taking care of injured hummingbird.

lalberts9310

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Two days ago, I was able to save a humming bird from my grandpa's cat. Luckily the poor guy was not fatally injured, but the cat managed to rip off half of his right wing. I got the wound to stop bleeding, and i read on the internet from a couple of sources that you should feed them sugar water. 1/4 parts of sugar per 1 part water. This will be his second night with me, and he's doing extremely well. I give him sugar water through a straw, a little at a time to prevent drowning.

I doubt that he'll ever fly again, as he has lost more than half of his right wing. But I'm determined to keep him alive until i'm able to find a rehabilitation centre that will be able to give him the care he needs.

I'm temporarily keeping him in a ventilated shoe box, with an old shirt to keep him warm during night.

Does anyone have experience I caring for an injured hummingbird? I would like those to share their experiences with me, as I have grown quite fond of the little guy.

Here's the little sweety pie:
 

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louise f

Arachnoangel
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Jul 8, 2012
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Aww what a cute lil guy, nice saving friend. I hope he makes it. <3 I wish i could have given you some info on how to care for it, but i dont. :(

I hope someone is experienced with this, and can offer you some help <3 Good luck with that sweet little guy <3 :kiss::)
 

Ran

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You are doing an honorable deed! I enjoy watching hummingbirds and find them fascinating...demonstrative little creatures! I believe you are giving him the best care possible and I hope there is a rehab place that will care for him for the rest of his life.
 

lalberts9310

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You are doing an honorable deed! I enjoy watching hummingbirds and find them fascinating...demonstrative little creatures! I believe you are giving him the best care possible and I hope there is a rehab place that will care for him for the rest of his life.
They are quite rare here in the region we're living, this is the second one I ever saw. He's third day with me, and still alive and well :)
 

Ran

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Glad to hear is is failing well in your care! He is very blessed to be in your care most importantly :)
 

The Snark

Dumpster Fire of the Gods
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I rescued a hummingbird many years ago. It stayed around for about 2 weeks then recovered and left. All I remember: they do better on fructose. Sucrose is like junk food and can shorten their lives. They also can die of fright. I was warned by an animal expert to give it a safe place where it cannot see any potential predators. As I also had a hawk rescuee I kept them outside at opposite ends of the house where they could not possibly see each other.
Let your heart as well as your mind be your guide in it's keeping and protection. Best of luck!

Oh yes. It may also like a drink of plain water now and then.
 
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viper69

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Two days ago, I was able to save a humming bird from my grandpa's cat. Luckily the poor guy was not fatally injured, but the cat managed to rip off half of his right wing. I got the wound to stop bleeding, and i read on the internet from a couple of sources that you should feed them sugar water. 1/4 parts of sugar per 1 part water. This will be his second night with me, and he's doing extremely well. I give him sugar water through a straw, a little at a time to prevent drowning.

I doubt that he'll ever fly again, as he has lost more than half of his right wing. But I'm determined to keep him alive until i'm able to find a rehabilitation centre that will be able to give him the care he needs.

I'm temporarily keeping him in a ventilated shoe box, with an old shirt to keep him warm during night.

Does anyone have experience I caring for an injured hummingbird? I would like those to share their experiences with me, as I have grown quite fond of the little guy.

Here's the little sweety pie:
They don't just eat nectar.

See here http://www.hummingbirdsociety.org/feeding-hummingbirds/
 

Ranitomeya

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Oct 11, 2012
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That's not a hummingbird, it's a sunbird. Hummingbirds are only native to the Americas.

Nectar is only a source of carbohydrates for energy, but they require a source of protein to survive. Hummingbirds feed on a lot of nectar for the energy of flight and small insects to get their protein. Sunbirds feed on pollen, fruit, and insects in addition to nectar.
 

N1ghtFire

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Joined
Jun 17, 2016
Messages
173
Two days ago, I was able to save a humming bird from my grandpa's cat. Luckily the poor guy was not fatally injured, but the cat managed to rip off half of his right wing. I got the wound to stop bleeding, and i read on the internet from a couple of sources that you should feed them sugar water. 1/4 parts of sugar per 1 part water. This will be his second night with me, and he's doing extremely well. I give him sugar water through a straw, a little at a time to prevent drowning.

