Spiderling Loose?

Darkskies

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 11, 2016
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Hi everyone,

I just went and watered my 5 spiderling enclosures. My PZB(E. campestratus) sling enclosure is a pill vial filled with dirt/coir? that I got from netbugs. I noticed that the cap was not tightly clasped shut(the front half of the cap was somewhat pointed at an angle and upwards). My PZB sling is the smallest out of all the ones I have(1/4 inch, maybe slightly smaller). I still doubt that it could have escaped as the space between the cap and pill vial was literally nothing. However, I can usually spot it when I take the vial out(usually on the surface or buried but right up against the sides). This time, I couldn't find it anywhere. I wet the substrate and dropped half a mealworm inside. I hope tomorrow the mealworm piece is gone so that I know she's still in there.

Are you all familiar with the netbug pill vials? What are the chances that the sling may have escaped? If it did escape, that's unfortunate as I spent 30 bucks on it but what concerns me more is that it might still be crawling around my apartment! If it's loose in my apartment, I'd rather just have it die instead of grow up to be a 6 inch wild tarantula that could bite me.. What are the chances it would survive and thrive into an adult loose in my apartment? Please let me know. Thanks!
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
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I don't have a clue about "netbug" pill vials, nor I can give you an answer about your issue -- I mean, chances of escapes? Check well the enclosure, before thinking that.

Anyway, assuming yes, assuming an escape occurred, the only one that will end bad is the sling. Turning "into a 6 inch wild tarantula that could bite me" ? Not even in the worst B-Movie of decades ago.

P.S

I love the fact that you seem more concerned about that laughable (considering the Theraphosidae, and size, in question) scenario, or the $30 you paid, but not so much about the sling. Search for him/her, if escaped, I say.
 

Vanessa

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I would be in tears if I lost my E.campestratus spiderling and it wouldn't be due to fear. They are out there in the unknown with no food or water and certain death in their future. I would be tearing the place apart looking for them... not because of what is in my best interest, but what is in theirs. Poor little tyke.
 

Ellenantula

Arachnoking
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Hope you can find your sling!
I would say yes, they can slip through some very small cracks -- esp a small sling.
Good luck and sending good vibes your way that you can either find him or discover he is still in his vial. (fingers crossed)
 

Crone Returns

Arachnoangel
Joined
Mar 22, 2016
Messages
990
Hi everyone,

I just went and watered my 5 spiderling enclosures. My PZB(E. campestratus) sling enclosure is a pill vial filled with dirt/coir? that I got from netbugs. I noticed that the cap was not tightly clasped shut(the front half of the cap was somewhat pointed at an angle and upwards). My PZB sling is the smallest out of all the ones I have(1/4 inch, maybe slightly smaller). I still doubt that it could have escaped as the space between the cap and pill vial was literally nothing. However, I can usually spot it when I take the vial out(usually on the surface or buried but right up against the sides). This time, I couldn't find it anywhere. I wet the substrate and dropped half a mealworm inside. I hope tomorrow the mealworm piece is gone so that I know she's still in there.

Are you all familiar with the netbug pill vials? What are the chances that the sling may have escaped? If it did escape, that's unfortunate as I spent 30 bucks on it but what concerns me more is that it might still be crawling around my apartment! If it's loose in my apartment, I'd rather just have it die instead of grow up to be a 6 inch wild tarantula that could bite me.. What are the chances it would survive and thrive into an adult loose in my apartment? Please let me know. Thanks!
Glad to see that your priorities are in the correct spot:meh::rage:
 

dopamine

Arachnobaron
Joined
Feb 7, 2010
Messages
341
Best of luck to you and the spider.
In some insane scenario where the tarantula did somehow survive until adulthood, that's one of the last species you'd have to worry about "biting you". They're puppy dogs.
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
Staff member
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Feb 22, 2013
Messages
3,290
A sling will die without proper care. Most die in their natural environment when in the wild, let alone when in a different continent. So, concerning your worry about it growing up... don't worry. It will 100%, absolutely, certainly die before then if you don't find it.

As for you worrying about the life of a creature that you were caring for? Yeah, you should be worrying about that. Unfortunately, for a sling that small, I'd have little hope of finding it.
 

Darkskies

Arachnopeon
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Sep 11, 2016
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0
Thanks for all of the replies and I really appreciated the ones who answered my questions without judgment. Turns out that the sling is still in her vial! She has dragged the mealworm piece to a burrow and I was able to spot legs and a tiny body scrunched right up against it. I'm so happy now.

I apologize that the wording in my post was a bit direct and highlighted my concern for my own safety over that of the spider's. To be honest, I did feel let down that I may have lost the tiny sling(not only because of the monetary loss) but as I am a newbie tarantula keeper, I still am somewhat leery of the adults. In fact, I only have slings and do not have any experience with adult tarantulas.

On the other hand, I will fully admit that I don't have the same emotional attachment to my slings as I do to my reptiles or that I would have to other vertebrates and warm-blooded animals. I am fascinated by tarantulas' appearance, habits, and behavior. It is my duty to be the steward of my new charges and look after their well-being. However, these animals are emotionless, potentially harmful, instinctual creatures incapable of understanding or returning affection. To my knowledge there is no evidence that they can even feel pain. The suggestion of "tearing apart my house" to look for a translucent 1/4" sling made me laugh out loud considering the hopelessness of such a task.

I also think it's ironic that some of the people here who are supposedly such caring and sensitive individuals DELIGHT in seeing their spiders take on mice or other vertebrate prey: animals that suffer, cry out, and squeal as they are envenomated and violently killed by a fearsome, unfeeling predator. Must be a terrible way to die.

