T is in a death curl/ what is the longest death curl you've seen?

gypsy cola

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 16, 2014
Messages
195
Hello,

My nhandu coloratovillosus has been in a death curl for about 6 months. I believe this to be my fault. It all happened when I picked up a pothos plant for her enclosure from Lowes. I am assuming she came into contact with chemicals.

The plant has been removed and the spider has been rehoused with a large water dish. She drinks water fine. When she is not in a death curl she walks around very wobbly... like she is tipsy and hungover at the same time. I catch her on her back from time to time as well.

Other than providing her with plenty of water, placing her in the water dish (not fully submerging), and keeping her environment as stress free as possible. Any other suggestions, or do I need to just simply wait this out?

She also has not eaten once since I first got her in Oct. Picked her up at an expo, she is about 4-5 inch DLS (estimate). No funky stuff around the bum or mouth. No visible injuries. Fangs are fine and pretty.

I am open to suggestions and will reply promptly as possible to questions.

Side note: what is the longest time period you have ever seen a T in a death curl?
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,712
Well, the fact that she has no eaten since October it's quite unusual... they are good eaters, unlike a G.rosea. Maybe you're right, and it's your fault for that plant, but still... anyway, I suggest you to continue this way, in full "water", trying to offer, and of course remove if uneaten, a cricket sometime.
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
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Jan 19, 2014
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12,030
I had a poisoning issue last year when a neighbor sprayed his lawn...it was brutally hot and I happened to have the windows open that night...anyway, several of my ts suffered from this exposure (which is probably similar to what yours endured). Several perished in the first 72 hours, but there were many that acted like yours...lethargic would be an understatement and movement when it occurred was very unsettling. The good news is that all the ones that survived long term, eventually recovered following a molt or sometimes 2.....my striata was worrying my for 2 full molt cycles....however all these long term survivers are still with me today. I did have luck holding wax worms in front of them (through the ventilation) and occasionally they would actually eat, although I felt like throwing a small party every time one did it was so infrequent.

Good luck, like chris said, this is usually a positively voracious eating species.
 
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Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,712
Side note: what is the longest time period you have ever seen a T in a death curl?
Once a C.cyaneopubescens of a friend died due to (99,99% I'm sure of that) a WC cricket that him, in pretty full 'tard mode, caught in a vineyard near here, in the hills.

Now, a note: in that little village, an helluva (and I say an helluva) of people died pretty young (50 to 70) of tumors, still today, due to that spraying rapture poop in their vineyards.

'GBB' died after a week, more or less, not anymore able to walk properly, in full semi death curl most always.
 

Sana

Arachnoprince
Joined
Oct 26, 2014
Messages
1,143
I would think that at the moment the biggest thing is going to be getting the tarantula to the next molt. I would try some different feeders and maybe prekilled. I'm going on the theory that when I'm sick I have a hard time going to the kitchen to make food but if someone sits it in front of me so I can eat it when I'm ready I'm more likely to eat.
 
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