state legalities on catching/owning/selling invertebrates

petshopguy

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 13, 2007
Messages
142
I would like to start a thread on the individual state legalities on which species of inverts can be caught/owned/sold. For most of us, this is a hobby that we can make some extra $ at. We don't want to find ourselves in a courtroom or facing a large fine as a result of a simple mistake of not knowing state regulations well enough.

For the title of each post - use the state that you are offering information on.

Hope this starts a useful and valuable thread.

Please include government documents when available so we can download and retain a copy ourselves.
 
Last edited:

petshopguy

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 13, 2007
Messages
142
Michigan

The only information I currently have to offer is a list of species that are protected in Michigan. It can be found at this website.

http://web4.msue.msu.edu/mnfi/data/animal_list.pdf

Any invertebrates not on the protected list can be caught/owned/sold, per the Department of Natural Resources. Only certain species of amphibians and reptiles can be sold, with a license and restrictions.

The only information I have for importing invertebrates is that most regulations/restrictions are handled at the city level of government.

Hope this helps.
 

petshopguy

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 13, 2007
Messages
142
Florida

I have heard that species of any non-native cockroaches are illegal to own/import. Not 100% sure, but it came from a reliable source.
 

cacoseraph

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 5, 2005
Messages
8,328
I have heard that species of any non-native cockroaches are illegal to own/import. Not 100% sure, but it came from a reliable source.
i've definitely heard that too

would that be something to look at under APHIS?
 

Louise E. Rothstein

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 10, 2005
Messages
430
How about in Ohio? Are native invertebrates legal? And how about the numerous NATURALIZED invertebrates that are frequently mistaken for "natives," but which actually originated in other countries? Which of these native and naturalized invertebrates ARE legal...and which are not...?
 

MizM

Arachnoprincess
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 13, 2003
Messages
4,918
California

http://ipl.unm.edu/cwl/statbook/califo.html

My local pet store works closely with the Cal Dept of Fish & Game, keeps illegal creatures seized during drugs raids, etc. until they can be relocated. They state that there is no law prohibiting the capture and sale of local inverts. (Second hand info... take it with a grain of salt.) People bring him wild caught Ts and scorps often, he gives them to me because there really isn't a market for them here.
 

petshopguy

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 13, 2007
Messages
142
California

If I did the attachment procedure right there is an attachment to invertebrates that can be imported and sold within California without the need of a permit/license. This was sent to me via an arachnoboards member. I erased the pm from him, otherwise I would give proper credit for his sending it to me.

It appears to be a very useful document.:cool:
 

arachnocat

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 27, 2005
Messages
792
California

That was from me, but I actually got the link from mantidforum.com. :)
Here's a link to the Pest Exclusion Branch of the CDFA website. You can download the whole manual from here and see what other animals/plants you can or can't ship into CA. http://www.cdfa.ca.gov/phpps/pe/pqm.htm
 

petshopguy

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 13, 2007
Messages
142
Florida

Thanks Arachnocat for the info. This was posted on the scorpion links by pitbulllady -

The state of Florida requires a "Dangerous Arthropods permit" to keep any scorpion of any genera other than Pandinus, Heterometrus, and Hadogenes, and Hadrurus, and this includes all of Florida's native Centroides species. This same permit is required to keep any medically-significant true spiders, such as Latrodactus, but no tarantula species require a permit. It doesn't make a lot of sense, though, because many of the scorpions that require a permit are just as harmless as the ones that don't, like Euscorpius, for example.

pitbulllady
 

petshopguy

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 13, 2007
Messages
142
Nyc

This is a post from MindUtopia in the tarantula links -

Here is the text of the code stating the bans on exotics in NYC:

NEW YORK CITY HEALTH CODE

§ 161.01. Wild animals prohibited. [FN1]

(a) No person shall sell or give to another person, possess, harbor or keep wild animals identified in subsection (b) of this section or in regulations promulgated by the Commissioner pursuant to subsection (e) of this section other than in:

(1) A zoological park or aquarium operated by the Department of Parks, by the Wildlife Conservation Society, or by the Staten Island Zoological Society; or

(2) A laboratory operated pursuant to § 504 of the Public Health Law; or

(3) A circus or native wildlife rehabilitator licensed by federal or state agencies; or

(4) A place which has received the approval of the Department to exhibit or use such animals, and which has protective devices which are adequate to prevent such animal from escaping or injuring the public. The Department may impose reasonable conditions and time limits on the granting of such approval.

