T. blondi spiderling care?

poppaJT

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 10, 2010
Messages
47
Hi everyone, I'm thinking about getting a T. blondi spiderling to add to my tarantula collection, I was just wondering what their heat/humidity needs are, how aggressive they are, and do they climb? Thanks!!
 

Arachnos482

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 12, 2010
Messages
50
Well i must say i have not had the privilege of owning one yet, but from what i've read they need temp 75-82°F, humidity 75-80%, they are rather aggressive and have plenty u- hairs, they are terrestrial, so the floor space is more important than the height of the enclosure, hope this helps.
 

webbedone

Arachnobaron
Joined
Aug 27, 2010
Messages
410
They are from northern and north easter south america. They are found in tropical rain forests on slopes and hillsides with reasonable drainage and above the high water mark in areas that flood. So having said that you want about 80% humidity pretty much at all times(misting or injecting water into substrate with a serynge) and roughly 75-82F temperatures make sure DO NOT exceed 82F in risks of dessication remember cooler is better than hotter. Depending on the size if 2" or bigger provide a little shallow water dish i'd say get some condoment cups(like the ones coleslaw comes in) cut them down to half size, get some "zoomed" river pebbles (i boil mine in a pot to elimite any bacteria or parasites that may or may not be left on them from a package) and fill the cup with them, pour water so it just barely covers the pebbles. if the leg span is under 2 inches put a patch of forest moss in(sold almost in any self respecting pet store) and mist that area twice a week so that the spidelings can drink the droplets of water. Feed with pin head crickets twice a week, remove any uneaten items next day after feeding.
Repeat until you have a nose bleed and the spiderlings are big enough to relocate

Roming room is more important then hight of the enclosure

T.blondi has a defensive demeanor but will not hesitate to spray hairs in your face and then run away
 

poppaJT

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 10, 2010
Messages
47
Ehh.. All I got right now is a G. rosea, and I have a Texas Brown coming soon. I plan on getting more!!
 

Fran

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 8, 2007
Messages
1,533
They are from northern and north easter south america. They are found in tropical rain forests on slopes and hillsides with reasonable drainage and above the high water mark in areas that flood. So having said that you want about 80% humidity pretty much at all times(misting or injecting water into substrate with a serynge) and roughly 75-82F temperatures make sure DO NOT exceed 82F in risks of dessication remember cooler is better than hotter. Depending on the size if 2" or bigger provide a little shallow water dish i'd say get some condoment cups(like the ones coleslaw comes in) cut them down to half size, get some "zoomed" river pebbles (i boil mine in a pot to elimite any bacteria or parasites that may or may not be left on them from a package) and fill the cup with them, pour water so it just barely covers the pebbles. if the leg span is under 2 inches put a patch of forest moss in(sold almost in any self respecting pet store) and mist that area twice a week so that the spidelings can drink the droplets of water. Feed with pin head crickets twice a week, remove any uneaten items next day after feeding.
Repeat until you have a nose bleed and the spiderlings are big enough to relocate

Roming room is more important then hight of the enclosure

T.blondi has a defensive demeanor but will not hesitate to spray hairs in your face and then run away
85F is an all around good temp for Theraphosa. Making sure they have PLENTY of water and moist substrate.

In the estado amazonas (Venezuela ) the average temps all year are around 28-30C and 90% humidity
 

JC

Arachnolort
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 15, 2009
Messages
1,423
Feed with pin head crickets twice a week, remove any uneaten items next day after feeding.
They don't necessarily require pin-head crickets. Medium crickets or even chopped-up big ones will work too. Pin-heads are sometimes hard to come by anyway, because you may need to order them on-line. You can also try mealworms or waxworms, but roaches work best of all.
 

webbedone

Arachnobaron
Joined
Aug 27, 2010
Messages
410
well yea i mean you can use anything starting with pinheads allthe way through mean worms, maggots, flightless fruit flies, roach nymps etc.
Pin heads are the easiest to aquire imo unless you have your own colonies of feeder insects
 

Fran

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 8, 2007
Messages
1,533
well yea i mean you can use anything starting with pinheads allthe way through mean worms, maggots, flightless fruit flies, roach nymps etc.
Pin heads are the easiest to aquire imo unless you have your own colonies of feeder insects
T blondi slings comes out at an nch, ans after a molt you will have a 2 incher... full grown crickets.
 

kenzie

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 9, 2009
Messages
92
Most other slings will need small food such as pin heads, but the Blondi slings are huge! Just to be safe you could use medium sized feeders, but I'm pretty sure they can handle big food. We have a Theraphosa sp. (Burgundy) sling, and we keep it in a room around 80 degrees F. Nothing too special needed for these guys. We had issues with some WC big adults, but if you buy CB then I think you should be fine. Good luck!
 
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