Strange G. pulchripes behavior?

HAGAR

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 2, 2010
Messages
58
hi there

I was wondering if this has ever happened to anyone on the forum and why would a t do this.

I have a 3 1/2 inch G. pulchripes. Last night i gave her a cricket, she took it without fail. she sat there for about 5 min then dropped the cricket turned around and started to web the cricket. took her about another 5 min, she then stopped turned around and started feeding again.

can anyone tel me why she would do that?
 

webbedone

Arachnobaron
Joined
Aug 27, 2010
Messages
410
Sometimes T's web their food to eat later, maybe it wasnt sure if it wanted it.
 

HAGAR

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 2, 2010
Messages
58
I thought that might be the case but directly after the webbing she started eating the cricket again.

Thought that is was a bit strange .
 

Ingar

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 13, 2010
Messages
46
I thought that might be the case but directly after the webbing she started eating the cricket again.

Thought that is was a bit strange .
There is nothing strange at all! It's a natural instinct which indicates 2 main reasons of that behaviour. When T feeding for awhile - food strarting to disintegrate and web helps it to stick together. The second reason is to locate a food source - because spiders generally are blind, so web structure is ussual pattern to envroment and location of other (and food) objects.
Maybe your T was overfed and it didnt want to feed like starved wolf, or temperature is too low in enclosure - so it can't locomote in normal speed.
 

HAGAR

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 2, 2010
Messages
58
there is nothing strange at all! It's a natural instinct which indicates 2 main reasons of that behaviour. When t feeding for awhile - food strarting to disintegrate and web helps it to stick together. The second reason is to locate a food source - because spiders generally are blind, so web structure is ussual pattern to envroment and location of other (and food) objects.
Maybe your t was overfed and it didnt want to feed like starved wolf, or temperature is too low in enclosure - so it can't locomote in normal speed.
well its not really cold in there the temp is kept at a constant 78 degrees and she only molted 2 weeks ago so i doubt that she is over fed. But thanks for the suggestions.:)

i guess that its just one of those thing they sometimes do to make us underestimate out setups or feeding regiments lol.
 

Zoltan

Cult Leader
Old Timer
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May 20, 2008
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1,467
Normal behaviour.

spiders generally are blind
Sure, there are blind spiders (there's even at least one species of tarantula that is blind), but poor vision does not equal blind. And... ever heard of jumping spiders (Salticidae)? ;)
 

Ingar

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 13, 2010
Messages
46
Normal behaviour.


Sure, there are blind spiders (there's even at least one species of tarantula that is blind), but poor vision does not equal blind. And... ever heard of jumping spiders (Salticidae)? ;)
Dhaa...
Zoltan, I know that's all you ment. I'm near at phd in invert sciences now - don't underestimate me..
About that vision - I was generalising. True meaning of "vision" still not clarified in sciences.
By the way I love those Salticids - interesting fellows :)
 

REAPER591

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 18, 2010
Messages
32
Unless the prey item is super small in comparison to the tarantula, 99% of my collection will exhibit this behavior.

The basic principle behind it would probably be the fact that tarantula venom liquefies the internals of the feeder insect, so instinctively they make their own "mug" to drink their cricket milkshake from :D
 

HAGAR

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 2, 2010
Messages
58
THANKS FOR THE INFO.

I JUST THOUGHT IT WAS STRANGE AS THIS WAS THE FIRST TIME THAT IT HAPPENED.

BUT IT AL MAKES SENSE NOW.:wall:
 

Scorpionking20

Arachnoknight
Joined
May 31, 2010
Messages
158
I could be wrong, but I'd be willing to bet they do it to keep the prey together while they are eating. I've seen some sloppy roaches that would have fallen apart without the webbings aid.
 

rbailey1010

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 11, 2010
Messages
27
My G. rosea and my G. pulchripes both do that....might be a Grammostola characteristic, who knows!

Its nothing unusual or out of character for them, thats for sure

If they are not eating, then I'd be worried
 

Sadistic Haplo

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 16, 2009
Messages
145
My G. rosea and my G. pulchripes both do that....might be a Grammostola characteristic, who knows!

Its nothing unusual or out of character for them, thats for sure

If they are not eating, then I'd be worried
My B.vagans and one of my P.irminia's does this.
 

AprilH

Petridish
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 2, 2005
Messages
85
Maybe it's also to protect themselves... A bound up roach or cricket won't be able to struggle or kick or bite.
 
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