Spider ID?

Cazador

Arachnosquire
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Feb 11, 2016
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This is the second spider of this species I've found in my bathroom this month. I hate to make a thread for it but I haven't had much luck with google, can anyone help me ID this?
 

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Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
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This is the second spider of this species I've found in my bathroom this month. I hate to make a thread for it but I haven't had much luck with google, can anyone help me ID this?
  1. Where, geographically speaking, was the spider found? (The U.S. is a big place.)
  2. Do you have any photos that show more detail?
 

Cazador

Arachnosquire
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Oops thought I added that, I'm in northeast Florida. It was moving fast so I don't have any better pics. It was pretty much a solid brown, there were no markings that I could see and I couldn't get a good look at its face to at least narrow it down.
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
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Oops thought I added that, I'm in northeast Florida. It was moving fast so I don't have any better pics. It was pretty much a solid brown, there were no markings that I could see and I couldn't get a good look at its face to at least narrow it down.
What time of day was it? Was there any web? When you say it was moving fast, did it appear to have good traction outside of the web? Was it good at climbing?

I can't be 100% certain from these images, but here are some possibilities that come to mind:
  • Corinnidae (ground sac spiders and antmimics) do not build webs. They are very fast and often adept at climbing smooth surfaces. (When I catch them, they run circles around the jar, climbing up and down as they go.) There is an introduced species in Florida called Falconina gracilis that looks a little like your spider.
  • Metaltella simoni is an introduced species. It builds an irregular web out of cribellate silk.
  • Amaurobiidae (hacklemesh weavers) build irregular webs out of cribellate silk.
  • Cobweb spiders (Theridiidae) tend to have a harder time getting traction outside of the web and may appear slow and/or ungainly.

It's definitely nothing medically significant, in case that was a concern.
 

Cazador

Arachnosquire
Joined
Feb 11, 2016
Messages
54
What time of day was it? Was there any web? When you say it was moving fast, did it appear to have good traction outside of the web? Was it good at climbing?

I can't be 100% certain from these images, but here are some possibilities that come to mind:
  • Corinnidae (ground sac spiders and antmimics) do not build webs. They are very fast and often adept at climbing smooth surfaces. (When I catch them, they run circles around the jar, climbing up and down as they go.) There is an introduced species in Florida called Falconina gracilis that looks a little like your spider.
  • Metaltella simoni is an introduced species. It builds an irregular web out of cribellate silk.
  • Amaurobiidae (hacklemesh weavers) build irregular webs out of cribellate silk.
  • Cobweb spiders (Theridiidae) tend to have a harder time getting traction outside of the web and may appear slow and/or ungainly.

It's definitely nothing medically significant, in case that was a concern.
Both times were at night, but I didn't see any web. It didn't seem to have trouble moving on the tile floor, although now that I think of it it wasn't exactly sprinting, just didnt hold still long enough to get a clear shot. It looks almost identical to Amaurobiidae or Theridiidae, especially the latter. Thanks for helping me narrow it down!
 
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