tailess whip scorpions

kenzie

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We are about to get some tailless whip scorpions and are pretty excited. Were getting the tanzanian tailless. Can anyone who has successfully raised these give us some advice on their care? Like, are they totally communal, or is seperate cages better? Do they like it more humid or dry, cold or hot? Feeding and behavior? Questions like these and any other you see fit that would help us would be much appreciated. Thanks.
 

skippy

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humid and warm. don't keep them together unless you only want one. make sure there is area to climb on as they have to molt while hanging.

that's all the important stuff i can think of;)
 

JesseD

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The only time I had one eat the other was when I had a male and female together and the male molted. She devoured him when she had the opportunity. Feed them large prey items if possible. I have a book with a photo of a S.A. species eating a bat. (probably a tiny one, but a bat just the same). I'm sure young growing amblypygids would eat each other if they needed too as well.
 

J Morningstar

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I have had 6 from about second molt on together and though a huge variance in size since they were all siblings they actually stayed together rather well, has been 6 or more months. But all convention say they will become cannibalistic after 12 months.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070312152201.htm

also check out:

http://amblypygi.com/

I would love to believe with a big enough enclosure and a good set up I could avoid the cannibalism too, I am not too hopeful. I am designing a tank wiyth 6 "chambers" and a way to get air through all in one huge tank. I already have sexually dimorfic male and female. So all molts have went really well. Keep them in a upper humidity range and plenty of Verticle space..they need it to molt, and it's what they prefer to move like.
One HUGE thing though. They are VERY vonerable during molts!!!!!!!!!! I lost my favorite one (and ONLY one at the time) to a ass**le Cricket with a vengance complex, and that was at full size. look before you feed!if they are in the upside down posture, looking different from their normal coloration, and or looking like they might be, don't feed them!
Also, ahem, cutting the back legs and ovipositor off your crickets...may be a good idea, it slows them down and limits crickets breeding in your tank. Certianly makes them easier prey.
 
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kenzie

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What about mature male vs female size and look? In tarantulas the trend is that females are huge and pretty while the boys are skimmpy and ugly and much smaller. Is it the same thing with these guys?
 

Banshee05

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We are about to get some tailless whip scorpions and are pretty excited. Were getting the tanzanian tailless. Can anyone who has successfully raised these give us some advice on their care? Like, are they totally communal, or is seperate cages better? Do they like it more humid or dry, cold or hot? Feeding and behavior? Questions like these and any other you see fit that would help us would be much appreciated. Thanks.
Hi,
Damon diadema are in juvenile stages completely social. then before they molt to adulthood you should seperate them, afterwoods you can put them together again.
Tanzania is a dry-semi humid place, but they live in caves and under barks during the day. So put 27°C, 60% humidity. you can dry out the ground every week, this doesn' matter, they raise very fast, and withihn 1 1/2 year you can get the next generation.
 

J Morningstar

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They take 6-10 months to look sexually mature. the biggest way to tell a male from a female is the male has darker longer front limbs than the female, his protrude past the first bend of the second pair of legs and the females does not, and it seemes the females may be a bit "thicker".
 

Chris_Skeleton

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What about mature male vs female size and look? In tarantulas the trend is that females are huge and pretty while the boys are skimmpy and ugly and much smaller. Is it the same thing with these guys?
Since when did the male tarantulas tend to be ugly? There are many species that show sexual dimorphism and gain amazing colors such as P. cancerides, Xenesthis sp., Pamphobeteus sp., G. rosea, and others. Most just stay the coloration as the female so males don't tend to be ugly.
 

Moltar

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If you put a mature pair together and keep them properly they will probably give you a colony fairly easily. At least that's what I've heard. Maybe a pair of adults of the same sex would attack each other but within the confines of mated pair/colony they are fairly sociable.

Watching them hunt is awesome. They are amazing with those wisker-legs!
 

zonbonzovi

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Just a note: I did have 3 females together at one time, 2 full grown and the other slightly smaller. The smallest was found with a dime sized hole eaten out of her abdomen(not in molt), despite being well fed. There did seem to be some dominance issues as the largest female would "chase" the others away if they came on to her preferred cork slab.
 

Michiel

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Just another note: The common name "tailless whipscorpions" can be rather confusing, Amblypygi= whip spiders, Uropygi= whip scorpions, sou you might want to consider using those names.
 

Banshee05

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Just another note: The common name "tailless whipscorpions" can be rather confusing, Amblypygi= whip spiders, Uropygi= whip scorpions, sou you might want to consider using those names.
BTW:
Uropygi (class Arachnida) = Thelyphonida and Schizomida
But i think we always talk about Thelyphonida
the common names are a little but confusing.
 

snakecollector

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We keep ours in a large group

We keep our adult Tailless Whips (D.Diadema) in a 45 gallon tote in a breeding colony. We keep egg crates, like are used for crickets, for hiding spots. Our females are giving birth regularly, we haven't had any eat each other. They can be terratorial but they don't get very physical during disputes. Once babies reach 2i we move them to a smaller tote, still communal, set up like the adults, basically a nursery. We feed them pin crickets.

We keep them fairly humid for molting purposes and feed them regularly a diet of 3/4 grown crickets. We did one time have an aggressive male that was going around a pulling the "feelers" off of the other whips. He got put in time out and eventually sold to a person that only wanted one.

John
 

Michiel

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BTW:
Uropygi (class Arachnida) = Thelyphonida and Schizomida
But i think we always talk about Thelyphonida
the common names are a little but confusing.
Forgot about the schizomids, you are right!

Regards, Michiel
 

Canth

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We keep our adult Tailless Whips (D.Diadema) in a 45 gallon tote in a breeding colony. We keep egg crates, like are used for crickets, for hiding spots. Our females are giving birth regularly, we haven't had any eat each other. They can be terratorial but they don't get very physical during disputes. Once babies reach 2i we move them to a smaller tote, still communal, set up like the adults, basically a nursery. We feed them pin crickets.

We keep them fairly humid for molting purposes and feed them regularly a diet of 3/4 grown crickets. We did one time have an aggressive male that was going around a pulling the "feelers" off of the other whips. He got put in time out and eventually sold to a person that only wanted one.

John
I'd be interested in seeing a picture of these set ups. It sounds pretty interesting
 

kenzie

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They take 6-10 months to look sexually mature. the biggest way to tell a male from a female is the male has darker longer front limbs than the female, his protrude past the first bend of the second pair of legs and the females does not, and it seemes the females may be a bit "thicker".
So does the males front limbs extend farther than the females from birth, or is that something that takes place when he matures or approaches maturity?
 

J Morningstar

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So does the males front limbs extend farther than the females from birth, or is that something that takes place when he matures or approaches maturity?
It happens after 6 months or so...some of them show signs before but not clearly.
 

catfishrod69

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well i just threw a couple crickets in with him,.....and nothing....so i thought mabye the crickets were hopping away from him, so i did some surgery on crickets legs, and nothing, then i held a cricket to him and he pinched at it then got freaked out....then i switched to some blatta latteralis roaches, and now im still waiting....

What and how are you feeding them?
 
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