spider advice

r_cafin

Arachnopeon
Joined
Oct 22, 2002
Messages
28
thank you all for your helpful answers they were very useful.. now i have another question as a beginner what would another good starter be i have researched a pink toe also known as a avicularia avicularia..is this a good starter also..and for any of you that have been in this awhile how hard are the birdeaters and goliath pinkfoot and oklahoma browns to keep and how much experience should one need to get one...any help will be useful as i am new to this and very interested in learning the ropes of being a successful T owner...thanks Ryan
 

Vayu Son

Avatar of Anansi
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 19, 2002
Messages
809
><

The Tarantula Keepers Guide by Schultz and Schultz will tell you about everything you need to know. Otherwise your gonna have to ask some more specific questions. There is no quantitative measurement of personal experience and the difficulty of the species is relative to the keeper.

-V
 

atavuss

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 16, 2002
Messages
1,034
Re: ><

Originally posted by Vayu Son
The Tarantula Keepers Guide by Schultz and Schultz will tell you about everything you need to know. Otherwise your gonna have to ask some more specific questions. There is no quantitative measurement of personal experience and the difficulty of the species is relative to the keeper.

-V
another good book is "tarantulas and other arachnids" by marshall.
your favorite book retailer should be able to get them both for a total of around 20.00.
Ed
 

Code Monkey

Arachnoemperor
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 22, 2002
Messages
3,786
That's not entirely true, Vayu.
The Ok. Browns is a southwestern Aphonopelma, that equals easier than dirt to keep healthy since humidity is not an issue. Give'em a water bowl, some crickets every now and again, and you've got a happy, healthy spider.

Conversely, T. blondi and T. apophysis both require moist environments, that equals maintenance, that equals more difficulty. Likewise, I don't know about the apophysis, but blondi slings have a fairly high mortality even with experienced keepers.

So, while it's true that difficulty is relative to the keeper, you can still point out some truths about the different species. Me, although I'm experienced, I also know that I'm not the greatest person on religious maintenance of anything - I'm not about to spend the money for a blondi or aphophysis slings even I were super interested in them only so I can kill them a year from now accidentally. I tailor what I buy to the sort of care I want to give and the maintenance level I want to deal with - that's one of the key secrets to keeping any pets.

No tarantula is difficult - it's simply a matter of guaging how familiar you are with their behavior and needs against what sort of care you can give them. If you match your knowledge level with motivation to give care, no species you choose should be out of your reach - just make sure you do the research ahead of time so you know what you're getting into.
 
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