Tarantula got intoxicated

Lili

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 22, 2021
Messages
5
Hi guys , my friend just told me that his tarantula is intoxicated because his brother fed it a venom cockroach, ( so weird) . He is looking for help and i have never had a experience like this . Has anyone experienced this? Thanks ! 0BB19D8C-516E-4DC4-91B5-9768C21EB220.jpeg F86F922E-23D9-4AB9-89E3-1B8D57DBE931.jpeg 55B071E4-AC44-4A81-BF38-CEB0FF3EAD5C.jpeg
 

thatdadlife619

Arachnosquire
Joined
Dec 24, 2019
Messages
120
I’ll be honest, I’ve never heard the term “venom cockroach” before.

that looks like maybe a mature male Ceratogyrus at the end of his time? I’ll let others weigh in
 

Coradams

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2018
Messages
143
Something tells me it's not the tarantula that is intoxicated. Did he feed the t a cockroach that he found crawling around, possibly through insecticide? Did he give alcohol to a cockroach which drank it and then fed the cockroach to the t? (Not sure that is even a thing.) Either way all you can do is flip over the t and drop water on its mouth and hope it drinks. But it doesn't look good. Like thatdadlife619 said, it just may be at the end of its life. Good luck
 

Lili

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 22, 2021
Messages
5
Something tells me it's not the tarantula that is intoxicated. Did he feed the t a cockroach that he found crawling around, possibly through insecticide? Did he give alcohol to a cockroach which drank it and then fed the cockroach to the t? (Not sure that is even a thing.) Either way all you can do is flip over the t and drop water on its mouth and hope it drinks. But it doesn't look good. Like thatdadlife619 said, it just may be at the end of its life. Good luck
Thank you ! I'll pass the message on to my friend.
 

Kibosh

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2013
Messages
75
Something tells me it's not the tarantula that is intoxicated. Did he feed the t a cockroach that he found crawling around, possibly through insecticide? Did he give alcohol to a cockroach which drank it and then fed the cockroach to the t? (Not sure that is even a thing.) Either way all you can do is flip over the t and drop water on its mouth and hope it drinks. But it doesn't look good. Like thatdadlife619 said, it just may be at the end of its life. Good luck
I don't think that's what the OP meant by "intoxicated". There is clearly a language barrier here.

I think they mean that their friend fed it a cockroach that likely had some kind of toxic substance on it such as an insecticide or household chemical, which is very common for roaches in urban environments.

If that is the case then the advice given is the best course of action. Put it in a good ICU and rest its mouth in water and hope for the best.

Lesson: Don't feed your T's wild prey ever.

Obviously this was not intentional, but the statement still stands.
 

Lili

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 22, 2021
Messages
5
Thank you for the advice. I guess friend’s brother caught a cockroach in his house and then fed to the T 🤦🏻‍♀️. I have 31 Ts and I’ve never fed them wild caught insects because I don’t know where they got into and what they might be carrying .also , come on ! Feeders are cheap ....... Some people just need to know more about caring tarantulas.
I’ll pass the message on to him . Thank you !
 

Coradams

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Mar 28, 2018
Messages
143
I don't think that's what the OP meant by "intoxicated". There is clearly a language barrier here.
Ahh I see what you are saying. Not intoxicated but meaning toxic. That makes so much more sense you are probably right.
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,712
that looks like maybe a mature male Ceratogyrus at the end of his time? I’ll let others weigh in
That spider isn't a Ceratogyrus spp. at all.

It's a Grammostola spp. now if my eyes doesn't betray me, a G. pulchripes.

---

I don't get why things like that still happens in 2021, especially with all the sources and infos available here (and not only here, being fair).

Never give to your inverts a prey that was taken from "the wild". It's like playing the 'Russian Roulette'. Roaches get in contact with every crap possible that exist... The "We are what we eat" goes for T's as well.
 
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thatdadlife619

Arachnosquire
Joined
Dec 24, 2019
Messages
120
That spider isn't a Ceratogyrus spp. at all.

It's a Grammostola spp. now if my eyes doesn't betray me, a G. pulchripes.

---

I don't get why things like that still happens in 2021, especially with all the sources and infos available here (and not only here, being fair).

Never give to your inverts a prey that was taken from "the wild". It's like playing the 'Russian Roulette'. Roaches get in contact with every crap possible that exist... The "We are what we eat" goes for T's as well.
My eyes have seem to betray me it seems
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
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Jan 19, 2014
Messages
12,030
venom needs to be injected to work...venom is perfectly safe to consume.

that t is in a serious death curl.
 

Royalty

Arachnoknight
Active Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2020
Messages
210
venom needs to be injected to work...venom is perfectly safe to consume.

that t is in a serious death curl.
Well it depends, if you have a stomach lesion or an ulcer you can get affected. Just not a good idea to try it anytime soon.

I feel bad for the poor spider. Did it recover?
 

RoachCoach

Arachnoknight
Active Member
Joined
Sep 2, 2019
Messages
290
Let that message be a reminder to all keepers and potential keepers. Nature outside is nasty. Bake whatever you put into your enclosures. You wouldn't eat the delicious cicada swarm that is coming without cooking them. Then don't feed your animals WILD UNCOOKED FOOD.
 

ColeopteraC

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2020
Messages
409
Could be (and most likely is) the roach however I can spot a few indicative signs of enclosure issues through the photo (mainly the Exo-Terra wall backdrop, exo-terras are tall, T falls etc.) which could also have played into it.

Couple that with the sp. misidentification and it’s very possible it’s provided living conditions weren’t conducive to a long life either...
 
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