Tarantula molting

Paula Lewis

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My female desert blonde tarantula molted last night, I woke up this morning to see it had already molted but had been lay on her back not moving for around 10 hours, I have removed the molt and made sure it is humid inside, but she looks dead and hasn't moved for 10 hours
 

Paiige

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She could just be stretching, sometimes they lay on their backs afterwards for a while. Her legs should be occasionally twitching a little bit. If she is dead, she will start to smell. Do you have pictures?
 

YagerManJennsen

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Aphonopelma chalcodes aka desert blondes do not need moisture accept for a water dish. 10 hours is no worry for a molting T. If it starts to reach 48 hours then you should seek help.

Can we see a picture of your spider and the enclosure?

*edit: the spider was laying on its back for 10 hours after molting could be just stretching, though I've never seen a T stretch out on it's back
 

Paiige

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Aphonopelma chalcodes aka desert blondes do not need moisture accept for a water dish. 10 hours is no worry for a molting T. If it starts to reach 48 hours then you should seek help.

Can we see a picture of your spider and the enclosure?

*edit: the spider was laying on its back for 10 hours after molting could be just stretching, though I've never seen a T stretch out on it's back

My G. pulchra stretched on his back for about 3 hours after his last molt, I know it's not 10 hours but he's still small
 

YagerManJennsen

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My G. pulchra stretched on his back for about 3 hours after his last molt, I know it's not 10 hours but he's still small
thats interesting, none of my babies have been seen stretching out on their backs. That doesn't mean they cant or dont. :astonished:
 

nicodimus22

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Don't worry about humidity, as this is a desert species. Just keep the water dish full.

The best thing to do right now is leave it alone (preferably in a dark place) and check on it again tomorrow.
 

Paula Lewis

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Aphonopelma chalcodes aka desert blondes do not need moisture accept for a water dish. 10 hours is no worry for a molting T. If it starts to reach 48 hours then you should seek help.

Can we see a picture of your spider and the enclosure?I'm almost certain she is dead she has never looked like this during a molt before and this is her 3Rd molt I will upload a picture
 

Paula Lewis

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Aphonopelma chalcodes aka desert blondes do not need moisture accept for a water dish. 10 hours is no worry for a molting T. If it starts to reach 48 hours then you should seek help.

Can we see a picture of your spider and the enclosure?

*edit: the spider was laying on its back for 10 hours after molting could be just stretching, though I've never seen a T stretch out on it's back
Aphonopelma chalcodes aka desert blondes do not need moisture accept for a water dish. 10 hours is no worry for a molting T. If it starts to reach 48 hours then you should seek help.

Can we see a picture of your spider and the enclosure?

*edit: the spider was laying on its back for 10 hours after molting could be just stretching, though I've never seen a T stretch out on it's back
 

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Andrea82

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That doesn't look like post-molt stretch position to me...but I hope I am wrong :(
Maybe something went wrong with the molting process.
I'd check regularly before giving up though.
 

Paula Lewis

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My female desert blonde tarantula molted last night, I woke up this morning to see it had already molted but had been lay on her back not moving for around 10 hours, I have removed the molt and made sure it is humid inside, but she looks dead and hasn't moved for 10 hours
She is sinking deep Into the ground
 

Paiige

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Yeah that looks like a death curl to me, if not some very tight stretching. If you gently tap one of her legs will she move? Be careful because if she's still alive she will be very delicate.
I also see some moisture under her? Did you try to spray her?


Upon second look at those photos, her abdomen looks a bit weird and ripply and I'm definitely suspicious of the moisture under her. There's not really much you can do now, just wait it out but it doesn't look great. Leave her alone, if she starts to smell she's gone. I'm sorry :(
 
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cold blood

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Not a death curl, that's a typical position from a freshly molted t...at least that's my opinion.


What are your temps like? I had a time when my temps dropped too much and a t molted...it never got up from its back.
 

Paula Lewis

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So you say you are using quick sand as substrate then.:meh:

I also wonder about that wet spot by her, is it from her, or some attempt to give water?
I don't believe in tarantulas coming Into contact with water I wouldn't spray her or wet her body she looks sticky so I think all those fluids are coming from her very sad
 

cold blood

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Sounds like a wet molt....this means an area of the exo either failed to grow in an area, or was damaged during the process. Time will tell, but it doesn't sound good.
 
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