Taming slings for calm adults?

Avic_Addict

Arachnosquire
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Apr 2, 2007
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I was asked today that if a spider is handled regularly as a sling will it be easier to handle as an adult? I was unable to answer as I personally don't handle my Ts. The question was, I belive, in reference to Avics in particular.

Any suggestions?
 

Cirith Ungol

Ministry of Fluffy Bunnies
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This has been up here and there, couldn't point you to a particular thread though. The answer is rather simple though: No. The biggest reasons for spiders becomming calmer if handled more often is that the HANDLER becomes calmer and more experienced in handling.
 

Alice

Arachnoangel
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i totally agree with the ministry of darkness. ;)

another note on handling avic slings: they are fast and fragile - and they jump. so they are easy to injure or lose during handling. i just wouldn't do it.

ok, i do it from time to time, but only cause one of my versi slings is fond of jumping out as soon as you open his container. :eek:
 

Nitibus

Arachnodemon
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I have also heard that once a t moults you have to re-hand-train them. Its like they forget during moulting.
 

Diva Satanica

Arachnosquire
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I have also heard that once a t moults you have to re-hand-train them. Its like they forget during moulting.
From what I have read, tarantulas don't have any ability to retain memory in the sense of "training". They do what instinct and their own personalities dictate them to do...........
 

cacoseraph

ArachnoGod
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it seems to me that tarantulas have more learning capability than most give them credit for

basically my experience has been that most tarantulas do seem to be more "nervous" the first time i play with them and sort of "calm down" pretty quickly. one thing that is interesting to me is that spiders that absolutely do not "want" to walk on me initially (most arboreals don't like the way i taste) seem to be less reluctant as we spend more time together.

it would seem to me that this would be a strong indicator that spiderlings held a lot as babies (and not dropped, "scared", etc) would likely be more calm as adults. it wouldn't be from learning young, but rather from constant conditioning that being free handled does not equate to a threat.


as far as relearning on molt, i think that is misinterpreting the data available. i think that they have different phases of behaviour during their molt/intermolt cycle and the nervousness displayed postmolt has more to do with their physical and hormonal condition rather than forgetting any conditioning they have already learned.


i have handled dozens of species and hundreds of individuals. i have never hurt a single one in ~3 years as a result of free handling. :)
 

Talkenlate04

ArachnoGod
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Feb 13, 2006
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There is some debate on their ability to learn and retain things. But I agree most of what they do is out of instinct and genetics.

So your answer is no. They only react to whats happening around them and adapt for that situation. Its nothing you can teach them.
 

duente

Arachnosquire
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Apr 15, 2006
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google for "habituation"..that's the most you can get out of them..
 

moose35

Arachnoprince
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May 14, 2005
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i think the t's train us in the ways they want to be handled.
i'm sure you all have t's that prefer 1 method of holding to another.i have some stories if some would like to hear.........
later guys/gals
Tom
 

ShadowBlade

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basically my experience has been that most tarantulas do seem to be more "nervous" the first time i play with them and sort of "calm down" pretty quickly. one thing that is interesting to me is that spiders that absolutely do not "want" to walk on me initially (most arboreals don't like the way i taste) seem to be less reluctant as we spend more time together.
Yes, but I see that as a result them adapting to the idea handling is not a threat- for the time being.

You get an Avic sling out, it runs, jumps, webs, and shoots poo for five minutes, because its 'scared'. But it calms down after apparently realizing it isn't being hurt.

As I'm sure you've noticed as well, when handling more 'defensive' specimens, they seem so protective, and throw threat displays, but once on your hand for a minute, they calm down- not feeling threatened.

I do not believe they 'learn' anything. They just adapt to the stimuli they're experiencing as not a threat, but they won't remember it a month later.

-Sean
 
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