(b) For the purposes of this Code, wild animals are deemed to be any animals which are naturally inclined to do harm and capable of inflicting harm upon human beings and are hereby prohibited pursuant to subsection (a). Such animals shall include: (i) any animals specified by the Commissioner in regulations promulgated pursuant to this section; (ii) any native or exotic wildlife whose possession or sale is prohibited because they are designated as protected or endangered pursuant to any federal, state or local law, regulation, or rule; and (iii) any of the following animals:

(1) All dogs other than domesticated dogs (Canis familiaris), including, but not limited to, wolf, fox, coyote, hyaena, dingo, jackal, dhole, fennec, raccoon dog, zorro, bush dog, aardwolf, cape hunting dog and any hybrid offspring of a wild dog and domesticated dog.

(2) All cats other than domesticated cats (Felis catus), including, but not limited to, lion, tiger, leopard, ocelot, jaguar, puma, panther, mountain lion, cheetah, wild cat, cougar, bobcat, lynx, serval, caracal, jaguarundi, margay and any hybrid offspring of a wild cat and domesticated cat.

(3) All bears, including polar, grizzly, brown and black bear.

(4) All fur bearing mammals of the family Mustelidae, including, but not limited to, weasel, marten, mink, badger, ermine, skunk, otter, pole cat, zorille, wolverine, stoat and ferret.

(5) All Procyonidae: All raccoon (eastern, desert, ring-tailed cat), kinkajou, cacomistle, cat-bear, panda and coatimundi.

(6) All carnivorous mammals of the family Viverridae, including, but not limited to, civet, mongoose, genet, binturong, fossa, linsang and suri- cate.

(7) All bats (Chiroptera).

(8) All non-human primates, including, but not limited to, monkey, ape, chimpanzee, gorilla and lemur.

(9) All squirrels (Sciuridae).

(10) Reptiles (Reptilia). All Helodermatidae (gila monster and Mexican beaded lizard); all front-fanged venomous snakes, even if devenomized, including, but not limited to, all Viperidae (viper, pit viper), all Elapidae (cobra, mamba, krait, coral snake), all Atractaspididae (African burrowing asp), all Hydrophiidae (sea snake), all Laticaudidae (sea krait); all venomous, mid-or rear-fanged, Duvernoy-glanded members of the family Colubridae, even if devenomized; any member, or hybrid offspring of the family Boidae, including, but not limited to, the common or green anaconda and yellow anaconda; any member of the family Pythonidae, including but not limited to the African rock python, Indian or Burmese python, Amethystine or scrub python; any member of the family Varanidae, including the white throated monitor, Bosc's or African savannah monitor, Komodo monitor or dragon, Nile monitor, crocodile monitor, water monitor, Bornean earless monitor; any member of the family Iguanidae, including the green or common iguana; any member of the family teiidae, including, but not limited to the golden, common, or black and white tegu; all members of the family Chelydridae, including snapping turtle and alligator snapping turtle; and all members of the order Crocodylia, including, but not limited to alligator, caiman and crocodile.

(11) Birds and Fowl (Aves): All predatory or large birds, including, but not limited to, eagle, hawk, falcon, owl, vulture, condor, emu, rhea and ostrich; roosters, geese, ducks and turkeys prohibited or otherwise regulated pursuant to § 161.19 of this Code, the Agriculture and Markets Law or applicable federal law.

(12) All venomous insects, including, but not limited to, bee, hornet and wasp.

(13) Arachnida and Chilopoda: All venomous spiders, including, but not limited to, tarantula, black widow and solifugid; scorpion; all venomous arthropods including, but not limited to, centipede.

(14) All large rodents (Rodentia), including, but not limited to, gopher, muskrat, paca, woodchuck, marmot, beaver, prairie dog, capybara, sewellel, viscacha, porcupine and hutia.

