Sort of beginner species...

dannyboypede

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
142
Hello Arachnoreaders,
I have never posted anything on the scorpion forum, because I find them a bit boring. I have a flat rock that just sits around all of the time...:wall: I want a scorpion that is a good eater, uses its stinger to kill prey (I'm tired of seeing my flat rock not eat/not use its stinger), not going to kill me or send me or my family to the hospital, is easy to care for, and can be kept at around 76 degrees. I won't handle it or any thing stupid like that. I am also not prepared to spend more than 30 bucks. I basically want the LP of scorpions {D!!
Thanks for suggestions,
Dan
 

Nomadinexile

Arachnoking
Old Timer
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Apr 8, 2009
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2,675
Centruroides vittatus can be had for cheap. They are not dangerous compared to most buthids, but have a painful sting. They can be kept communally, with an occasional loss. They can handle a fairly wide temp. and humidity range. They are aboreal, and can therefor often be seen hanging or walking on their cork bark. They are aggressive feeders and will use their "stinger". :)
 

KvMccur

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 4, 2010
Messages
9
With all due respect, your question is a bit odd. If you want an active, stinging scorpion, you have to go with the smaller, deadlier species, mid-east or african. Their bodies and pincers are small, so they sting more readily, but pack deadly venom, so not safe for the family. If you want an active scorpion, lean toward the a USA breed or African emporer. Both are active, but have larger pincers so do not use their stinger as much. A "Desert Hairy" scorpion is very active at night, but only uses it's stinger against large prey.

You will find a hard time locating an active scorpion, that uses it's stinger, and is not dangerous. If it uses it's stinger. that is always a problem. I have handled and been stung by the Arizona species, but again, scorpions can be so small, that if you have a family, with kids, I would not recommend a scorpion at all, other than an African Emperor in a secure, escape proof environment. A word of caution though, if you have kids in the house, please do not have a scorpion there also. Your children may be allergic to their venom, and you would never know.
 

Nomadinexile

Arachnoking
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Kv, your comment is quite odd as well. Lots of people have kids and scorpions in the same house. Dogs are many factors more dangerous than scorpions to children. If it is housed properly, it is no more dangerous than a goldfish.

Scorpion venom in many species is no more dangerous than bees, even less so in some species. There is a correlation in allergic reactions between scorpion and bee venom as well. Should we keep our kids indoors all summer long because they may be allergic as well? We can't ever keep kids 100% safe, that is impossible, unless you keep them locked in a closet, which would be cruel. All you can do is minimize it.

Me? I'd rather have a child hold an Emperor than take a ride to the grocery store, it's much safer. If this guy knows how to keep scorpions, than he can keep any specie, but certainly an emp wouldn't be dangerous! :razz:

Take it down a notch, they aren't killing machines, and they can be easily contained. ;)

P.S., many kids growing up in Texas are stung by C. vittatus. Hardly any go to the hospital, and not one has ever died that we know of.
 

KvMccur

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 4, 2010
Messages
9
Regarding scorpions, I will only add that I have kept everything from a Deathstalker to an African Emperor. The Emperor was hesitant about stinging, as was the Desert Hairy scorpion, The others, from the Mid-East and Africa, were as venemous as a cobra. I had been bitten by a rattlesnake years before, so had little feeling, due to a loss of circulation as a result from that venom, in a left finger. The Desert Hairy however, I handeled readily, and once stung me in that hand to no avail while I held it, and then proceeded to "corkscrew" it's stinger into my hand and turn it repeatedly. If you keep a scorpion around, know their business and what they will do. Please do not keep them around children.
 

dannyboypede

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
142
Alright, let's not turn this into one of the threads about kids and inverts and dogs and cars and maturity. I thought I read somewhere that there was a scorpion that was aggressive but didn't have very potent venom. Thanks for the help Nomadinexile. C. vittatus sounds interesting and I would tend to agree with you. I am not interested in a scorpion that could kill me, which is why I ask for suggestions of aggressive yet non-potent venom possessing scorps. Scorpions are the only invert group that could really kill me, so I want to be sure I don't buy anything that is too dangerous.
Thanks,
Dan
 

Canth

Arachnolord
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 16, 2005
Messages
655
The others, from the Mid-East and Africa, were as venemous as a cobra.
This is nonsense. Where did you pull that from?

