Stuff On Tarantula's Abdomen Help Plz

Bjorgly

Arachnodemon
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Aug 7, 2002
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Hi everyone, there is a patch that hasn't spread in a while but hasnt gone away in a while on my t's abdomen that has begun to worry me. Although it seems benign because it does not effect my t's eating or health and it is still plump and active. It is about a 1/2 inch square patch of light grey lint looking sort of fuzz. Im pretty sure it isnt mold as the humidity is 40% and rarely any more. Sometimes there is some of this light grey 'lint' sitting ontop of the hairs and other lint and looks like i can pick it right off and that usually goes away the next day. But some of it looks like it is attached right onto my T and is growing out of her but i may be wrong. The spider is a adult female 4 inch mexican redknee spider. Any ideas of what this might be? I took some pics of it and i will post them tomorrow for a better idea.

Thanks alot!

Mark
 

Vayu Son

Avatar of Anansi
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.

Nothing bad. Bald spots on the abdomen are usually either an indication of pre-molt(which they can be in for a period of months) or a loss of their utricating hairs. The hairs on the abdomen of most New world species such as the mexican redknee act as a self defense mechanism which they can kick at predators/prey. Just make sure if she kicks at you or if you touch her to wash your hands, as the hairs can caus permanent eye damage if you rub them in. Ive had slings and adult t's have bald spots even when they lack utricating hairs, and most will agree it is nothing to worry about.

hmm, after reading your post a second time.... Try cleaning/drying the substrate out completely, removing any sponges-in-water-dish if you have any, and any cricket remains. After the substrate drys or is replaced put the T back in and make sure to keep her in a clean environment. Im assuming shes captive bred...but perchance you stumbled upon a wildcought B.smithi then it could be some form of parasitic infestation. And those are really unidentifiable in T's.


Best wishes to you and the spidy.
 
Last edited:

MrDeranged

He Who Rules
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Jul 16, 2002
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The "lint" is nothing to worry about. It's hairs that were kicked that didn't quite make it off of the abdomen. They sometimes clump up like that together and it looks kinda like your T has dandruff. My smithi's are notorious for having this as well. Actually, a lot of my larger Brachypelma ssp. have this. Never caused any problems.

Scott
 

Wade

Arachnoking
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Aug 16, 2002
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If you think it really is a fungus, it can be treated with a 10% betadine solution (available over the counter at most drug stores). Use a Q-tip and dab it on the infected area every couple of days and it should go away.

However, I think Scott is right, considering the low humidity. Probably nothing to worry about.

Wade
 

belewfripp

Arachnobaron
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Aug 17, 2002
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Yeah, it is what Scott said, most likely. I've got a Nhandu carapoensis who came to me with mud plastered all over her. After she molted I discovered she'd suffered a puncture wound sometime in the past right on her abdomen. The mud and/or scarring from the wound seemed to have affected her urticating hair as she almost always had big tufts of urticating lint a lot of the time she couldn't manage to get the hair airborne (though she does like to try).

Adrian
 

Bjorgly

Arachnodemon
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Aug 7, 2002
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729
Thanks guys, definately helped put my mind at ease. It is not a bald spot, it is definately the lint stuff you guys described. I really didnt think it was bad but I just like the peace of mind.

Thanks,

Mark
 
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