1. Important Announcement - Upcoming Downtime - Software Upgrade

    Please see here for more details.
Hello there, why not take a few seconds to register on our forums and become part of the community? Just click here.

Species specific info on Amblypygi

Discussion in 'Other Spiders & Arachnids' started by spodermin, Jan 14, 2020.

  1. spodermin

    spodermin Arachnosquire

    Advertisement
    I'm trying to get into keeping and breeding Amblypygi, but can't seem to find much species-specific information. I basically want to know things like

    -which ones grow the fastest?
    -which ones grow the largest?
    -which are most resilient?
    -which are the most common as pets?
    etc.

    Yesterday I just bought my first one (damon diadem) which I took out of the deli cup and put into a temporary enclosure till I could rehouse it tomorrow, and I came out this morning to find it tried to molt on the ground and died.

    The list in the image is what I currently have available to me.
     

    Attached Files:

    • Clarification Please Clarification Please x 1
    • Love Love x 1
  2. Dr Linda Rayor of cornell university has done a lot of communal research on these, and Orin Mcmonigle has a great book about these. Damon is a great starter species, I have a juvinile. They are great eaters. They molt upside down, and need humidity. Keep all amblys with springtail and possibly isopods. The largest Ive seen are E. amanica, or heterophrynus batesii. Damon and (possibly) Paraphrynus (im not entirely sure about this one) are the most common as far as I know. The ones most common are usually also the most resilient. Best of luck with your new pet!!
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  3. Albireo Wulfbooper

    Albireo Wulfbooper Arachnopeon Active Member

    So you've discovered rule # 1, which is that amblypygi need a vertical surface for molting or they will die. Please don't purchase another until you've learnt a bit more and have an appropriate enclosure ready. I'm afraid I can't help with your other questions.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. wizentrop

    wizentrop to the rescue! Old Timer

    This is such an incorrect statement that I don't know where to begin. The pet trade is first and foremost a business, so it helps to be realistic here.
    The most common ones are the ones that are:
    a) easiest to import at a given point in time (WC Damon medius, Phrynus marginemaculatus)
    b) prolific and reproduce well under captive conditions (Damon diadema, Phrynus barbadensis)
    c) able to reproduce parthenogenetically (Charinus acosta)

    However, the most resilient species are Acanthophrynus coronatus, Paraphrynus cubensis, Phrynus whitei, and Phrynus barbadensis.
    As you can see Damon is not on this list. Most Paraphrynus have a seasonal activity pattern, so they are not the easiest as well. Heterophrynus are fragile. And so on.
     
    • Informative Informative x 3
    • Helpful Helpful x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. StampFan

    StampFan Arachnodemon Active Member

    I'm in Canada with the same availability list, and have the same basic questions really.
     
  6. StampFan

    StampFan Arachnodemon Active Member

    Wouldn't isopods climb the wood and munch on a molting individual?
     
  7. Albireo Wulfbooper

    Albireo Wulfbooper Arachnopeon Active Member

    Yes, that is a potential danger of keeping them together. I personally wouldn't risk putting isopods in an amblypygi enclosure.
     
  8. Albireo Wulfbooper

    Albireo Wulfbooper Arachnopeon Active Member

    I think if you want a big impressive specimen fairly quickly without a lot of fuss, A. coronatus is probably a good bet.
     
    • Helpful Helpful x 1
  9. However, the most resilient species are Acanthophrynus coronatus, Paraphrynus cubensis, Phrynus whitei, and Phrynus barbadensis.
    As you can see Damon is not on this list. Most Paraphrynus have a seasonal activity pattern, so they are not the easiest as well. Heterophrynus are fragile. And so on.
     
  10. sorry i dont know how to actually do the quotes lol. I misspoke, and you're totally right. Stupid response on my part, and I apologize for any problems this caused.
     
  11. wizentrop

    wizentrop to the rescue! Old Timer

    I hope what I said didn't come off as an attack (if so - my apologies). There was nothing stupid in what you said, sometimes there is another aspect to the bigger picture.
    We (I mean Canadians) are fortunate to have such an impressive availability of different Amblypygi species to choose from, something out neighbours can only dream of...
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  12. Arthroverts

    Arthroverts Arachnoprince Active Member

    But for how much longer? We're on to you Canadians, and it's only a matter of time now...

    Thanks,

    Arthroverts
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Funny Funny x 1
  13. I've heard both sides. I've heard from a lot of people dwarf white isopods will remain under the soil, and wont bother your a
    all good man, I’m just one of those people who apologize for everything lol. And I truly envy you guys and your (I think) relaxed/ more plentiful availability in terms of inverts
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. Arthroverts

    Arthroverts Arachnoprince Active Member

    For isopods with amblypygi, I kept Trichorhina tomentosa with Phrynus marginemaculatus without any issues.

    Thanks,

    Arthroverts
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Informative Informative x 2
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.