T.blondi ( is it truly the largest tarantula?)

Nightstalker47

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Hello fellow hobbyists,

I have always been very interested in the large fast growing species. So I've got plenty of the big new world terrestrial species such as : T.Stirmi, A .Geniculata, L.parahybana, L. Difficilis, N. Chromatus and P. Cancerides.

But one spider I don't own is the true T. Blondi because they are super expensive here in Canada and they are so similar to the stirmi. Do they really get any bigger? From what I've read it's the T. Blondi and T. Apophysis that get the biggest. Is there any truth to this? Is it worth buying at 350$ a sling? I have a 5 inch female stirmi thats grown like a weed and she's arguably the my favorite spider species in terms of growth and feeding response. So to all who have experienced within the genus I would love to hear if your stirmi got as big as your other theraphosa.

Thanks and good day
 

KezyGLA

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I am not fond of Theraphosa, though IMO I think they all usually max the same. Apart from the recorded exeptions which have been monsters. Stirmi is underdog but would you pay the money for something that would most likely grow to the same size of your stirmi?
 

Nightstalker47

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Yeah I've continued to look around and some say they get bigger then T.Blondi, I used to watch some of Robc on YouTube and he had a 12 inch stirmi, wich he thought was blondi but wasn't. Anyway I wouldn't want to pay top dollar for blondi now that I see the only real difference is their hairs, apophysis is a different story since they are quite different in appearance. Thanks for your reply if anyone here has had theraphosa mature under their care please chime in let's see what the most common sizes are.
 

Nightstalker47

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id like to see a 12" T. blondi.. :rofl: ive read that 9-10" is the norm.
You and me both,
id like to see a 12" T. blondi.. :rofl: ive read that 9-10" is the norm.
So for a common spider to hit 10 inches I don't think 12 is very far off. I for one belive that the size of your spider greatly depends on how often you feed it, and that it's living in a good environment, with minimu stress on the animal. My stirmi went from a sling to 5 inches in months and only 4 molts. But I feed her almost everyday, I've noticed this because I bought slings and had them a few months and they grew fast, I went to pick up some more a few months later and they hadn't grown at all, my slings were way bigger. I think it comes down to genetics and the care you provided.

T
You and me both,

So for a common spider to hit 10 inches I don't think 12 is very far off. I for one belive that the size of your spider greatly depends on how often you feed it, and that it's living in a good environment, with minimu stress on the animal. My stirmi went from a sling to 5 inches in months and only 4 molts. But I feed her almost everyday, I've noticed this because I bought slings and had them a few months and they grew fast, I went to pick up some more a few months later and they hadn't grown at all, my slings were way bigger. I think it comes down to genetics and the care you provided.
The slings in question were P. ornata and L. Parahybana
 
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Venom1080

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You and me both,

So for a common spider to hit 10 inches I don't think 12 is very far off. I for one belive that the size of your spider greatly depends on how often you feed it, and that it's living in a good environment, with minimu stress on the animal. My stirmi went from a sling to 5 inches in months and only 4 molts. But I feed her almost everyday, I've noticed this because I bought slings and had them a few months and they grew fast, I went to pick up some more a few months later and they hadn't grown at all, my slings were way bigger. I think it comes down to genetics and the care you provided.
the growth rate is determined by temps and feeding frequency, but the max size is not. not to mention gender also plays a huge role.
 

EulersK

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So for a common spider to hit 10 inches I don't think 12 is very far off.
I don't know, that's a pretty big jump. Two inches may not seem like a lot, but that equates to a full 20% larger specimen... and 10" is already considered a very large specimen.

As an analogy to demonstrate what I'm saying, that would be like a six foot tall man saying that an extra foot taller wouldn't be a huge difference.
 

Nightstalker47

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the growth rate is determined by temps and feeding frequency, but the max size is not. not to mention gender also plays a huge role.
And how can you be so sure that feeding doesn't influence the max size. Seems your contradicting yourself, so by that logic my spiderson max growth would not be influenced by how much I fed it? I disagree with you there, in order to grow the animal needs to absorb matter from his prey. So if I had two spiders of the same species and fed one more I can guarantee it would surpass the other in size. In fact I've been conducting this very experiment with a pair of male N.colorativollosus one is fed weekly the other every other day and boy is one of them bigger.

I don't know, that's a pretty big jump. Two inches may not seem like a lot, but that equates to a full 20% larger specimen... and 10" is already considered a very large specimen.

