Something to prevent climbing glass?

Ophidio

Arachnopeon
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May 21, 2007
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I just got a 3 yrd old Lasiodora parahybana. Now, for some reason :? I thought these could not climb glass, but they can! I have her in this display tank, which I'd like to keep her in....



.....but I'm afraid she'll climb the glass front and fall. Is there anything I could put on the glass that would stop her from climbing up it? Someone suggested clear packing tape, would that work? Or will I have to move her to a smaller tank?
So far she has stayed in the same spot, right at the front by the hide and seems content. Temp is around 83f and humidity 80-90%. She climbed the glass when i first put her in, about 2" up, but went back down not long after.
 

jr47

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most just raise the soil level so there isnt as much open space. or you could put something in the tank she can climb safely. i put a rosea sling 1.5 inches in a ten gallon and put a 3 inch board across the back of the tank. like a ramp that goes up to the screen top. she uses that when shes climbing and so far ive not seen her on the glass.
she actually spends about half her time hanging out on it.
 

dalejamin

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Feb 13, 2007
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Yeah, raising the soil level would be the easiest way. I like the cardboard idea. My little E. campestratus started scaling the wall one nite and freaked me out. She slipped a couple times, but no harm was done. I haven't seen her do it since. Right now, she's at three inches, and I keep her in a ten gallon tank. I thought it might be alittle big at first, but she stays relatively active and uses most of the space. There's a ratio for the clearance, but I can't remeber it right offhand. I'll have to check my books. Anyone else know?
 
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Cirith Ungol

Ministry of Fluffy Bunnies
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Unless it's a mature male I'm sure the T is only a bit stressed at the moment because of the new surroundings. Having a hide and water dish should be enough for that T and besides my mature male I havn't seen any of my other parahybanas climb other than once a year and when I see that happend I raise the humidity in the tank so that they get a bit better grip and then I mind my own business again. ;)
 

Pennywise

Arachnolord
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I heard Teflon is the only thing they can't climb but I don't know how to
coat the inside of the glass. Maybe clear film of some type. Probably
the previous posts present simpler and more logical solutions.
 

omni

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I have glass, plexiglas, lexan, polystyrene, and polyethylene plastic(PET) containers, and wondered about what would be good... the plastics deterred climibing the best it seems, but eventually the T's web the sides and can climb anything if they are in there long enough.
 

Crono

Arachnobaron
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If you cut off its legs it would not climb the glass, but then you would have an even more boring spider.
 

moose35

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^^^^^^^^lol....i was thinking socks. would render the footsies
useless.
 

ballpython2

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I just got a 3 yrd old Lasiodora parahybana. Now, for some reason :? I thought these could not climb glass, but they can! I have her in this display tank, which I'd like to keep her in....



.....but I'm afraid she'll climb the glass front and fall. Is there anything I could put on the glass that would stop her from climbing up it? Someone suggested clear packing tape, would that work? Or will I have to move her to a smaller tank?
So far she has stayed in the same spot, right at the front by the hide and seems content. Temp is around 83f and humidity 80-90%. She climbed the glass when i first put her in, about 2" up, but went back down not long after.

I see you have one of those red lights in the tank how did you get it in there without the T being able to get close to it? does the T ever get close to it? even if it didnt get close to it if it stays under the light for a long time won't that fry the spider?...or is there no light at all and I'm just seeing stuff?
 

Ophidio

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May 21, 2007
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^there is a red light on top of the tank, not in it. the lid is part glass and part ventilated plastic, the light sits over the glass. not very hot, just raises the temp to around 80-85f. the only way she could get near it is if she climbed upside down on the glass...

