Tarantula Molts Under Microscope

N1ghtFire

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I have 3 avicularia versicolor molts and a Lasiodora Parahybana molt. They are all pretty small, probably to small to sex for someone who has no experience sexing tarantulas, but I decided to look at them under a microscope just for the fun of it. Can anyone tell me what I am seeing? I am unsure that I am even looking in the correct spot to sex them, so i dont expect anyone to be able tell their gender, but what am I seeing?
First 2 pictures are from Versicolor one, last 2 are versicolor three, and middle one is versicolor 5. (I dont have names for them yet)

Two of the molts look the same and have a little tan line in the middle of the abdomen, while one molt, the 3rd picture, doesnt have that line. Would that differance between the molts be a male vs female difference? Why is one molt differant than the other two??
 

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N1ghtFire

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to sex, look at the abdomen from the interior.
These are pictures of their abdomen, but being as small as they are I couldn't manage to get the abdomen spread out to see the inside. Since the molts are still transparent I hoped that they may be able to be sexed with the light shining through to see the inside, and maybe someone with more knowledge could tell me what they are. These are some of my first Ts so I have never sexed tarantulas and have no idea what im doing. :p Plus they are all smaller than 1" so that makes it even more impossible.
 

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AphonopelmaTX

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All of those pictures are of the carapace with close ups of the apodeme. To look at tarantula molts at any size, it's best to use a stereo microscope with lighting from the top and/ or sides. Because you have the molts on slides I am assuming you are using a compound, but if you are actually using a stereo microscope, then disregard. Lighting from the bottom will more often wash out the image you see through the ocular lenses and make observing fine details and structures more difficult.

I agree with Toxoderidae. It would be best to wait until they are bigger so you can more easily see the sex organs from inside of the abdomen.
 

N1ghtFire

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All of those pictures are of the carapace with close ups of the apodeme.
Are you sure it is the carapace I am looking at? I thought the carapace was the middle section the legs attatch to.. I am pretty sure I was looking at the abdomen. I circled the section I had the microscope focused on in the picture attatched..
 

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The Grym Reaper

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No worries mate, you want to flatten out the abdomen so you can see both pairs of book lungs and check the area between the first pair (marked on the pic below), females will have a small opening that spans this gap, it's much easier to spot when the T is bigger though, hope that helps.
 

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