As an analogy to demonstrate what I'm saying, that would be like a six foot tall man saying that an extra foot taller wouldn't be a huge difference.
I understand your point and there is definitely some truth to it. Genetics make a difference, no B. Smithi will get to to a 10 inch legspan but every animal has a certain growth potential and there is no way of knowing if you provided the necessary resources for it to hit that potential, if you understand my point. Most people drastically under feed their spiders especially in the sling stage. And I've found that the more they are fed the larger they grow between molts.
 
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8legfreak

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I don't know, that's a pretty big jump. Two inches may not seem like a lot, but that equates to a full 20% larger specimen... and 10" is already considered a very large specimen.

As an analogy to demonstrate what I'm saying, that would be like a six foot tall man saying that an extra foot taller wouldn't be a huge difference.
In my experience, post-molt growth of about 25% isn't uncommon, so that 10" T may be only one molt away...
 

Nightstalker47

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In my experience, post-molt growth of about 25% isn't uncommon, so that 10" T may be only one molt away...
With you 100 %

I also think a T has a limited amount of molts in its life cycle and the more it grows from each molt the bigger the mature T.
 
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Ungoliant

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I don't know, that's a pretty big jump. Two inches may not seem like a lot, but that equates to a full 20% larger specimen... and 10" is already considered a very large specimen.
I think a lot of these "monsters" can be explained by differences in measuring techniques -- combined with exaggeration. (Notice that you rarely see pictures of these unusually large Ts with a ruler.)

For example, DLS -- it sounds self-explanatory, but are you measuring at a more natural (for the tarantula) posture or with legs stretched to the limit? It's hard to get a live tarantula to stretch as much as you want, so I think a lot of people measure at a more natural posture and "estimate" what it would be if stretched to the limit. It's when they're estimating that exaggeration (intentional or not) comes into play.
 
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8legfreak

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I also think a T has a limited amount of molts in its life cycle and the more it grows from each molt the bigger the mature T.
That theory could be possible... I tend to feed as much as they want, but not allowing it to get to a butt-dragging ready-to-burst situation. They usually stop eating in prep for the next molt anyway.
 

Venom1080

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And how can you be so sure that feeding doesn't influence the max size. Seems your contradicting yourself, so by that logic my spiderson max growth would not be influenced by how much I fed it? I disagree with you there, in order to grow the animal needs to absorb matter from his prey. So if I had two spiders of the same species and fed one more I can guarantee it would surpass the other in size. In fact I've been conducting this very experiment with a pair of male N.colorativollosus one is fed weekly the other every other day and boy is one of them bigger.
feeding only influences how fast that max size is reached. temps+more feeding= faster growth, not bigger max size. they also have unlimited molts in their lives, scorpions do not, but tarantulas certainly do.
 

Rittdk01

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^^^^you're not gonna measure in a natural position. I have a t stirmi that had a molt measure 10". I pinned the molt in a shadow box and had it fully stretched out. 10" is an insanely huge spider, especially to anyone seeing their first tarantula. T blondi are much more delicate and unforgiving where husbandry is concerned. I would not pay the money and honestly, wouldnt take on the additional care requirements of the blondi over your stirmi.
 

Nightstalker47

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feeding only influences how fast that max size is reached. temps+more feeding= faster growth, not bigger max size. they also have unlimited molts in their lives, scorpions do not, but tarantulas certainly do.
So if I own two males from the same egg sac and I feed one much more, wich I do like I said before (one is fed once a week and the other every other day) a pair of male N. Colorativollosus . So when the bigger one hooks out, wich he may do first, you think the sibling will reach the same size? Even after if he molts later your telling me he isn't going to be larger then the sibling ? Oh and apparently hes going to molt infinitely lol.

There's a reason that many spiders mature out smaller then others and it's not only the rate of growth but by consequence how often it's fed.

I recently brought a male N. Chromatus to a reptile expo in november at the holiday inn and Jon3800 saw it and couldn't believe it's size. He said his was half the size. Anyway you clearly aren't thinking this one through, feeding most definitely Influences the max size of the T.

Since when did they have infinite molts? That's ridiculous, they aren't immortal. Would be cool if they were, even females die eventually it's called lifespan. I don't mean to start a debate but I can't understand how you disagree.