...I might just put her in the 10 gallon I have and relax. Maybe get some Poecilotheria for that tank :cool:
She is adventuring tonight, and has climbed up that log but she's going reeeeallll slow and seems very sure footed. If she settles down where I want her to maybe I will keep her in there....hmmmm

oh I should mention, that tank is about 18" tall and there is 12" between substrate and top. What would a safe distance be?
 

lizmotobike

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i believe the safest distance depends on the leg spand. 3 years is just a time frame and not a size referance. the heavier the body mass the more damage done in a fall as well. i would not try packing tape. if you raise the dirt level you can add preformed tunnels to take the place of the plants, or let her choose whether to dig or not.
 

Mushroom Spore

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oh I should mention, that tank is about 18" tall and there is 12" between substrate and top. What would a safe distance be?
Safe distance = the legspan of the spider. 1.5x if you're feeling frisky, or dealing with a fast-growing species. That tank's probably just plain too big, you may as well go to something smaller.

Also, that's pretty hot. 85F is about absolutely the HOTTEST a tarantula should be expected to tolerate. Unless your house is below 65F, ditch that light. It's more a hazard than anything that will actually benefit your bug.
 

Alice

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my opinion as well - it's too hot. maybe that is one reason she's up and about so much.

1.5 legspan of the t should be safe as hight, but i never had anything that prevented a t from climbing the glass. even the most heavy terrestrials can do it if they feel like it, though they often slip a lot.
 

phil jones

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i keep my ones at 75/80/ and they seem ok and you will never stop a ( T ) from going for a climb if they want to < . . >phil
 

Gesticulator

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Although your set up is attractive, IMO its a bit busy for the spider. All it needs is substrate,a hide and a water dish. To me it seems the T has no where else to go but up the sides. Try simplifying the set up a bit and see what happens.
 

JMoran1097

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Safe distance = the legspan of the spider. 1.5x if you're feeling frisky, or dealing with a fast-growing species. That tank's probably just plain too big, you may as well go to something smaller.

Also, that's pretty hot. 85F is about absolutely the HOTTEST a tarantula should be expected to tolerate. Unless your house is below 65F, ditch that light. It's more a hazard than anything that will actually benefit your bug.
agreed. plus i noticed the water dish is pretty much underneath the heat lamp. T's aren't going to drink hot water.
 

Ophidio

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May 21, 2007
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Well, I moved her into a 10g tank with no extra heating, the temp now is only in the low 70s though is that really ok? What I've read has told me Lasiodora are an equatorial species therefore like it warm. Anyway here's her new home. I built up the base substrate with a sand/soil mix, then put a few inches of eco-earth/sphagnum moss mix. I read that this species isn't really inclined to burrow, but if she does will the sand bother her?



oh and here she is
 

pinkfoot

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I'd consider ditching the light, as the T might well be headed up towards it, regardless of how hot she gets. Spiders don't have to be kept warm and cosy, and excessive heat will serve to dessicate what is a more moist dwelling tarantula.

I don't believe you have mentioned the substrate? Soil, peat, and some mixes are fine, but very often a T will climb to escape the substrate, so consider this too.

Regarding surface to lid distances: This is really simple. If the T can reach the lid from the substrate, there is no way she can be hurt in a fall. If this is not desirous, then consider the spider's size. Big size = big risk from a fall, and the converse applies to spiderlings, who are must hardier. You decide the safe gap. :?

Good luck! ;)

OK I took too long to post this and you've already acted!

Seems a lot better for the spid, but several of mine are serious burrowers, so you might be surprised one morning!

I see she's still on the glass, but there seems to be no sharp objects to fall onto and your levels are fine. Does she have a hide, BTW? Very important if she's not excavating...
 
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Ophidio

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May 21, 2007
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The hide is blocked by a pothos leaf in the pic, but it's there, just a curved piece of bark partially burried to make a cave. I don't think she has found it yet, she is still on the glass this morning. I took that pic right after I put her in the tank yesterday, and it seems since then she has done one very slow lap of the tank about an inch up the glass. Hopefully she will come down and find her hide soon. The substrate, at least the top layer, is the same she had with her previous owner (eco-earth/sphagnum mix) so that shouldn't be bothering her. Maybe she's waiting for it to try out a little more?
 
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