Solids 'n Liquids

Transylvania

Zookeeper/Trainer
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 26, 2006
Messages
594
I've heard people say that to test if your T is hungry or not you should flick some water droplets on the ground near it and see if it attacks the water, but my A.geniculata doesn't attack water droplets at all. I know it's not completely necessary to test to see if a T is hungry, especially not with a genic. :p But I tried a little experiment a few weeks ago and it went like so...

Me: *Drops water droplets on ground*
Mary-Jane: =B...
Me: ...*Dangles loose string*
Mary-Jane: *Attacks string* =B
Me: :eek: ...*Slowly pulls string up*
Mary-Jane: *Holds on tighter and tries to eat string* =B

My question is, can tarantulas distinguish between solids and liquids hitting the ground? I would've expected it to be the same. I usually hear of most genics lunging at the water dish as it's being refilled. Oh well, I shouldn't be complaining I guess, but it'd sure make tank maintenance more interesting. Genics must be connoisseurs at distinguishing whether something's real solid food or not. Little porkers. :rolleyes:
 

P. Novak

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Sep 12, 2005
Messages
6,234
I'm pretty sure Ts can tell the difference, but by how much I don't know. I know they can tell the difference because when I throw a cricket in to feed they pounce when I put my forceps or finger(for docile ones only) they run away. The setae(sp?) on their bodies is very sensitive, so I wouldn't be surprised if they could tell the difference.

I have never done the water droplet thing, because I find it pointless. I wait a week or two, depending on species and size of T, and then toss in a cricket. If they don't take it within an hour, I take it out and try again in a couple of days.
 
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Transylvania

Zookeeper/Trainer
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 26, 2006
Messages
594
I'm pretty sure Ts can tell the difference, but by how much I don't know. I know they can tell the difference because when I throw a cricket in to feed they pounce when I put my forceps or finger(for docile ones only) they run away. The setae(sp?) on their bodies is very sensitive, so I wouldn't be surprised if they could tell the difference.

I have never done the water droplet thing, because I find it pointless. I wake a week or two, depending on species and size of T, and then toss in a cricket. If they don't take it within an hour, I take it out and try again in a couple of days.
Oh yes I was wondering about that forceps/finger thing with dociles too. Should've suspected that. Thanks!
 

Moltar

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Apr 11, 2007
Messages
5,450
I only have terrestrials but I just wait until the spider starts acting hungry. Generally they'll be sitting at the mouth of the hide with two toes sticking out. If they hang out in the open look at their feet. I know this sounds weird but since tarantulas basically "hear" with their feet, wait until it looks like they're "listening" to the ground. Also pay attention to their posture. Front legs symmetrically splayed out, looking alert but still: they're waiting for food to walk by. When i see this behavior i'll drop a crick right in front of them. 9 out of 10 times that cricket doesn't even know what hit it.

This is just what i've figured from my own experience. It works on all 8 of my new world terrestrials except the C. fasciatum. He's a mature male w/ no date so it doesn't seem like he's thinking about food anyway.
 

IdahoBiteyThing

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 2, 2007
Messages
599
water

I have two T's I like using the water trick on, here's why. One, G. aureostriata, is currently webbed in it's hide except for a very small opening under one edge. I have to put the meal right at the opening, or hope that the meal wanders in on it's own accord (unlikely). Since I feed this one roaches, if it's not hungry, I've either pre-killed a roach for nothing (hate to waste them (I don't have many big ones yet) or I have to dig the roach out later after it burrows. So, I do a drop, I see feet, I feed. In goes roach, crunch, mission accomplished. No feet, no feed. The other, P. scrofa is very hit or miss when it comes to eating, hasn't really developed a predictable schedule, and pretty much lives in her burrow (never rests at entrance). She also gets totally stressed if she's not hungry and there's any prey item in her tank. So again, I do a drop, if she comes up out of the burrow, she gets a crunchy (she's doing mealworms and small roaches). Otherwise, she can hang in her burrow and not stress about some bug wandering around. Everybody else is pretty predictable (the post about the stance and feet is dead on), and the little slings all get pre-killed so if they don't eat, no big deal, out comes the grub and they'll get another chance in a couple days.
 
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