Springtails in with spiderlings

UralOwl

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Apr 20, 2012
Messages
97
I've had springtails in several of my juvenile and adult tarantula's enclosures for nearly a year now; most of them live in the water dishes, though some also move around in the substrate in the enclosures that are kept more humid (such as my avics and LP). I've been told that they don't harm tarantulas, and they haven't done so yet so I've just let them be.

However, about a week ago, I noticed some springtails (the most I noticed was about 8 in one container) in about 4 of my tiny spiderling's containers. They don't seem to be causing any harm and the slings don't react to them, even when they're crawling around near their feet. However, I'm a bit concerned that the springtails may disturb the slings when they molt. Is this something to be worried about or should I just allow the springs and slings to co-exist?
 

catfishrod69

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Nothing at all to worry about. They wont harm them. Think of all the microorganisms that live amongst them in the wilds.
 

Meezerkoko

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Dec 18, 2012
Messages
156
I specifically add them to my sling containers and I know for a fact they all have way more than 8 springtails a piece in with them with no ill effects. Plus if there's a threat of mold (since its kept more moist for slings) the springs will take care of it. They also clean up the cricket parts the slings don't eat.

---------- Post added 04-01-2013 at 08:22 AM ----------

Speaking of who that reminds me I need to add some springtails to my two newest enclosures.
 

Storm76

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Jan 30, 2012
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I have them in nearly all of my enclosures (minus the arid species). *shrugs* Nothing to worry about. If they bug you, let the substrate dry out some more and only refill the waterdish, though it's usually not necessary.
 

UralOwl

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Apr 20, 2012
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97
Thanks for the answers. I have had a few problems with mold with some of the slings, so hopefully the springtails will take care of any mold that may show up in the slings' containers.
 

Meezerkoko

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Dec 18, 2012
Messages
156
If you want to culture them so you can them in larger quantities to be able to seed them into future enclosures all you need to do is get some of the substrate containing springtails and put it in a container and flood it with water, the springtails will float to the top (after stirring the substrate and water and allowing the substrate to settle) and you can collect them with a spoon. After that you can add them to some all natural hardwood charcoal (not the brickette form) which you've put into a Tupperware of some kind (don't vent it or you'll get mites) and add 1-2 inches of water, then just feed them a few sprinkles of brewers yeast (or uncooked white rice but that gets kinda gross because they don't eat the rice they eat the mold that will grow on it). Then just feed every 4-5 days or so. They will take off in a couple weeks and then you can sprinkle them into any enclosure you want. Also good for in any herp enclosure. Hope that helps ;) They certainly are the best way to remove mold and cut down considerably on any spot cleaning. Good for the teleport/defensive species you might work with.
 

UralOwl

Arachnosquire
Joined
Apr 20, 2012
Messages
97
If you want to culture them so you can them in larger quantities to be able to seed them into future enclosures all you need to do is get some of the substrate containing springtails and put it in a container and flood it with water, the springtails will float to the top (after stirring the substrate and water and allowing the substrate to settle) and you can collect them with a spoon. After that you can add them to some all natural hardwood charcoal (not the brickette form) which you've put into a Tupperware of some kind (don't vent it or you'll get mites) and add 1-2 inches of water, then just feed them a few sprinkles of brewers yeast (or uncooked white rice but that gets kinda gross because they don't eat the rice they eat the mold that will grow on it). Then just feed every 4-5 days or so. They will take off in a couple weeks and then you can sprinkle them into any enclosure you want. Also good for in any herp enclosure. Hope that helps ;) They certainly are the best way to remove mold and cut down considerably on any spot cleaning. Good for the teleport/defensive species you might work with.
Thanks, very informative. :) I'll try this out sometime.
 

Meezerkoko

Arachnoknight
Joined
Dec 18, 2012
Messages
156
No problem, if you ever need any springtail advice or if you just need springtails let me know.
 

Dorifto

Arachnobaron
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Aug 10, 2017
Messages
428
Welcome to the past!!!!

Please don't revive dead posts... and worse ask to a question to a guy who wrote the message back in 2013!!!

The small dots are mites, and they are harmless.
 
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Tlball87

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 14, 2020
Messages
4
They eat all the organic wastes produced by the T, ie poop, boluses etc. and mold...

You are better with them than without them.
Hi that is the spring tales enclosure not a Ts enclourse my friend gave me some and I wanted them to breed before putting them in with my Ts, it has got a a few tiny holes poked into the tub, and the mould you see is from white rice I've had them about a week and a half and started with not even a teaspoon of spring tales now I've fifty million
 

Dorifto

Arachnobaron
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428
I changed the message, when I saw the date...

The dots are mites. They are harmless too
 

Colorado Ts

Arachnobaron
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Oct 16, 2019
Messages
528
I've had springtails in several of my juvenile and adult tarantula's enclosures for nearly a year now; most of them live in the water dishes, though some also move around in the substrate in the enclosures that are kept more humid (such as my avics and LP). I've been told that they don't harm tarantulas, and they haven't done so yet so I've just let them be.

However, about a week ago, I noticed some springtails (the most I noticed was about 8 in one container) in about 4 of my tiny spiderling's containers. They don't seem to be causing any harm and the slings don't react to them, even when they're crawling around near their feet. However, I'm a bit concerned that the springtails may disturb the slings when they molt. Is this something to be worried about or should I just allow the springs and slings to co-exist?
Nothing to worry about, if anything the springtails would be more interested in the exuvia than the sling anyway.
 

Tlball87

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 14, 2020
Messages
4
Welcome to the past!!!!

Please don't revive dead posts... and worse ask to a question to a guy who wrote the message back in 2013!!!

The small dots are mites, and they are harmless.
Sorry I didnt notice the date I just searched for posts I didnt mean any harm
 

Dorifto

Arachnobaron
Active Member
Joined
Aug 10, 2017
Messages
428
Sorry I didnt notice the date I just searched for posts I didnt mean any harm
Don't worry! But as you can see people starts to answering to other people from when the TVs were in black and white... 😂
 
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