Taking the OBT Leap

Liam52

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 25, 2019
Messages
31
Hi all,
I can almost guarantee that I’ll catch flak here for doing this, but I purchased an OBT (RCF) as my first Old World species. My options were slim (OBT, Chilobrachys sp. Kaeng Krachan, and a tiny C. Lividum Sling) and I felt I was ready to purchase my first OW. I have 5 other T’s (T. Albopilosum, N. Chromatus, A. Seemanni, A. Avicularia, and L. Parahybana) and have my basic husbandry/rehousing down. I purchased the OBT and had to do a rehouse already because of mold in the enclosure. I know the substrate in my new enclosure may be a tad shallow, but I noticed it seemed to prefer a web tunnel rather than burrowing in the enclosure it came in. The initial rehouse went smoothly, and I already experienced a glimpse into “OBT Teleportation”.

I know many veteran keepers suggest steering away from OBTs as a first OW, but I have also seen many say they began with OBTs themselves. I’m confident enough in my abilities to work with my T’s and I decided to house the specimen in an enclosure that it can do some growing into so as to eliminate the frequency of rehousings for at least a few molts. Thoughts on the setup would be greatly appreciated. I have seen a number of keepers suggest a semi-arboreal setup, and I noted how the specimen seemed to prefer constructing web tunnels in favor of burrowing. Thanks in advance! EF10FEC9-D1CE-430D-A567-C473E74F50C2.jpeg
 

spideyspinneret78

Arachnoknight
Active Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2019
Messages
181
An OBT was my first OW as well. As long as you have common sense and know what you're going to be dealing with beforehand, I don't think you'll have any issues honestly. They're also very hardy and easy to take care of, in fact, they're one of the easiest tarantulas husbandry-wise. Each individual varies of course, but my female P. murinus isn't even what I would consider "aggressive"....she's actually very skittish. I think that as long as you provide them with the right setup and a few good places to hide, you're unlikely to have problems. They're a very interesting species and very beautiful too. You'll especially enjoy the web fortresses that they create.

An OBT was my first OW as well. As long as you have common sense and know what you're going to be dealing with beforehand, I don't think you'll have any issues honestly. They're also very hardy and easy to take care of, in fact, they're one of the easiest tarantulas husbandry-wise. Each individual varies of course, but my female P. murinus isn't even what I would consider "aggressive"....she's actually very skittish. I think that as long as you provide them with the right setup and a few good places to hide, you're unlikely to have problems. They're a very interesting species and very beautiful too. You'll especially enjoy the web fortresses that they create.
Also, while OBTs certainly have a reputation, I wouldn't even really consider it a "leap". Mostly, it's just a bad idea for brand new keepers who've never had a tarantula before, or for folks who haven't bothered to do any research beforehand. As long as you've had a few other species first and have done your research, then there's no reason why you shouldn't get one as your first OW in my opinion. You know yourself better than anyone, and I can tell that you feel confident. The key is to just expect the unexpected with rehousing, etc. and not get complacent.
 

kingshockey

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 4, 2017
Messages
11
i always thought p murinus was a fossorial t your gonna end up with a defensive possibly flighty t i think keeping it like that
 

mellow

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2020
Messages
147
Maybe when I get a little more experience with keeping tarantulas I'll look into keeping an OBT! 😃
 

The Grym Reaper

Arachnoreaper
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Jul 19, 2016
Messages
3,568
I have seen a number of keepers suggest a semi-arboreal setup
From people who don't know better/get their info from care sheets.

P. murinus are heavy webbing fossorials.

Provide deep substrate, a hide/starter burrow, some anchor points outside the hide/burrow entrance, and water dish.
 

ColeopteraC

Arachnoknight
Active Member
Joined
Mar 8, 2020
Messages
279
I have seen a number of keepers suggest a semi-arboreal setup
Semi arboreal is a non existent term, it’s just a strange sub-category used for heavy webbers or T’s that web up loads of anchor points. If it’s not adept to a fully arboreal lifestyle it shouldn’t be considered arboreal in anyway.

I wouldn’t worry about it, the setup you have now looks great!
 

Asgiliath

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
May 4, 2019
Messages
339
P. murinus and C. lividus were my first two OW's. Mine usually retreats rather than stands their ground. It might just be a wuss 😉 but I haven't seen a single threat pose.

My biggest concern when dealing with OW's is their speed. You need to be able to stay calm and work slowly. I would much rather have a spider stand still and slap and bite rather than run around like crazy. In that case, just keep your hands out of the way and you're good.

(I've said it before, but I don't understand the OBT's reputation of being the Big Bad of the hobby. Mine is a kitten in comparison to my Asians!)
 

DomGom TheFather

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2020
Messages
58
I think that being bolty is why most people hate on old worlds. To me it is what makes them fun.
They know they are in prison.
Any rehousing or even opening of the container should be done in a room where they can't get lost.
 

DomGom TheFather

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2020
Messages
58
Here we go.
I think that the obt is a great beginner species for someone getting into old worlds.
They are readily available in the hobby and thus cheap, they are incredibly hardy, and just the fact that it is the dreaded obt will make that person extra cautious before they ,someday, realize "oh, wow. These guys are extra special."
If you want to give full attention and you have the will then once you go baboon you never go back.
 

CJJon

Arachnobaron
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Oct 28, 2018
Messages
413
OBT = Fraidy-Cats

Go slow and be deliberate in your actions. Also, you have the luxury of time. If during a rehouse any T starts to get difficult to deal with, wait. I've cupped spiders that have bolted and then just left them cupped for a while to let them calm down. I've also given up a rehouse and tried another day. Don't push it.

One more thing to add - practice. Get yourself all set up and do some dry-runs without any T's. Go through the steps several times. Get familiar with your tools and perfect your technique BEFORE you go poking at a fast defensive T.
 

CJJon

Arachnobaron
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Oct 28, 2018
Messages
413
I think that being bolty is why most people hate on old worlds. To me it is what makes them fun.
They know they are in prison.
Any rehousing or even opening of the container should be done in a room where they can't get lost.
It can make them easier to deal with too. I'd rather have a T bolt right out of an enclosure for me rather than grabbing hold and not wanting to come out. As long as you have your whits about you and plan for a fast escape, it really is easier.
 

Mini8leggedfreak

Arachnoknight
Joined
Dec 21, 2017
Messages
266
From what I understand OBTs have had a bad name because people would put them in a shoe box enclosure that is 6” tall and wonder why the T wants to bite when they rip the lid off.
If they have somewhere to hide they will hid. What spider would take on a human unless they have to??
 

The Grym Reaper

Arachnoreaper
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Jul 19, 2016
Messages
3,568
From what I understand OBTs have had a bad name because people would put them in a shoe box enclosure that is 6” tall and wonder why the T wants to bite when they rip the lid off.
If they have somewhere to hide they will hid. What spider would take on a human unless they have to??
Basically, people try to set them up like C. cyaneopubescens and wonder why they have a perpetually hyper-defensive jack in the box. Same thing with C. huahini. Given sufficient sub and a decent hide they'll burrow and hardly give you any trouble because they'll just dart into their burrows when disturbed (and only get crabby if you literally poke around in their burrows). When they don't have that they effectively treat the entire enclosure as their burrow and immediately either bolt or get defensive as soon as you open the enclosure because you're essentially poking around in their "burrow" and they have no other options besides fight or flee.
 
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