Stromatopelma calceatum

Mez

Arachnoknight
Joined
Nov 17, 2010
Messages
215
Probably going to get a big adult of these next week.
Ive read about the venom, i dont plan on getting bitten.
Just a few questions really for those that keep them.
Do you provide a hollow? Do they use it? Also, how much does this species web?
Only arboreals i have atm are a. versicolor and an OBT, and a p. irminia if that gets classed as arboreal, ive read about the speed of these, i have an E. cyanognathus that is rather quick, how will speed compare?
Im not sure if i want to provide a hollow or tall slab of cork bark yet. Pictures of setups would be nice!
Cheers
Mez
 
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jbm150

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 18, 2009
Messages
1,651
Probably going to get a big adult of these next week.
Ive read about the venom, i dont plan on getting bitten.
Just a few questions really for those that keep them.
Do you provide a hollow? Do they use it? Also, how much does this species web?
Only arboreals i have atm are a. versicolor and an OBT, and a p. irminia if that gets classed as arboreal, ive read about the speed of these, i have an E. cyanognathus that is rather quick, how will speed compare?
Im not sure if i want to provide a hollow or tall slab of cork bark yet. Pictures of setups would be nice!
Cheers
Mez

Consensus is that this is THE most venomous tarantula, definitely don't get bit. They also seem to be more bitey than H. macs with many individuals being downright jerks. Just something to keep in mind.

I've never kept 'em but from what I've read and from keeping an H. mac, an upright bark or hollow will serve 'em well. They're pretty webby and will make a web tube of their own if they don't have something to build it against. My H. mac had a couple of different, non-connected burrows it would alternate using.

Between my regalis, cambridgei, irminia, and H. mac, the H. mac had a leg up on all of 'em. She was really freakin' fast. S. cals are right there too and, depending on the individual of course, your s. cal might use its speed to run AT you rather than away. Best of luck, they're a great species :D
 

Sleazoid

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jul 18, 2010
Messages
241
I had a 2" specimen, while I didn't find it as fast as my E. cyanognathus it was still pretty fast, I left my specimen alone and it never gave me a threat posture other than the first day I got it, seemed to be pretty well tempered, but once again this was a small specimen. The same specimen also got loose in a rehouse and I never found it again. So, yes they are fast.
 

Jacobchinarian

Arachnoknight
Joined
Aug 2, 2010
Messages
255
Probably going to get a big adult of these next week.
Ive read about the venom, i dont plan on getting bitten.
The guy from 127 hours didn't plan on cutting off his arm. ;)
 

JamieC

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 1, 2010
Messages
37
I bought 4 tiny spiderlings about 4 weeks ago.

They are lightening fast! Getting them out of the film pots and into their enclosures was not easy!

I provided enough substrate for them to burrow and a vertical cork bark hide. 3 of them burrowed and the other 1 lives in a hole at the top of the cork bark.

They are a stunning species. My favourite in my small collection.

Jamie :)
 

dianedfisher

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 14, 2007
Messages
331
There are plenty of threads regarding this species if you want to read more. I advise you to do so before purchasing an adult. THIS T WILLLL COME AFTER YOU. Heteroscodra maculata will usually (but not always) run in the opposite direction, Stromatopelma calceatum often run to the top and they are very quick. I can't vouch for the potency of the venom and I hope I never have to. I doubt there are too many tarantula owners who INTEND to get tagged, but research says this is not the one to test your luck with. I love all of my T's and I own five of these, but I treat them with extra caution during their care and feeding. Mine are all set up as arboreals with several inches of substrate and a cork curl. They tend to burrow at ground level as per Psalmopoeus. Good luck. I look forward to seeing some photos. Diane
 

Mez

Arachnoknight
Joined
Nov 17, 2010
Messages
215
Thanks guys.
Dianne, i think what i will do is provide a slightly larger than needed enclosure with a really good hide, always using tweezers to drop food in and remove bolus/waterbowls etc. Hopefully this will minimise the likelyness of a bite.
Cheers
James
 

Mez

Arachnoknight
Joined
Nov 17, 2010
Messages
215
Got it today, not as big as I hoped but still a beauty.
Before I transferd it...


Will get more pics later.
Cheers
James
 

jbm150

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 18, 2009
Messages
1,651
Maybe its me but that looks more like an H. mac....
 

Mez

Arachnoknight
Joined
Nov 17, 2010
Messages
215
Where do H. macs originate from? Ad this was wild caught in Tanzania.
 

rustym3talh3ad

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 22, 2008
Messages
885
There baboons so probably Africa.
Togo...as in the Togo Star Burst Baboon Tarantula.

And how can we say this is 100% H. mac, they look almost identical...please explain guys.

scratch that, i agree, looked a bit closer at the abdomen and the back 4 legs...that looks convincingly like a heteroscodra maculata....
 
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rustym3talh3ad

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 22, 2008
Messages
885
Where do H. macs originate from? Ad this was wild caught in Tanzania.
most likely not...Tanzania is way outside of their natural range, if im not mistaken S. calceatum is from the same area of western africa as H. mac...not togo persay but the general area. so Tanzania begin way into central africa (almost considered eastern africa) i would have to say you were lied to.
 

Mez

Arachnoknight
Joined
Nov 17, 2010
Messages
215
I doubt I was lied too, the guy has no need to lie, he knows hardly anything about Ts, and mainly imports direct and deals mainly in venomous, he told me the 'feather leg baboon' came from Tanzania with 50 others, its taken him over two years to sell them!
Whether its heterascoda or stromatopelma, it came from a Tanzanian exporter with a load of other wild caught stuff. They could of course have got them from another part of Africa.
Should i be keeping this T humid? As if it is H. mac i just read they preffer a humid environment?
Cheers,
James
 
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x Mr Awesome x

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 15, 2009
Messages
449
Here's some pics of my Stromatopelm calceatum and Heteroscodra maculata for comparison. Do you have any more pics that you could upload? From what I can see of the abdomen the pattern does more closely resemble a young Heteroscodra maculata. The Stromatopelm calceatum abdomen does not have the extreme detail of the maculata but has a very distinctive center stripe. Also, S cal have light striping than runs length wise with their from legs.

Stromatopelma calceatum




Heteroscodra maculata


 

rustym3talh3ad

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 22, 2008
Messages
885
Here's some pics of my Stromatopelm calceatum and Heteroscodra maculata for comparison. Do you have any more pics that you could upload? From what I can see of the abdomen the pattern does more closely resemble a young Heteroscodra maculata. The Stromatopelm calceatum abdomen does not have the extreme detail of the maculata but has a very distinctive center stripe. Also, S cal have light striping than runs length wise with their from legs.

Stromatopelma calceatum




Heteroscodra maculata


also something to point out, even tho S. calceatum is the "Feather Leg Baboon" the H. mac has the very thick bone like number 4's...and the abdomen has the blotch pattern (hence the name maculata, latin for Blemished)...so i would have to say that you most likely have an H. mac, not to be saddened by this becuz they are both A: beautiful and B: very closely related to S. calceatum in attitude and potency.
 
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