Starting True Spiders!

Deolok

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 24, 2006
Messages
449
I had been considering it for awhile and because my few of my scorpions have died or traded I wanted to try keeping true spiders and see how things go. I was trying to think of some to start up with.

I was going to go with a few common spiders in my area, because I really dont know of to many rare ones around from where I live (in anyone knows please tell me).

And I would like to find myself a Huntsman, I am pretty sure they are indigious to Australlia, but I figure someone might have one on here.
 

Cheshire

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 7, 2005
Messages
3,160
I had been considering it for awhile and because my few of my scorpions have died or traded I wanted to try keeping true spiders and see how things go. I was trying to think of some to start up with.

I was going to go with a few common spiders in my area, because I really dont know of to many rare ones around from where I live (in anyone knows please tell me).

And I would like to find myself a Huntsman, I am pretty sure they are indigious to Australlia, but I figure someone might have one on here.

You're roughly the same area as I am. You should be able to find some nice sized dolomedes species in your area.

Huntsmen are basically anything in the sparssid family. There's more than a handful floating around. Ask one of the dealers, or someone from FLA to nab you a H. vanatoria.
 

Selenops

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 13, 2006
Messages
844
The Spider Pharm has great buys on live Hogna Carolinensis adults and juveniles, Dolomedes gertschi, Phidippus johnsoni adults, Phidippus octopunctatis adults, and other true spiders. Even Vaejovis spinigerus for $2.45 apiece. (Just ordered 10 of the latter.)

The Mouse Grey Jumping Spider is the largest of North American Salticids and often preys on inverts larger than itself.

Phidippus octopunctatis

ROOOOAAAR! CHOMP! (sorry, couldn't resist.)
 

dragontears

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 14, 2005
Messages
267
I just had an H. venatoria egg sac hatch out, so I have close to 200 of them running around at the moment. Let me know if you want any!
 

Venom

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 21, 2002
Messages
1,709
In getting into true spiders, the very best thing you can do is to go out and find some true spiders from your local area and see how you like the whole true spider thing. This way you will gain VERY VALUABLE experience in dealing with small to medium sized spiders. These are not tarantulas: they have different behaviours and different feeding and housing needs. You'll need to be able to get very small spiders to feed regularly ( not as easy as it sounds, for some species ), and be able to cope with something that might be only 1/2 - 1 inch long, but fast, active and nasty. Huntsman spiders are very quick, and very defensive. Combined with smaller size, this makes some true spiders challenging to deal with ( just try handling a Cheiracanthium or Herpyllus ecclesiasticus, and see what I mean!! well, maybe not the Cheiracanthium...for safety's sake) .

I recommend you collect some wolfspiders of Hogna, Rabidosa, Arctosa, as well as the Dolomedes family, and see how you get on with those before you take on a huntsman. If you can find some Arctosa, these would be excellent primers for the speed you'll be faced with from the huntsman, only in an easier-to-manage TERRESTRIAL spider.


There should be all sorts of interesting species in your area, and with true spids, much of the fun is with catching your own! I'm not saying don't get a huntsman...just try the local stuff before you buy exotics. Trust me, you'll be doing yourself a favor!
 

alkarlosse

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 29, 2007
Messages
17
I second that, Venom :)

True spiders are somewhat difficult of a pet, mostly due to their size (you have to find small prey). But getting a spider from your local area should make it easier, since you won't have to worry about temperature or humidity or such things. That is because they will still be living in the same area, thus same climate; only it will be captured.

Well, my first 'weird' pet was on of the Salticidae family. A wonderful creature, very beautiful and very easily found in the back yard. I never really found out its true species, but browsing the web it looks like it is a Carrhotus xanthogramma (especially in this pic).

The good thing about the Salticidae ("jumping spiders") is that they can take on prey larger than themselves, even flying prey. They are marvellous predators and of course, cute little things that stare at you with two large eyes when you peek into their container.

There was no trouble feeding it normal flies, even moths, but it never touched ants or termites or other crawling critters. I really don't know why. Overall, we lived together for almost a year. She even hibernated. And had spiderlings little before I discovered she was dead in her cocoon (sad story).

That is why I would recommend a "jumping spider" if you can get your hands on one. It's cute, easy to feed and you will learn a whole lot of stuff as I did.

PS.: Handling a Salticidae may result in loosing it. The jump very far. Really.
 

Selenops

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 13, 2006
Messages
844
Or a Wolf Spider, can't recommend these enough for a beginner, every bit as exciting and fascinating as a Jumping Spider.

They voraciously consume crickets and are not shy about it.

But both are wandering/opportunistic hunters.
 

Helio

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 21, 2007
Messages
40
I started with wolfies and i liked them a lot. Very voracious fellas.My oldest is 7 months aproxx with me and we shared a lot of good times together :p. They are very strong critters and eat almost anything smaller than them. They often feed on dead prey
 

ZergFront

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
May 2, 2009
Messages
1,959
Basically, I think the majority of the active hunting spiders make fascinating pets. I KNOW this is old... was doing a search for 'Carrhotus xanthogramma' and I always find talking about true spiders interesting. I must keep my reputation as the thread resurrector!!! ;P :D

Funnel weavers and wolf spiders are awesome, but VERY fast! My funnel weaver could outrun my P. irminia any day! Jumping spiders are cool but alkar has a point, it's not hard to loose one if they're handled. One of my P. johnsoni slings jumped and I couldn't see it for 15 minutes and thought it may have gotten crushed by a book at one point. Got it back, luckily.

Phidippus and Platycrptus are quite fun species. Both get pretty big (9mm or more).
 

eelnoob

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 22, 2006
Messages
334
The Spider Pharm has great buys on live Hogna Carolinensis adults and juveniles, Dolomedes gertschi, Phidippus johnsoni adults, Phidippus octopunctatis adults, and other true spiders. Even Vaejovis spinigerus for $2.45 apiece. (Just ordered 10 of the latter.)

The Mouse Grey Jumping Spider is the largest of North American Salticids and often preys on inverts larger than itself.

Phidippus octopunctatis

ROOOOAAAR! CHOMP! (sorry, couldn't resist.)


Thanks for the bump Zerg.


Looks like I'll be ordering myself a few of the Grey jumpers very soon.
 
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