Tarantula Behavior

Tremors

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 30, 2010
Messages
29
Let's say you bought a spiderling, maybe 1/4" or 1/2" and raised it lovingly, brought it out occasionally and handled it carefully. Is there any difference between that little spiderling when it get's to be 2-3" or another spider, exact same species and same size, that you bought from a tarantula breeder, and has been raised with dozens of other tarantulas in a deli cup to the same size of 2-3".

Will they both have the same level of attitude towards a human?
 

Sleazoid

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jul 18, 2010
Messages
241
Let's say you bought a spiderling, maybe 1/4" or 1/2" and raised it lovingly, brought it out occasionally and handled it carefully. Is there any difference between that little spiderling when it get's to be 2-3" or another spider, exact same species and same size, that you bought from a tarantula breeder, and has been raised with dozens of other tarantulas in a deli cup to the same size of 2-3".

Will they both have the same level of attitude towards a human?
Handling a wild tarantula and a captive bred one is pretty much the same. They can not feel love for us, they are not dogs and cats. They live primarily on instinct.

All specimens are different even if the same species. One could be really relaxed, the other could be the most defensive of all your T's.
 

Suidakkra

Arachnosquire
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Nov 23, 2010
Messages
147
I truely believe all Tarantulas have their own personality. Just take Grammostola rosea for example. Some say they are the best for beginners because of their hardiness and being docile,but then you have some G.rosea (mine for instance) that believe they are a OBT, :evil:
I raised her from a 1/2 inch sling, when she became a sub-adult , she decided to become a P.murinus in disguise. {D

There are tons of videos on Youtube where people hold Pokies, H.macs, P.irminia, etc.

So I believe it depends on the individual Tarantula when it comes to being aggressive/defensive/docile.
 

Chris_Skeleton

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 31, 2010
Messages
1,310
Tarantulas can't be tamed and they feel no emotions. Each individual will vary in personality. All my Ts that I have 2 or more of, not one acts the same as the other.

Although, I have wondered:
If tarantulas can't be accustomed to us, how come they can tell the difference between a finger and a roach or cricket?
 

satanslilhelper

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
May 24, 2009
Messages
734
T's can change their dispositions after a molt too. My first B. smithi was skittish and flighty when I got her as a juvie. Then after her first molt in my care she became my go to for showing off how docile she was. Now after several more molts have come and gone she's turned into a nasty hair kicking beast. What I'm saying is their personalities can change over time too.
 

Londoner

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 21, 2008
Messages
846
Although, I have wondered:
If tarantulas can't be accustomed to us, how come they can tell the difference between a finger and a roach or cricket?

I'd say it's got something to do with the chemoreceptive setae on their palps and front legs. Most of the time they seem to realize that human fingers aren't food as soon as they grab you. The times when they do go ahead and bite anyway could just be down to a defensive response and not a feeding response.

Although I don't know of any sound, scientific studies into the subject, there certainly seems to be a lot of anecdotal evidence that could support the theory that Ts may become acclimated to human interaction :).
 

TalonAWD

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 28, 2007
Messages
1,122
Although, I have wondered:
If tarantulas can't be accustomed to us, how come they can tell the difference between a finger and a roach or cricket?
I think it would be the same as a human blindfolded and putting food in front of him/her. Than asking them if its a piece of cake or a piece of chicken. I'm sure they can in a sense "Smell" the difference with their highly sensitive sensing hairs (I don't know the proper term or name to these sensing organs lol)

EDIT:
I'd say it's got something to do with the chemoreceptive setae on their palps and front legs. Most of the time they seem to realize that human fingers aren't food as soon as they grab you. The times when they do go ahead and bite anyway could just be down to a defensive response and not a feeding response.

Although I don't know of any sound, scientific studies into the subject, there certainly seems to be a lot of anecdotal evidence that could support the theory that Ts may become acclimated to human interaction :).
There you go!
 

Andrei

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 2, 2010
Messages
9
There will not be any diference betwen the two tarantulas. Only the diferences created by their behaviour. They are different individuals, not exact copies of the same individual. But we cannot by handling, interacting, or any other method modify that. You cannot tame ar train them. They are some very simple organisms.
 
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