And not all scorpions that use their stingers are deadly or dangerous, many small, not-so-potent Buthids fit his requirements just fine. Hottentotta species come to mind, they're always really defensive but don't pack too bad of a sting. Any Centrurodies species use their stingers, as do B. jacksoni which have neat coloration. I would add B. jacksoni as another good species.
 

Nomadinexile

Arachnoking
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Kv,

1. Read the Original Post again. He's not holding his.

2. What you've kept has no bearing on this conversation, but congrats.

3. P. imperator hardly ever sting.

4. H. arizonensis readily sting.

5. "The Others" what?

6. No scorpion is as venomous as a cobra. Maybe in LD, but the venom quantity is not even comparable. This statement shows a lack of understanding.

7. You don't need to know their behavior if you are not handling them.

8. Cut the bull about keeping them near children. It's fear mongering at its worse. You obviously are not adept at interacting with venomous animals due to your obvious failures, rattlesnake bite, and general lack of knowledge.
There is no reason someone who acts responsibly can't keep scorpions in a house with children. Although in your case, I would recommend following your own advice. Others however are able to due so without problem.

I respectfully ask that you cut this non-sense out. It doesn't make any sense for one, and for two, people here know better.

If you have the continued need to talk like this, go to yahoo answers pet section and attempt to wow the kids with stories of stupidly handling highly defensive species, rattlesnake bites, and fear mongering about scorpions.
People here are not impressed, I assure you.

Thanks, Ryan


Regarding scorpions, I will only add that I have kept
everything from a Deathstalker to an African Emperor. The Emperor was hesitant about stinging, as was the Desert Hairy scorpion, The others, from the Mid-East and Africa, were as venemous as a cobra. I had been bitten by a rattlesnake years before, so had little feeling, due to a loss of circulation as a result from that venom, in a left finger. The Desert Hairy however, I handeled readily, and once stung me in that hand to no avail while I held it, and then proceeded to "corkscrew" it's stinger into my hand and turn it repeatedly. If you keep a scorpion around, know their business and what they will do. Please do not keep them around children.
 

Nomadinexile

Arachnoking
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Joined
Apr 8, 2009
Messages
2,675
There are very, very few scorpions that can kill a healthy adult, barring an allergic reaction. Small children have a wider list of possibly lethal scorpions.

Stay away from Centruroides species besides C. vittatus and C. hentizi. There are C. gracilis populations that are not dangerous, but there are populations would could be problematic for a child, and mistakes are made sometimes.

Stay away from Genus' Tityus, Androctonus, and Parabuthus. Most of the other "dangerous" species are not available in the trade, and would be fairly expensive if they ever are.

If you have any questions about specific species, feel free to ask here, search here, or google. If you find species listed as 3 or 4 on a 4 scale, or 4 or 5 on a 5 scale, you should reconsider those species. C. vittatus are generally 2.5 on a 4 scale.

Have fun! Scorpions are awesome. Just be careful, they are addictive! :D

Alright, let's not turn this into one of the threads about kids and inverts and dogs and cars and maturity. I thought I read somewhere that there was a scorpion that was aggressive but didn't have very potent venom. Thanks for the help Nomadinexile. C. vittatus sounds interesting and I would tend to agree with you. I am not interested in a scorpion that could kill me, which is why I ask for suggestions of aggressive yet non-potent venom possessing scorps. Scorpions are the only invert group that could really kill me, so I want to be sure I don't buy anything that is too dangerous.
Thanks,
Dan
 

KvMccur

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 4, 2010
Messages
9
Please do not condiscend to tell me to take it down a notch. I kept many scorpions when they were all legal to keep, in the 70's you could keep everything, and then went out of country and saw what they can do. Easily contained? How many people per year endanger the exotic pet trade because their "easily contained" exotic species got out? Assume everyone one is irresponsible until you see their set up, and do not dispense advise when you have nothing else to provide. I kept these for many years, all kinds, but would NOT recommend them to a family. I have reasons for that.

Kevin

Ryan,

Bit by the rattlesnake in the desert protecting my son, stung by my nephews scorpion that got out. Not trying to impress anyone. These forums have changed, will not continue to post. <edit>.
 
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Treynok

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
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May 17, 2009
Messages
202
I would suggest H arizonensis as they can get fairly large, are very active if given the right substrate to dig in, mine uses it's telson every time I feed it even know it wouldn't have to it would seem. It would also be ok around 76 degrees. I love these scorpions, quickly became one of my favorites. They also don't require high humidity and are not too costly anymore.
 