I doubt that he'll ever fly again, as he has lost more than half of his right wing. But I'm determined to keep him alive until i'm able to find a rehabilitation centre that will be able to give him the care he needs.

I'm temporarily keeping him in a ventilated shoe box, with an old shirt to keep him warm during night.

Does anyone have experience I caring for an injured hummingbird? I would like those to share their experiences with me, as I have grown quite fond of the little guy.

Here's the little sweety pie:
I have cared for an injured hummingburd before.. but that looks nothing like a hummingbird.. none that I have ever seen, at least. Humming birds are very small dont have as much of a curve in the beak. They need food almost constantly due to how much energy they burn while flying.
They are also very very quick and I'd be suprised if a cat could get hold of one, my cats stalk them at the feeder sometimes but stand absolutely no chance catching the fast little guys.
 

lalberts9310

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That's not a hummingbird, it's a sunbird. Hummingbirds are only native to the Americas.

Nectar is only a source of carbohydrates for energy, but they require a source of protein to survive. Hummingbirds feed on a lot of nectar for the energy of flight and small insects to get their protein. Sunbirds feed on pollen, fruit, and insects in addition to nectar.
Awesome!! Thanx very much for the clarification :). Adding fruit to his diet as well from now on. What type of insects do you recommend me feeding it?
 

lalberts9310

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I have cared for an injured hummingburd before.. but that looks nothing like a hummingbird.. none that I have ever seen, at least. Humming birds are very small dont have as much of a curve in the beak. They need food almost constantly due to how much energy they burn while flying.
They are also very very quick and I'd be suprised if a cat could get hold of one, my cats stalk them at the feeder sometimes but stand absolutely no chance catching the fast little guys.
This one is quite fast indeed, and tiny too.. I think it might have already been injured prior to the cat finding it..
 

Ranitomeya

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I have no idea what kind of insects it might eat, but you could try small, flying insects.
 

lalberts9310

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Well, I'm quite sad to say that the poor guy didn't make it.... I tried my utmost best to keep him alive, and yet I failed.. :( I had high hopes that he'll pull through, he was so strong...... I'm heartbroken :drowning:
 

schmiggle

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I'm so sorry. You didn't fail, you did your absolute best, and I'm sure he died much more comfortably in your care than he would have otherwise.
 

Aviara

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Jun 26, 2012
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I just bumped into this and wanted to add some information. This comes from years spent volunteering under licensed wildlife rehabilitators. Birds are extremely sensitive to some of the bacteria cats commonly carry in their saliva and on their claws. Any time a bird is GBC - got by cat - it needs antibiotics, preferably within 24 hours of the attack, to have any good chance of survival. I'm not familiar with this species, but any hummingbird with wing damage that is unlikely to regain flight capability is gently euthanized in a rehabilitation situation. It's unnecessary to drag on the suffering of a bird who will never fly again and therefore can never be released. Whereas some disabled birds are maintained under education permits, hummingbirds are not used as educational ambassadors. They simply do not do well in captivity. I do not know if sunbirds are the same.

In a rehabilitation setting, these birds need a balanced formula that provides all of their nutritional needs. These birds have extremely fast metabolisms and, especially when injured, need balanced nutrition to recover. Any time an injured bird has a wound from a dog or cat and any time a bird has damage to their wings, they need a professional wildlife rehabilitator who can provide the proper medicine and care to prevent infections and work to regain the bird's flight abilities.

I know you tried your best, but I highly recommend you locate your nearest wildlife rehabilitator and next time you find injured or orphaned wildlife, get them to this rehabilitator as soon as possible. Your individual care vs. a wildlife facility is like comparing a passerby with a first aid kit to a well staffed hospital. No matter how well intentioned you are, you just can't replace the experience and equipment professionals have at their disposal. Even in cases where the birds are brought to rehabilitation facilities to be euthanized, it is in order to save the birds a drawn-out death.
 
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