Stunted Growth in New World Ts?

LiteraryRecluse

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 18, 2017
Messages
16
Hello,

I suspect that the growth of some of my Ts, specifically my New World Ts, is somehow being stunted.

A thread on AB I was reading seemed to rule out enclosure size. Considering how Ts are often kept in deli cups I didn't seriously think that was the issue. Besides, I am very generous with space, I think!

For a long time I attributed it to genetics, as some on AB also have; however, if that's true, I think I have several dwarf New World Ts!

What's really strange is how it seems to only be a problem with New World Ts of mine: Acanthoscurria, Megaphobema, Nhandu, Phormictopus, etc., except some Lasiodora and Theraphosa, which seem to be the anomaly. I've never had this issue with Old World Ts, such as Haplopelma, Poecilotheria, Hysterocrates, Lampropelma, etc. The latter all grow what I would think is a healthy rate.

My New World Ts look healthy enough, and some have lived 10-15 years, despite their small size. What seems to happen is they reach a certain size, stop eating or don't eat as much, and their growth flatlines, though they seem otherwise fine.

Thoughts?? Are they just growing really slow or is there something happening? It seems very bizarre…
 

sasker

Arachnoangel
Joined
Oct 9, 2016
Messages
794
So, if I get this right, some of your Ts have reached sexual maturity, but they do not get as big as can be expected after that? You mentioned you have some species up to 15 years, but still they have not reached their full adult size yet. Can you give us an example of a relatively old NW tarantula that remained small? This sounds very intriguing!
 

Jason B

Arachnosquire
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Sep 10, 2016
Messages
88
That seems very strange, especially considering some of those species have pretty decent growth rates. But I feel like more info is needed to really put forth any real theories. Like a picture of the view of the individuals that are small, along with what size enclosure you normally used during their growth. I mean yeah deli cups are fine for slings/juvies. But those gotta be some deli cups if your housing Lasiodora and Theraphosa in them. I figure you eventually move them out, i just kinda looking for a rough baseline of spider to enclosure size.
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
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Please provide species and the sizes they maxed out at....and how long you have had them. Growth does slow considerably for adults and reaching max size can take a lot of time, even for species that grow exceptionally fast when smaller, like chromatus.

Also keep in mind that sizes are often greatly exaggerrated and unrealistic....like those 10" LPs people try to convince buyers of.
 

boina

Lady of the mites
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Well, I'm not the OP, but I've a B. verdezi female that is definitely mature at 3.5" which I think is a bit small. I got it at 3" and thought it was just a juvi, but turns out it might even have been adult since it took more than 2 years with me to molt for the first time. So if someone has a theory for this I'm all ears.
 

Jason B

Arachnosquire
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Sep 10, 2016
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Well I feel like with most species there is a pretty big range..most as what is mentioned as sizes are often what I consider best case scenarios.

It would be similar to saying humans can grow to be 8 foot tall. That statement is both completely true and also describes one very rare outcome. Because I've seen plenty of adult humans that weren't even 5 foot.

If a species can grow to 5-6 it most likely also mature at 3-4. Its also likely that the smaller specimens might not be as common in the wild as they are in the hobby. Due to low survival rates.

One specimen like this is kinda expected here and there.. But the ops situation seems to suggest its multiple specimens. Which means it could be environmental
 

LiteraryRecluse

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 18, 2017
Messages
16
…And here are some example enclosures I use. On the left is a C. crawshayi and the right is my A. geniculata above. I have seen changed some of the decor, adding instead of the hollowed out fish-tank decor, a cork bark hide.

 

CEC

Arachnoangel
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Don't forget lots of hobbyists like to exaggerate on their specimen's size.

As Cold Blood said, we need more info to assess this question properly.
 

Tanner Dzula

Arachnoknight
Joined
Feb 29, 2016
Messages
190
A. geniculata that I have had for 13-15 years. Around 4-4.5 inches in size, much smaller than I would expect from this species. She looks healthy and fine, just is small

that is somewhat small for a A. Geniculata. not unheard of but pretty small. its hard to tell in the picture with nothing to reference other then substrate, but if its truly 4" its barely longer then one of my Males legs.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
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Dec 8, 2006
Messages
11,532
It's impossible to provide you an answer without knowing the following:

1. Temperature logs
2. Frequency of feeding (specific, not some vague decade old memory)
3. Type of food fed, and how often that type was fed
 

Jason B

Arachnosquire
Joined
Sep 10, 2016
Messages
88
Yeah I'd like to see a few more examples as well. What I said earlier can still apply here, think of it this way, you could very well have the 'runt' of that particular sack. And you say this runt is 4-4.5 inches. I don't think its to much of a stretch to say someone could show that same picture and be like this 6 inch a. genic. There is nothing in the picture to show scale so its not easy to dispute that it isn't a 6 inch T. Now, to be clear I'm not saying your spider isn't 4 inches just showing how easily someone else with a similar sized T might exagerate its size. Not many people are gonna brag about their smaller then average T, kinda a size matters thing. Like say Sp Pumpkin Patch most dealers and alot of reports say the large version grows to 4 inches in size. But I've also heard from some more informed people that the is not true, on average they only grow about an inch bigger and are closer to 3 inches. I think its possible if someone maintained are large collection of both species they might find themselves with a Small that is Bigger then a particular large.

A few more questions, your adult enclosures look find, I don't need a picture but whats a normal enclosure for a 1/4 sling or so. How spacious do you normal house the tiny guys.
And since this is going to come up at some point, are all of the smaller Ts possibly from the same seller.
 

darkness975

dream reaper
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…And here are some example enclosures I use. On the left is a C. crawshayi and the right is my A. geniculata above. I have seen changed some of the decor, adding instead of the hollowed out fish-tank decor, a cork bark hide.

I cannot speak for the size factor, but what I can tell you is that Exo Terra Enclosures are not suitable for terrestrial species, especially one that is bulky like A. geniculata.
 

LiteraryRecluse

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 18, 2017
Messages
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Feeding: I feed them at least twice a week with crickets that I have tried to fatten. The above P. cancerides hasn't eaten for quite some time, my L. parahybana just finished a several month fast and is now ravenous, my P. nigricolor seems to be starting a fast, etc.

Temperature: The room is always kept at 71˚F/22˚C.
 
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