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Solifugae sluggish with eggs

Discussion in 'Other Spiders & Arachnids' started by mantisfan101, Nov 13, 2019.

  1. mantisfan101

    mantisfan101 Arachnoangel Active Member

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    What does a gravid solifugae behave like? I can see what might be eggs on the belly of my paragaleodes but she’s acting really sluggish and is in this scrunched up position, almost like a stressed out T. I tried nudging her and she had barely any response; I tried picking her up and she was basically limp, and still remained in that scrunched up position. Can someone assure me as to what’s happening? Do gravid solifuage normally slow down and act really sluggish/limp, or is she going to die? I have her in a 2 oz deli cup with some dry sand.
     
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  2. mantisfan101

    mantisfan101 Arachnoangel Active Member

    Bump, @Smokehound714 csn you help? I saw that my other female has these same looking things in her abdomen as well.
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2019
  3. Tuisto

    Tuisto Arachnosquire

    AR
    Can you provide a picture of what you see on their underside?
     
  4. mantisfan101

    mantisfan101 Arachnoangel Active Member

  5. mantisfan101

    mantisfan101 Arachnoangel Active Member

    Bump, now my other female has eggs but isn’t as fat.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2019
  6. wizentrop

    wizentrop to the rescue! Old Timer

  7. mantisfan101

    mantisfan101 Arachnoangel Active Member

    Thanks for the pic and yeah, I heard that sometimes the intestines can press up against the outside of their bodies and this is what I’m probably seeing. However, I’ve seen some solifuges and amblypygids with this similar appearance and they produced eggs/young; is it possible that these are just underdeveloped eggs?
     
  8. wizentrop

    wizentrop to the rescue! Old Timer

    hmm... I have to say I don't think so. You see, this is a bit too many eggs. 70-80 eggs would already be considered a lot for a solifugid, and here we see many many particles. The color is also important.
    With Amblypygi, on the other hand - yes. Any spheres that you see reflecting through the female's underside would be eggs, but even non-mated females show this. It's a good tool for sexing purposes, but it doesn't mean they are gravid.
     
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