(15) All even-toed ungulates (Artiodactyla) including, but not limited to, deer, antelope, sheep, giraffe and hippopotamus.

(16) All odd-toed ungulates (Perissodactyla) other than domesticated horses (Equus caballus), including, but not limited to, zebra, rhinoceros and tapir.

(17) All marsupials, including, but not limited to, Tasmanian devil, dasyure, bandicoot, kangaroo, wallaby, opossum, wombat, koala bear, cuscus, numbat and pigmy, sugar and greater glider.

And here's the link to the whole page:

http://canines.com/rescue/animallaw.shtml
 

cacoseraph

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 5, 2005
Messages
8,328
This is a post from MindUtopia in the tarantula links -
hey PSG

i would limit cites to actual governmental agencies... i think that will save you TONS of problems later on. the g sites will cover their ass with the laws being updated... the non-g sites will not necesarily be as studious about it. edu's.... *might* work, but again, they are not culpable for having the wrong info... but i suspect g sites *might* be
 

petshopguy

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Jun 13, 2007
Messages
142
That's an excellent point caco - always have to consider the source of information. I am just concerned that putting a stricter guideline like that on this thread - we may not have many submissions and this thread will just fade away like the sunset without offering some valuable info. But, I agree - always double-check the info if it isn't from a .gov source. Don't take it as gospel.
 

Arachnomaniak

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 8, 2004
Messages
932
To my knowledge, in Canada any non native invert that eats vegitation is regulated by Agriculture Canada... I believe mantids are also regulated. Certain cities have some blanket bylaws such as "no scorpions" etc which can be a bit ridiculous.
 

Snakefox

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 14, 2006
Messages
56
for texans
visti texas parks and wildlife's web site they will gladly tell you what you can and can't do. Nice people :)
 

ScienceDvia

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 3, 2007
Messages
30
Washington??

I would love some information here. Short of calling the state entimologyst, I can find nothing specific online. I've looked for hours. I'm concerned with phasmids.

I recently joined the stickinsect group at yahoo and there was a posting by a woman in my state who purchased some eggs from the UK or Europe..I forget which...anyway, her shipment was opened by the USDA (dep. of Agriculture) last year. Last month they showed up at her door and confiscated ALL of her phasmids. She was devastated.

I own two types....and I'm a teacher. I have no trouble not owning them if they are illegal, or surrenduring them to the USDA, but I'd like to have easy access info that tells me these critters are illegal. All I've received so far is here-say from people. Assuming the above woman is telling the truth, and I have no reason not to believe her, I keep asking, "where is the big NO?" Is it just a blanket law covering all vegetation eating insects?

Thanks for letting me VENT!

ScienceDiva
 

dtknow

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 18, 2004
Messages
2,241
Everyone make sure to hide your venemous solifugids!
 

RoachGirlRen

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 8, 2007
Messages
994
NY is more lax than NYC; you can own most of the animals listed as banned in NYC in the state. However, since this topic was also about catching invertebrates, I should note that as of the last time I checked, only threatened and endangered terrestrial inverts were prohibited for wild capture without appropriate licensure. However, there were some very staunch guidelines about the removal of aquatic invertebrates, especially filter feeders like freshwater mussells. Hence, the only aquatic inverts (primarily snails) I've ever collected were feral/invasive species, which the DEC is generally quite happy to see fewer of. If I can find the full state laws, I'll post 'em.
 

jwmeeker

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 22, 2006
Messages
40
Florida

The following email was in response to obtaining roaches for Florida back in April 2006.

"We would have no objection to the use of Blaberus craniifer or Blaberus discoidalis, both of which are already found in Florida and both of which are available on the Internet. If you acquire your breeding stock from outside of Florida, you will need a permit but we would grant such a permit for those species provided the identifications are accurate."



----

M.C. Thomas, Ph.D.

Florida State Collection of Arthropods

Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services

P.O. Box 147100

Gainesville, FL 32614-7100 U.S.A.

Telephone: (352) 372-3505; e-mail: thomasm@doacs.state.fl.us
 
Top