Spider Identification

Arthroverts

Arachnoprince
Active Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2016
Messages
1,237
@GWENHA, a top-down photo with better lighting would be helpful to verify if it is a huge wolf spider or a possible Calisoga sp.

Thanks,

Arthroverts
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
3,598
Is this a calisoga longitarsis? I found it last night in my garage. I live is San Francisco Bay Area.
Looks like a Calisoga -- I can't be sure of the species, as there may be other species of Calisoga in California.
 

dangerforceidle

Arachnodemon
Active Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2017
Messages
688
Tough to say, but I don't think it is a Calisoga sp. @Smokehound714 may be able help ID it further.

Thanks,

Arthroverts
What makes you think it isn't Calisoga? Seems to be from my perspective: the macrosetae spines on the legs are pretty telling. There have been a lot of them found and posted to /r/spiders recently as well, so the males are definitely out in abundance.
 

Arthroverts

Arachnoprince
Active Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2016
Messages
1,237
What makes you think it isn't Calisoga? Seems to be from my perspective: the macrosetae spines on the legs are pretty telling. There have been a lot of them found and posted to /r/spiders recently as well, so the males are definitely out in abundance.
I dunno, something is just throwing me, although it very well could be a Calisoga. I am by no means an expert, so if you are steeped in the ways of Calisoga I will defer to you :). That's one of the reasons I always try to tag in others with my posts to get more eyes on the subject at hand.

Thanks,

Arthroverts
 

dangerforceidle

Arachnodemon
Active Member
Joined
Aug 4, 2017
Messages
688
I dunno, something is just throwing me, although it very well could be a Calisoga. I am by no means an expert, so if you are steeped in the ways of Calisoga I will defer to you :). That's one of the reasons I always try to tag in others with my posts to get more eyes on the subject at hand
Definitely not trying to call you out in any way or take the position that you're definitely incorrect, I was just curious if there was a specific feature that you noticed that was pointing you in another direction. You could be correct.

From my perspective it does seem consistent with other recent examples, but there's always wiggle room when making ID attempts from photos.
 

checkmate

Arachnoknight
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Jan 15, 2013
Messages
159
What makes you think it isn't Calisoga? Seems to be from my perspective: the macrosetae spines on the legs are pretty telling. There have been a lot of them found and posted to /r/spiders recently as well, so the males are definitely out in abundance.
Agree with Calisoga sp.
 

Arthroverts

Arachnoprince
Active Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2016
Messages
1,237
Definitely not trying to call you out in any way or take the position that you're definitely incorrect, I was just curious if there was a specific feature that you noticed that was pointing you in another direction. You could be correct.

From my perspective it does seem consistent with other recent examples, but there's always wiggle room when making ID attempts from photos.
If I'm wrong, I need to be called out on it (just like everyone else needs to be in my opinion). Otherwise false information can spread, and as we all know that can lead to the needless deaths of many a specimen (like what happens with so many Avics, unfortunately).

Thanks,

Arthroverts
 

AphonopelmaTX

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
May 7, 2004
Messages
1,228
Looks like a Calisoga -- I can't be sure of the species, as there may be other species of Calisoga in California.
For the time being, there is only the one species of Calisoga in the USA, Calisoga longitarsus from central and northern California. The spider pictured here is definitely C. longitarsus as it is the only non-tarantula mygale that is large and hairy. For more info, see "Spiders of North America An Identification Manual 2nd Edition" by Ubick, et. al.
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
3,598
For the time being, there is only the one species of Calisoga in the USA, Calisoga longitarsus from central and northern California. The spider pictured here is definitely C. longitarsus as it is the only non-tarantula mygale that is large and hairy. For more info, see "Spiders of North America An Identification Manual 2nd Edition" by Ubick, et. al.
Interesting. I was led astray by BugGuide, which has some finds classified only to the genus level, implying there are other options.
 
Top