Nomadinexile

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 8, 2009
Messages
2,675
Please do not condiscend to tell me to take it down a notch. I kept many scorpions when they were all legal to keep, in the 70's you could keep everything, and then went out of country and saw what they can do. Easily contained? How many people per year endanger the exotic pet trade because their "easily contained" exotic species got out? Assume everyone one is irresponsible until you see their set up, and do not dispense advise when you have nothing else to provide. I kept these for many years, all kinds, but would NOT recommend them to a family. I have reasons for that.

Kevin
Ryan,

Bit by the rattlesnake in the desert protecting my son, stung by my nephews scorpion that got out. Not trying to impress anyone. These forums have changed, will not continue to post. <edit>.
Don't be condescending? You are cussing by acronym in a forum that is all ages.

You are stating incorrect information that is irrelevant to the thread in a forum where facts are to be respected.

You have had "all kinds", who is this, Sarah Palin?

You live in Texas, all scorpions are legal to keep, as well as in 90% of the rest of America. However, if you keep screaming Cobra Venom on threads about milder species, that could change. Thanks a lot.

As for containment, scorpions are easily contained, but easy is relative depending on your mental capacity. Speaking of which, why were you letting your nephew keep a scorpion in a way that it could get out? Surely with all your experience you could have corrected that. Secondly, H.a.'s don't charge, they hold their ground or run. If you kept "all kinds", you should have been able to corral it without getting stung.

As for the rattlesnake, you got bit defending your son huh? Interesting. Because rattlesnakes are not aggressive either, well, maybe very rarely. But just like scorpions, they don't want to pick a fight with a human.

How is it you are willing to tell us lots of things that irrelevant to this thread, yet are unwilling to state why you think families shouldn't keep them? Really? After all the non-sense you've posted, after cussing, after lying.... You can't say why you came and ruined this thread in the first place?

I don't care whether or not you keep posting on the forum or not. I would actually prefer you stayed so you could get educated about scorpions. However, if you do stay, please refrain from cussing. Also, before you go spouting things as facts, make sure you know they are facts. Because your above posts have glaring errors.

If you want to continue this conversation with me, please do it by P.M. You've hijacked this thread with enough drivel to fill a professional football stadium already. This is a fact based forum, and should stay that way.

Thanks, Ryan
 
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Gnat

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 16, 2009
Messages
286
H. arizonensis are a good scorp, big and quick with the stinger, mine was pretty active. B. jacksoni are good too, mine eat quite a bit and sting often. they are a Buthid but i dont think are medically significant.
 

AzJohn

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 25, 2007
Messages
2,181
Hello Arachnoreaders,
I have never posted anything on the scorpion forum, because I find them a bit boring. I have a flat rock that just sits around all of the time...:wall: I want a scorpion that is a good eater, uses its stinger to kill prey (I'm tired of seeing my flat rock not eat/not use its stinger), not going to kill me or send me or my family to the hospital, is easy to care for, and can be kept at around 76 degrees. I won't handle it or any thing stupid like that. I am also not prepared to spend more than 30 bucks. I basically want the LP of scorpions {D!!
Thanks for suggestions,
Dan
Anything that is not in the family Buthidae should be fine. (I know about the oddballs but they aren't in the US hobby). Most buthids are fine as well. There are only a very few dangerous species in the US hobby. Nomad mentioned most of them. I'd add hottentotta as well. A few of them are very nasty.

You might want to consider Vaejovis spinigerus/Hoffmannius spinigerus. They are small harmless scorpions that eat well and can be very feisty. Honnestly though, native Centruroides are crazy eaters. Seriously taking food items twice there size. They are buthids but the last death was in the 60s. Amazing what modern medicine can do. The AZ species, Centruroides Sculpturatus, is the worst species as far as venom and the only one with recorded deaths (correct me if I'm mistaken). The nonnative Centruroides can be nasty, if you find any for sale in the US let me know right away so I can get them.

John
 

cannabeast

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jun 29, 2010
Messages
143
I don't think i would assume everyone is irresonsible, unless i was also afraid of my own shadow and haunted by my nightmares as well. ROFL this thread is filled with so much jibber jabber its like having a Schizophrenic writing a review of Mein Kampf in outer space.. and LOL Nomadinexile thank you, I appreciate you defending our families, my children included, from dangerous ignorance. we all appreciate your factual honesty :D THIS IS A CIRCUS! ZOMG A CIRCUS! newb scorpions are usually pandinus species, but there are many more that are good for newbs, they just arent easy to find. im keeping Ophistancanthus Madagascariensis right now, they seem to be very nice for beginners, but they arent very aggresive.. I kept heterometrus swammerdami recently, they wer super cool and BIG! if you try to interact with they they would act like a rattlesnake(just sit there and hiss but not attack) they sting some big roaches! actually ive seen some emperor scorpions sting crickets and stuff, but yeah it doesnt happen too often. smokin' with ciggarettes, sarah palin!

more on this later!

