Substrate help

Abel

Arachnosquire
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Oct 1, 2016
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So I am thinking of changing my millipedes substrate from potting soil to a coco fibre based substrate, but my parents don't rlly allow me to buy some as its a bit too expensive. I am thinking of like finding a fallen coconut and kind of break it up and get the fibre from it that way. Anyone has experience with this? and if so... is there a particular way to do it? thks
 

The Snark

Dumpster Fire of the Gods
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Do they mash up the trunks of the palms too? I've seen them lay palm trunks out and drive a crawler over them to mash them into the mud to make temporary roadways. Those trunks are tough. Resilient too. Can last for years.
 

Abel

Arachnosquire
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Oct 1, 2016
Messages
54
Do they mash up the trunks of the palms too? I've seen them lay palm trunks out and drive a crawler over them to mash them into the mud to make temporary roadways. Those trunks are tough. Resilient too. Can last for years.
I don't know abt the trunks but my plan is:
Find an old coconut that has dropped
Get as much fibre from it as possible
Freeze the fibre overnight
Good to use?
 

The Snark

Dumpster Fire of the Gods
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Assuming you mean the coconut husk. Sounds like a good plan. Deep freeze, 0F, would be best to assure spores and critter/parasite/pest eggs take a thorough beating.
Also assuming you not minding the loss of a finger or two, shaving off the outer skin with a cleaver or machete yields fluffier fiber. (Watched an elderly woman with a vicious machete dehusk coconuts the other day to the tune of one a minute.
To fluff up the fiber the backwoods practice is to take a 1 inch thick metal bar or pipe a couple of feet long, smooth outside, place fiber on stump or log round and bang away at it. If the fiber is slightly moist it won't break up and powder as much.
 

Abel

Arachnosquire
Joined
Oct 1, 2016
Messages
54
Assuming you mean the coconut husk. Sounds like a good plan. Deep freeze, 0F, would be best to assure spores and critter/parasite/pest eggs take a thorough beating.
Also assuming you not minding the loss of a finger or two, shaving off the outer skin with a cleaver or machete yields fluffier fiber. (Watched an elderly woman with a vicious machete dehusk coconuts the other day to the tune of one a minute.
To fluff up the fiber the backwoods practice is to take a 1 inch thick metal bar or pipe a couple of feet long, smooth outside, place fiber on stump or log round and bang away at it. If the fiber is slightly moist it won't break up and powder as much.
so basically, dry it then smash it? No cleaver or machete haha
 

The Snark

Dumpster Fire of the Gods
Old Timer
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so basically, dry it then smash it? No cleaver or machete haha
Almost dry. Remove from the nut first unless you want nasty little sharp shards in the works.

Last I checked Coco Nucifera is in the Arecaceae family.
 

Abel

Arachnosquire
Joined
Oct 1, 2016
Messages
54
Almost dry. Remove from the nut first unless you want nasty little sharp shards in the works.

Last I checked Coco Nucifera is in the Arecaceae family.
whoops my bad bout the plant
 
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