suggestions and information please

D Sherlod

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Dec 30, 2016
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There is an expo in mid April and am cosidering some new addititions. It's incredibly difficult to find even basic information. So I'm cosidering Psalmopoeus irminia, Psalmopoeus pulcher, Nhand tripepii,
Tapinauchenius gigas.
any thoughts or recommendations. ...Thanks
 

Goodlukwitthat

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I have 3 P. irminias ranging from Sub adult female to juvie and to small juvie. I keep them in my Animal Room that's been kept at 70 degrees for winter. Basic cork tube, half moon hide and some fake plants for a web anchor (although if you use a cork tube you aren't going to see the T unless they are hungry or out in the middle of the night wandering about). I keep a water dish full of water and about once weekly I will do a light misting of the enclosure. Mine have never had any issues with this set up.
 

Spidermolt

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Both of the psalmopoeus sp are NW arboreals. They require a little bit more humiduty, they're fast and are more likely to throw up a threat display but IMO as long as you've owned few arboreals for a while and are comfortable with them then I'd recommend thesw guys.
 

cold blood

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Irminia, while super cool, are virtual ghosts. You will see them less and less as they gain size.View media item 39074 I would suggest cambridgei, its the opposite, they hide less and less as they grow...every adult I have had has been out almost all the time....and they get bigger, grow even faster, and have even better app
etites.

I got tripeppii several months ago, and like the typical Nhandu (for me), they eat like little beasties and have grown at a great pace. They were maybe 3/4", actually less in Dec., nw they're all in deli cups and over an inch.

I've always wanted pulcher, my understanding is that they hide a lot as well, but not quite like an irminia. Langenbucheri and reduncus would be nice Psalmopeous finds.

As would be any species of Pamphobetus...hard to find, but you never know when they will pop up...same for Xenesthis sp.

Things you may find cheaply...C. darlingi/marshalli, N. chromatus or B. vagans...all worth grabbing a handful if theyre available on the cheap. Same could be said for albopilosum.


Any avic that's a good price, especially ones that are less popular or available.
 

Chris LXXIX

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Psalmopoeus pulcher, man. Blonde heads Ladies while a bit inflated are always sexy :cigar:

P.S

I suggest to buy also an Asian centipede :angelic:
 

mistertim

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Agree with @cold blood on Psalmos. P. cambridgei is probably a better choice than irminia. Don't get me wrong, I have a P. irminia and they're really cool spiders but they really are essentially ghosts; you're almost guaranteed to hardly ever see it. I don't have a Tap but I definitely want one in the future. I don't know exactly what you have now but just remember that Psalmos are super fast and do tend to have a bit of an attitude so are not especially inclined to take much s**t and Taps are generally thought to be the fastest tarantulas out there.
 

D Sherlod

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Dec 30, 2016
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Thanks everyone for the input. I didn't know that P irminia being so secretive. I'm really looking for something or several somethings that are out and visible.
currently I own Lp, a.geniculata, c.versicolor, gbb, and n cromatis.

Psalmopoeus pulcher, man. Blonde heads Ladies while a bit inflated are always sexy :cigar:

P.S

I suggest to buy also an Asian centipede :angelic:
Sorry but I'm not up for centipedes :eek:
 

Venom1080

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what day and where is this one, if you dont mind?
i keep my Tappi the same as my Psalmos. they might as well be from the same genus, fast growth rates, great appetite, etc.
both my irminias are fantastic eaters and are out pretty regularly. id take them over cambrigei any day.
 

viper69

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There is an expo in mid April and am cosidering some new addititions. It's incredibly difficult to find even basic information. So I'm cosidering Psalmopoeus irminia, Psalmopoeus pulcher, Nhand tripepii,
Tapinauchenius gigas.
any thoughts or recommendations. ...Thanks
I own the 1st 2. With irminia, you are lucky if you see more than their toes. Females are gorgeous, males are ugly. This species is VERY photosensitive. Pulcher, diff story, they are out A LOT, in fact mine is always out. I'd go pulcher.
 

Andrea82

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I have two juvenile P.pulcher who are equally divided personality wise. Nr 1 is secretive and shy, nr2 is out a lot but easily defensive. They grow really fast so be prepared for that.
T.gigas is actually the most defensive of the Tapinauchenius genus, and like the rest, very fast. But with Tapinauchenius, you know they're going to run, as opposed to Psalmopoeus, who like to lure you with slow moves only to bolt on you :D
Both these genera are quite a step up from GBB and Avicularia species so be prepared for that.
 

cold blood

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Step up as in speed and defensive or difficulty in care ?
Speed and potential for defensiveness..Psalms are easy to keep from a care perspective...they like a little moisture, but are also very drought resistant...as long as you don't soak them, you'll probably be fine.
 

Paramite

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Both of the psalmopoeus sp are NW arboreals. They require a little bit more humiduty, they're fast and are more likely to throw up a threat display but IMO as long as you've owned few arboreals for a while and are comfortable with them then I'd recommend thesw guys.
P. cambridgei was my first tarantula. They aren't so bad, as long as you know what to expect.
 

Chris LXXIX

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Psalmopoeus cambridgei, actually, are IMO the best arboreals for start. Hands down.

Those that think I'm wrong should realize that:

1) doesn't exist a 'slow' arboreal Theraphosidae because every arboreal T's are fast.
2) the venom, you say? Don't get tagged, period. It's not hard, uh.

Easy to care, hardy, a nice size (0.1) and IMO not even defensive at all... definitely not the way sometimes those were/are viewed.

See if 'avics' are so "goofy keepers" friendly like a P.cambridgei ;-)
 

Andrea82

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Step up as in speed and defensive or difficulty in care ?
Sorry, didn't get an alert for your response.
I meant for speed and defensiveness potential. Care is easy with Tappies an Psalmopoeus. Just throw food in, keep your fingers out, and make sure the spider is IN the enclosure when you're putting back the lid. :D
If you decide to go for Tapinauchenius, I'd choose another species of that genus to start with. My T.violaceus isn't defensive, save for rehousings and one time when i accidently dropped a roach on her. T.gigas is the most defensive of this genus, from what I've heard.
P.cambridgei is another good option for all reasons stated by others above :).
 

Spidermolt

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Psalmopoeus cambridgei, actually, are IMO the best arboreals for start. Hands down.

Those that think I'm wrong should realize that:

1) doesn't exist a 'slow' arboreal Theraphosidae because every arboreal T's are fast.
2) the venom, you say? Don't get tagged, period. It's not hard, uh.

Easy to care, hardy, a nice size (0.1) and IMO not even defensive at all... definitely not the way sometimes those were/are viewed.

See if 'avics' are so "goofy keepers" friendly like a P.cambridgei ;-)
yeah I love these guys and have nothing bad to say about them. My one girl does throw up threat poses when you have to occasionally bug her for a rehouse but then again I don't blame her. ;)

As for speed its just like what Chris said "all arboreal Ts are fast" but... A LOT of terrestrials are too so that's just one thing that every T keeper has to learn to deal with which doesn't take long at all to get use to.

Even though they need a little more humidity they are much hardier than Avics IMO which is nice especially if you want to buy a sling

Lastly as you can see in my profile picture P. cambridgei are a pretty good display T. in fact I always use tube bark in all their cages which at the end of the day is pretty useless because it seems like they just like to chill out in the open instead of hiding in the dark.
 
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