but someone can correct me on that).
Here's another thread that touches on this subject:

http://www.arachnoboards.com/ab/showthread.php?t=153181

Welcome to the hobby! :)
 

Chris_Skeleton

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 31, 2010
Messages
1,310
I know he has been bitten by her, but I guess she's handled enough that being around a new person didn't scare her.
Why do people make spiders more complex than they really are?


Cure, to answer you're original question, I would believe mature males would be. Up to they mature, I don't think there is any difference because only the mature males would be searching for a mate.
 

Cure

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 5, 2011
Messages
1
How about instead of criticizing a new member of our community, we just answer her original question? Some choose to handle and others don't - it's not anyone else's decision to make for them.
Now, I don't know of any distinct temperamental differences between sexes, but if I'm not mistaken I believe mature males tend to be more on the docile side since they're so dead-set on finding a mate (but someone can correct me on that).
Here's another thread that touches on this subject:

http://www.arachnoboards.com/ab/showthread.php?t=153181

Welcome to the hobby! :)
Thank you very much. ^^ I appreciate the answers. I'm excited to be a part of it.

---------- Post added at 09:42 AM ---------- Previous post was at 09:40 AM ----------

Why do people make spiders more complex than they really are?


Cure, to answer you're original question, I would believe mature males would be. Up to they mature, I don't think there is any difference because only the mature males would be searching for a mate.
I just assumed that being held more and more, the creature would get used to it and begin to not bite, or at the very least, bite less? A foolish presumption, perhaps, but it made sense to me.

Thank you for the answer though. It's been something I've been wondering for a bit now.
 

Chris_Skeleton

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 31, 2010
Messages
1,310
I just assumed that being held more and more, the creature would get used to it and begin to not bite, or at the very least, bite less? A foolish presumption, perhaps, but it made sense to me.
Nope. They will not get acclimated to handling. That's a pretty common assumption among new keepers though.
 

Hobo

( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)
Staff member
Joined
Jul 27, 2009
Messages
2,206
I just assumed that being held more and more, the creature would get used to it and begin to not bite, or at the very least, bite less? A foolish presumption, perhaps, but it made sense to me.

Thank you for the answer though. It's been something I've been wondering for a bit now.
Not so foolish, and don't be so quick to make up your mind!
This is one of those "hot topics" that us enthusiasts will argue about (others include hybrids, tank size, hydration method, etc.). You're going to get tons of valid opinions for or against certain things, including handling.

Here's an interesting post by Stan Shultz (author of the Tarantula Keeper's Guide, which I suggest you find and read) that suggests that some indviduals can get accustomed to handling over time. Interesting thread too.

I myself can confirm this, as I used to handle my Rosea frequently when I got her, and she noticeably became much more receptive to handling over time (by receptive, I mean significantly less "stressed" poses during handling, less skittish/defensive reactions to prodding, and less "recovery time" after she was let back in her cage). I would hesitate to try this with old world tarantulas of course.

Nowadays, though, I don't handle unless absolutely necessary (or by accident!), and only use a safe catch cup, plastic bag or tub or something. While I do believe that some individuals can get accustomed to handling, I also believe it is true that they gain nothing at all from physical handling by us, except for potential danger, regardless if they are stressed or not. In the end, I try to do what's safer for my spider, and for that reason, I choose to handle as little as possible. I think I can get by without having to handle one with my bare hands!:eek:

My advice is to do your own research through searches or threads like this one and when you get your T, try handling yourself if still wish.

Anyway, If you are doing research, I'd probably ignore whatever the pet stores tell you. Not all, but the majority won't know what they're on about.

From my experience, I've noticed no difference in temperment between the
sexes, except for Mature Males, who tend to be very skittish. At the moment, I have a pair of GBBs, and the mature male is actually quite laid back, content to slightly shuffle out of the way rather than turn and kick like my female does when I need to move them away from something. Prior to his mature molt, they both acted pretty much the same.
 

Fran

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 8, 2007
Messages
1,533
Tarantulas dont work that way.
They wont get used to humans, neither they will be less prone to bite.

They are unpredictable wild animals and the possibility of a bite for "no reason"
will always exist.
Thats my educated opinion based on animal behavior,sepcially something as simple and "instinct guided" as a tarantula.

I also fully agree with what Joe said.
 

Suidakkra

Arachnosquire
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Nov 23, 2010
Messages
147
Eat and Mate, that is the primary function of a spiders brain. It's not large enough to register love, emotion or cuddliness. If you look at the bite reports on this board, you will see a good deal of them are from specimens that were held regularly,male and female, and just decided to say hello with the fangs. Its called primal instinct.

As to the question of gender, I see no difference in defensiveness. Like mentioned , there may be occasions of a rare specimen that is less aggressive/defensive than another, but in the end, they will still bite. The proof is in the reports.
 

Cure

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 5, 2011
Messages
1
From my experience, I've noticed no difference in temperment between the sexes, except for Mature Males, who tend to be very skittish. At the moment, I have a pair of GBBs, and the mature male is actually quite laid back, content to slightly shuffle out of the way rather than turn and kick like my female does when I need to move them away from something. Prior to his mature molt, they both acted pretty much the same.
Thank you very much... And I appreciate both your knowledge on the subject and the link you gave me. ^^ I will order the book today.

---------- Post added at 06:01 PM ---------- Previous post was at 05:57 PM ----------

Thats my educated opinion based on animal behavior, sepcially something as simple and "instinct guided" as a tarantula.
Ahh~
I really am beggining to see the mixed opinions. Thank you, though... It's good to see things in every light. I have never worked with spiders, though I have a lot of experience with other creatures, including reptiles, mammals and aquatic mammals. I guess I was just sort of hoping this would be something of the same nature, though obviously have more studying to do on the topic.

---------- Post added at 06:01 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:01 PM ----------

As to the question of gender, I see no difference in defensiveness. Like mentioned , there may be occasions of a rare specimen that is less aggressive/defensive than another, but in the end, they will still bite. The proof is in the reports.
Wonderful. Everyone at least has the same things to say here, so I know what to expect. ^^
Thank you!
 

Chris_Skeleton

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 31, 2010
Messages
1,310
All that being said, you need to get females when possible, because they have a much greater lifespan.
 
Top