<('_')>

Please do not condiscend to tell me to take it down a notch. I kept many scorpions when they were all legal to keep, in the 70's you could keep everything, and then went out of country and saw what they can do. Easily contained? How many people per year endanger the exotic pet trade because their "easily contained" exotic species got out? Assume everyone one is irresponsible until you see their set up, and do not dispense advise when you have nothing else to provide. I kept these for many years, all kinds, but would NOT recommend them to a family. I have reasons for that.

Kevin
 
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dannyboypede

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
142
Desert hairs seem interesting. I thought I read somewhere that it is hard to get them to molt because they like it bone dry at the surface and slightly humid in their burrows. How fast do B. jacksoni grow? I saw some 2i for sale on the boards, and if I get one, I don't want to have to wait 5 years for it to gain any serious size. How big do jacksoni get and how big is second instar?
Thanks a lot,
Dan
 

Treynok

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
May 17, 2009
Messages
202
I think one of the biggest reasons people have so much trouble with H arizonensis molting is because they keep them too dry. They need a good gradient but if the tank is set up correctly it's not hard to maintain. There is a fine line to balance between mycosis and dessication or a bad molt from what I read. I keep mine fairly moist deeper down and haven't had a mycosis or molt problem in almost 2 years now with 1 successful molt.

2nd instar for most scorpions is tiny except some of the larger ones like Pandinus and Heterometrus. Probably around 1/4 an inch as a guess. Jacksoni are a good communal once grown if you want more than one in a tank. I'd keep them separate until adulthood or close to it though.
 

Sleazoid

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jul 18, 2010
Messages
241
If no one has figured it out yet KvMccur is a troll. Look at all of his posts, it is just nonsense and clearly he knows nothing about keeping any exotic animal at all. Do not let him get to you folks. Even if I did enjoy seeing Nomad destroy him. It is probably just a child trying to act cool and smart...that or a really pathetic adult.
 

the toe cutter

Arachnobaron
Joined
Mar 20, 2010
Messages
424
This is all quite amusing:rolleyes:! I keep Venomous snakes as well as about 15 different species of scorpions some of which are pretty hot and have a wife, an 11yr old daughter and a 2 year old son. When properly cared for and housed there is little to no real concern for escapes or endangerment to your family. And right now in the US exotic hobby I'm fairly sure that its not the scorpions and tarantulas that are giving exotic keepers the bad rap. And as far as the comment about scorpions being as venomous as cobras, is like saying a Copperhead is just as venomous as a Bushmaster because of similar venom proteins and characteristics. It is simply not the case as stated above by numerous other people. If you are unsure there are plenty of sting reports for alot of different species here on AB. Though experiences may differ lol!

But anyway, I would agree that some other good, fast, active scorps by genus are Vaejovis(spastic and alot of fun), Hadrurus, Smeringerus(VERY FAST), Opistothalmus(very defensive), Hottentotta, Heterometrus and quite few others. But I will say that I find Flat rocks and Emps to be very interesting inverts and great species for not only beginners but anyone who likes scorions. Flat rocks are some of the most different looking scorps, in my opinion, out there. But I guess it all depends on what you are looking for in particular. Hope that helps
 

the toe cutter

Arachnobaron
Joined
Mar 20, 2010
Messages
424
Desert hairs seem interesting. I thought I read somewhere that it is hard to get them to molt because they like it bone dry at the surface and slightly humid in their burrows. How fast do B. jacksoni grow? I saw some 2i for sale on the boards, and if I get one, I don't want to have to wait 5 years for it to gain any serious size. How big do jacksoni get and how big is second instar?
Thanks a lot,
Dan
B jacksoni, with proper heat, humidity and feeding actually grow pretty quick. I bought first female about a year ago and she is now bigger than the other 2 adult males and 1 adult female I just purchased recently. She is a little over 3in from telson to chelicerae I believe. I know it doesn't sound very impressive but they are great species to work with and more than big enough to enjoy!
 
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