Again, I am not trying to ruffle anyone's feathers. This forum and the members here have been an IMMEASURABLE help to me as I embark on becoming a budding arachnid enthusiast. I truly do appreciate the advice, help, and knowledge provided by the community here.
 
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Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
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However, these animals are emotionless, potentially harmful, instinctual creatures incapable of understanding or returning affection.
False. Actually the Goddess loves me & I love the Goddess. I always kiss her enclosure when she grant me the honor to see part of her body or lovely eyes. Facts :-s
 

Crone Returns

Arachnoangel
Joined
Mar 22, 2016
Messages
990
Thanks for all of the replies and I really appreciated the ones who answered my questions without judgment. Turns out that the sling is still in her vial! She has dragged the mealworm piece to a burrow and I was able to spot legs and a tiny body scrunched right up against it. I'm so happy now.

I apologize that the wording in my post was a bit direct and highlighted my concern for my own safety over that of the spider's. To be honest, I did feel let down that I may have lost the tiny sling(not only because of the monetary loss) but as I am a newbie tarantula keeper, I still am somewhat leery of the adults. In fact, I only have slings and do not have any experience with adult tarantulas.

On the other hand, I will fully admit that I don't have the same emotional attachment to my slings as I do to my reptiles or that I would have to other vertebrates and warm-blooded animals. I am fascinated by tarantulas' appearance, habits, and behavior. It is my duty to be the steward of my new charges and look after their well-being. However, these animals are emotionless, potentially harmful, instinctual creatures incapable of understanding or returning affection. To my knowledge there is no evidence that they can even feel pain. The suggestion of "tearing apart my house" to look for a translucent 1/4" sling made me laugh out loud considering the hopelessness of such a task.

I also think it's ironic that some of the people here who are supposedly such caring and sensitive individuals DELIGHT in seeing their spiders take on mice or other vertebrate prey: animals that suffer, cry out, and squeal as they are envenomated and violently killed by a fearsome, unfeeling predator. Must be a terrible way to die.

Again, I am not trying to ruffle anyone's feathers. This forum and the members here have been an IMMEASURABLE help to me as I embark on becoming a budding arachnid enthusiast. I truly do appreciate the advice, help, and knowledge provided by the community here.
Spiders are one of the most harmless, most helpful creatures on earth. I suggest that you learn, read up on these marvelous creatures. As for the harm they do pertaining to yourself, I suggest that NW spiders, who are docile with weaker venom than OWs, hardly ever threat pose and bite. If they do, it's the handler's fault, not the spider.
Ask questions of the old timers here: sdsnybny, cold blood, chris, eulersk, trenor and many more.
 

Vanessa

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I also think it's ironic that some of the people here who are supposedly such caring and sensitive individuals DELIGHT in seeing their spiders take on mice or other vertebrate prey
Incorrect. Not one person who responded to this post has supported the gratuitous feeding of vertebrates to tarantulas. And it is ironic that someone has just posted about this very thing and not received any support in doing so. They have received the opposite, actually.
If you're going to try to deflect the blame onto others - it might be a good idea to ensure that it will stick first.
 
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mack1855

Arachnobaron
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Not sure what to say .If you feel you have no attachment,maybe this isn't the hobby/intrest for you.
I'm glad your sling was still with you.Possibly find someone to take it off your hands,and then move
on ,and dont continue with T,s.They will be the ones that suffer.
 

Draketeeth

Arachnoknight
Joined
Mar 22, 2015
Messages
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Turns out that the sling is still in her vial! She has dragged the mealworm piece to a burrow and I was able to spot legs and a tiny body scrunched right up against it. I'm so happy now.
Huzzah! Glad there was no breakout. Since you know the lid could be a problem, the biggest task now is to make sure it's always seated properly when you're done working with the spider so there is no breakout. If the container is new, it could just be a break-in issue and will get better with use. When I had a sling container from a different seller, it was a real pain to open and close, and caused me some concern about its ability to contain the inhabitant. Thankfully with repeated opening and closing it became easier, and I never worry about it now.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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I also think it's ironic that some of the people here who are supposedly such caring and sensitive individuals DELIGHT in seeing their spiders take on mice or other vertebrate prey: animals that suffer, cry out, and squeal as they are envenomated and violently killed by a fearsome, unfeeling predator. Must be a terrible way to die.
I can't tell what direction you are coming from just based on your words, ie pro-vertebrate dinners or anti-vertebrate dinners for Ts ;)

I can see why one might think it's ironic. I also think it's important to keep things in the proper context too. There is nothing wrong with feeding certain Ts the occasional vertebrate. They eat them in the wild.
 

Tim Benzedrine

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Well, it could be argued that is by both necessity and happenstance. In the wild, the spider has to take whatever it gets, and like the Tenneyson poem says,"Nature red in tooth and claw." This does not negate the fact that there is anything inherently wrong with doing so, but more of an issue of whether it is needed. Personally, I don't think the spiders benefit and think that if was needed, not as many people would have successfully raised tarantulas to maturity on an insect staple. And maybe fewer would survive in a wild environment, because capturing vertebrates is a trickier and riskier accomplishment. Finally, judging by the time I have sometimes seen it take for a cricket to bite the dust after being bitten, I'd think that the process would be even slower and more tortuous for still larger prey. But that is just speculation.
 
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ZombieDarkblade

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Not sure what to say .If you feel you have no attachment,maybe this isn't the hobby/intrest for you.
I'm glad your sling was still with you.Possibly find someone to take it off your hands,and then move
on ,and dont continue with T,s.They will be the ones that suffer.
 

Asgiliath

Arachnobaron
Joined
May 4, 2019
Messages
406
Unfortunately, I’ve never seen a sling again after an escape. I hope yours is just hiding well.

(Not to mention, my stupid ass had a 5 inch b. hamorii disappear in my house.)
 
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