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Something very different and unique from Peru

Discussion in 'Tarantula Chat' started by josh_r, Mar 5, 2014.

  1. sdsnybny

    sdsnybny Arachnogeek Arachnosupporter

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    Thanks Josh,
    Hope it gets moving soon for you guys, I would love to see videos and more pics.

     
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  2. AphonopelmaTX

    AphonopelmaTX Moderator Staff Member

    Looks like these spiders could be members of the newly described theraphosine genus Bistriopelma from a high altitude environment of the Andes Mountains of Peru.

    Kaderka, Radan. "Bistriopelma, un género nuevo con dos nuevas especies de Perú (Araneae: Theraphosidae: Theraphosinae)." Revista Peruana de Biología 22.3 (2015): 275-288.

    Download article in English...

    http://revistasinvestigacion.unmsm.edu.pe/index.php/rpb/article/view/11432/10256
     
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  3. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer


    Certainly resemble each other w/those red patches down the dorsal sides. Though this specimen seems to be less black, rather colored up with some silver/grey and the red flames not as intense, or maybe that's natural variation.

    How'd you find this article??
     
  4. AphonopelmaTX

    AphonopelmaTX Moderator Staff Member

    I didn't say that the spiders pictured in this thread were the species described in the paper; just that they could be of the new genus. None of the pictures in this thread display any of the generic characters for the new genus Bistriopelma other than the dorsolateral urticating hair patches on the abdomen and the locality/ distribution.

    To find new scientific papers on the Theraphosidae, I use Google Scholar (scholar.google.com) in combination with worldcat.org. For Google Scholar, I search the keyword "theraphosidae", uncheck "include patents", and at the search results screen I then select "Since 2015" (or whatever the current year is) then "Sort by date." That pulls up all recent articles and sorts them by newest to oldest. I also have the Google Scholar browser plug-in installed in my browser to look up citations I come across while browsing various web sites that include bibliographies and maintain a saved list of citations from bibliographies from articles and books I've read. The best research tool is to follow and read the articles listed in the bibliographies of research papers that interest you. None of these methods will actually "get" you the article you are looking for every time though.
     
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  5. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

    I never you did hah. Ah yes Google Scholar I forget about that one at times. Yeah I turn off patents too! I do the same with lit cited sections, esp for review articles where lit cited sections can easily top 100 and range to over 200 at times.
     
  6. josh_r

    josh_r Arachnoprince Old Timer

    Ahhhh, Radan finally got his paper published! I am very happy to see this! The spider pictured in the article as Bistriopelma lamasi are the same as the second batch of photos I posted, the more brownish and gold spiders. the jet black ones are of a different species within the same genus. It doesn't look like radan has described the black one yet. From what he told me, he lacks enough material to be able to describe them. So, there may be at least 2 to 3 more species within this genus as I know of 3 different populations that are separated by 50 to 100 kilometers.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2016
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  7. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer


    Thanks for this. I only wish E. sp Red and E sp Yellow would be characterized considering they have been in the hobby long before this new species.

    How is the paper/research coming along on this locality here https://www.facebook.com/muddyboots...4090155988541/674097092654514/?type=3&theater
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2016
  8. viper69

    viper69 ArachnoGod Old Timer

    What's interesting is this species was found 40 years ago.

    Here's a mating video
     
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