T. kahlenbergi blocked off in hide

Sgt7212

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 26, 2020
Messages
30
On February 26th, I purchased a T. kahlenbergi 2.5-3" juvenile from a local shop. Admittedly, at the time, I had no idea what I was doing. On the advice and recommendation of the local shop, I housed it in a 10 gallon critter cage, which is a glass tank and has a locking mesh top and 4 inches of substrate, cork bark hide and water dish. Some of you will ask for photos, but I know the set up is wrong and realized that rather quickly.

I had planned on correcting the set up the following morning, by moving it to a smaller enclosure with appropriate level of substrate. The problem is, after it explored the enclosure the first night, when I woke up at 530am on Feb 27th, it had made a burrow under the cork bark and sealed itself off. Since that time, I have left it alone and only opened the enclosure to dampen a corner of the substrate and ensure the water dish is full at all times.

It is now over a month with no change. From reading here, I know this is not unusual and T's know how to be T's better than we do. I've read of T's staying off the grid for months at a time.

Is there ever a point in time that it would be prudent to check on the T? or do I just stay on course, indefinitely, as I have been?

I ask because my similarly sized C. cyaneopubescens molted the night before last. While it has largely stayed in it's web tunnel, this morning I put a few drops of water just outside and she sensed it and came up to drink. I repeated that a few times and she has drank everything I've offered.

That got me thinking. I know molting is a very taxing and stressful time and it takes a lot out of a T. My GBB was obviously thirsty. Could my T. kahlenbergi be in any danger?

The obvious answer is, if it wants water, it would probably come out looking for it. I do understand that, but I am still fairly new to T's and just looking for a little reassurance/ peace of mind.
 

vancwa

Arachnoknight
Active Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2011
Messages
237
Yes, leave it alone. Make sure the water dish is near the opening of burrow so it won't have to venture far to find water after emergence.
 

Vanisher

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 2, 2004
Messages
2,543
On February 26th, I purchased a T. kahlenbergi 2.5-3" juvenile from a local shop. Admittedly, at the time, I had no idea what I was doing. On the advice and recommendation of the local shop, I housed it in a 10 gallon critter cage, which is a glass tank and has a locking mesh top and 4 inches of substrate, cork bark hide and water dish. Some of you will ask for photos, but I know the set up is wrong and realized that rather quickly.

I had planned on correcting the set up the following morning, by moving it to a smaller enclosure with appropriate level of substrate. The problem is, after it explored the enclosure the first night, when I woke up at 530am on Feb 27th, it had made a burrow under the cork bark and sealed itself off. Since that time, I have left it alone and only opened the enclosure to dampen a corner of the substrate and ensure the water dish is full at all times.

It is now over a month with no change. From reading here, I know this is not unusual and T's know how to be T's better than we do. I've read of T's staying off the grid for months at a time.

Is there ever a point in time that it would be prudent to check on the T? or do I just stay on course, indefinitely, as I have been?

I ask because my similarly sized C. cyaneopubescens molted the night before last. While it has largely stayed in it's web tunnel, this morning I put a few drops of water just outside and she sensed it and came up to drink. I repeated that a few times and she has drank everything I've offered.

That got me thinking. I know molting is a very taxing and stressful time and it takes a lot out of a T. My GBB was obviously thirsty. Could my T. kahlenbergi be in any danger?

The obvious answer is, if it wants water, it would probably come out looking for it. I do understand that, but I am still fairly new to T's and just looking for a little reassurance/ peace of mind.
The cage is way too big area and tall wise and has wrong ventilation top. Dont take petshop employees advises. When it has moulted, rehouse it to something much more appropriate. There are many threads about fitting enclosure on this board
 

Sgt7212

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 26, 2020
Messages
30
Thanks for the reassurance! I have a ball python who didn't take food from Thanksgiving until the end of June one year. The difference was I could see it every day and knew it wasn't losing weight, etc... so it didn't play mind tricks on me.

The cage is way too big area and tall wise and has wrong ventilation top. Dont take petshop employees advises. When it has moulted, rehouse it to something much more appropriate. There are many threads about fitting enclosure on this board
Agreed. As I mentioned, I realized that immediately but have not been able to change it because it sealed itself off the first night I had it. I've been waiting on it to emerge so I can correct the husbandry. My other T's are housed correctly.
 

Sgt7212

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 26, 2020
Messages
30
normal behavior for a T that will molt
Thanks... and I did know that, even before I asked the question. This covid-19, out of work, stuck in the house and trouble finding things to occupy my time other than constantly looking at my T's in their enclosures, coupled with the fact my C. cyaneopubescens (that is about the same size as my T. kahlenbergi) molted last Sunday in mere hours and has been outside of it's web tunnel a few times since then, just got my mind wandering. I know they are all different and they don't follow a specific set of instructions or timeline for molting. I just got stuck in my head a bit.
 

GreggsTees

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 15, 2019
Messages
0
In my experience with these guys, burrow all the time. No matter what size I have had. Let it be it will be fine
 
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