^^^^you're not gonna measure in a natural position. I have a t stirmi that had a molt measure 10". I pinned the molt in a shadow box and had it fully stretched out. 10" is an insanely huge spider, especially to anyone seeing their first tarantula. T blondi are much more delicate and unforgiving where husbandry is concerned. I would not pay the money and honestly, wouldnt take on the additional care requirements of the blondi over your stirmi.
Wow that's a huge T, you must be a good keeper thanks but I haven't had any issues with the stirmi I was prepared for the spider had read a lot about them. All they need is good cross ventilation, moist soil, filled water dish and lots of food. I did hear that T. Blondi is more delicate and the price/spider ratio is a little overwhelming.
thanks for the help
 
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Venom1080

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So if I own two males from the same egg sac and I feed one much more, wich I do like I said before (one is fed once a week and the other every other day) a pair of male N. Colorativollosus . So when the bigger one hooks out, wich he may do first, you think the sibling will reach the same size? Even after if he molts later your telling me he isn't going to be larger then the sibling ? Oh and apparently hes going to molt infinitely lol.

There's a reason that many spiders mature out smaller then others and it's not only the rate of growth but by consequence how often it's fed.

I recently brought a male N. Chromatus to a reptile expo in november at the holiday inn and Jon3800 saw it and couldn't believe it's size. He said his was half the size. Anyway you clearly aren't thinking this one through, feeding most definitely Influences the max size of the T.

Since when did they have infinite molts? That's ridiculous, they aren't immortal. Would be cool if they were, even females die eventually it's called lifespan. I don't mean to start a debate but I can't understand how you disagree.
alrighty then, youre evidently set in your ways, wrong as they are, and youre not going to bother listening to more experienced keepers. im done wasting my time with you.
oh, and jon3800? lol hes a joke.
 

EulersK

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Since when did they have infinite molts? That's ridiculous, they aren't immortal. Would be cool if they were, even females die eventually it's called lifespan. I don't mean to start a debate but I can't understand how you disagree.
He never said they were immortal, only that they continue to molt until the day they die. Which is absolutely true. Females eventually reach a max size to where they don't grow at all with a molt. Males do indeed stop molting when they mature, and the ones that attempt another molt almost universally die in the process.

There's a reason that many spiders mature out smaller then others and it's not only the rate of growth but b
You could be right. Emphasis on the could, though. There is no research done on the long term effects on feeding. It's generally accepted in the hobby that the amount of food only affects growth rate, not max size.
 
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Nightstalker47

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alrighty then, youre evidently set in your ways, wrong as they are, and youre not going to bother listening to more experienced keepers. im done wasting my time with you.
oh, and jon3800? lol hes a joke.
Looks like your getting angry, no need for that. I'm only disagreeing with you over something that I've experienced first hand. And how can you say your more experienced you don't even know who I am. I may be new to arachnoboards but I'm not new to the hobby. And your dismissive attitude towards someone based on your preconceived notions about their "experience" is not to cool, it's both unfair and bad for the hobby. I don't agree with Jon's care for all his spiders but I wouldn't go out calling him names. He's a guy who is passionnate about Ts just like the rest of us. Only person being unreasonable right now is you. Guess your way ahead of me
 

Rittdk01

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Wow that's a huge T, you must be a good keeper thanks but I haven't had any issues with the stirmi I was prepared for the spider had read a lot about them. All they need is good cross ventilation, moist soil, filled water dish and lots of food. I did hear that T. Blondi is more delicate and the price/spider ratio is a little overwhelming.
thanks for the help
I'm sure u would do fine with a blondi if u are keeping a stirmi. I love theraphosa and thought I wanted all three. extra cost and care aren't worth it imo. I'm settling for the big girl I have now, and a stirmi sling I'm going to get when it warms up. To answer the original questionI have seen that apophysis is longest, but less bulk, and blondi is the biggest in weight. Once again, too similar to stirmi for all that $$$
 

Venom1080

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Looks like your getting angry, no need for that. I'm only disagreeing with you over something that I've experienced first hand. And how can you say your more experienced you don't even know who I am. I may be new to arachnoboards but I'm not new to the hobby. And your dismissive attitude towards someone based on your preconceived notions about their "experience" is not to cool, it's both unfair and bad for the hobby. I don't agree with Jon's care for all his spiders but I wouldn't go out calling him names. He's a guy who is passionnate about Ts just like the rest of us. Only person being unreasonable right now is you. Guess your way ahead of me
im going to assume some ones fairly new if they think tarantulas have a limited number of molts..
and what have you experienced first hand exactly? that spiders grow faster when fed more? wonder when i heard that before..:angelic:
jon3800s care is very poor, a joke is a nice way of putting it.
 
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