Smoking in my house

Mr. Tinkletoes

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 16, 2010
Messages
7
I've taken home in a small house beside my fathers which was originally used as a guest house. There is often smoke in the air and I understand that this could be harmful to any tarantula. The problem is that none of the windows have screens on them and are very close to the ground, leading to a large number of insects coming into my home.

I could of course set up traps at the windows but I don't think it would get rid of every flying insect. I'm sorry if this sounds selfish but I do live out in a small town, with A LOT of trees and A LOT of bugs. I'm not a fan of having 50 moths in my house and a ton of crawlers scittering across my floors.

Another problem is my bedroom does not have a door. For the time being I have set it by the door in hopes of getting a better chance at fresh air even though the outside door has no ventilation other than the cracks in the sides.

The windows are very old style and to open them you have to lift them up. I could put in screens but I don't think it would be too easy. Would it be okay to once and awhile put my T outside for fresh air or would it be harmful with all the insects and floating particles from all the plants?

The house isn't very large, you walk in and its the living room/kitchen and then a bathroom and bedroom.

Another question is, since I can't open windows and whatnot especially at night, it gets pretty warm and I don't want my little guy to get dehydrated. How often should I mist and where should I mist in the tank?
 

Scoolman

Arachnolord
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 9, 2010
Messages
613
I have heard and read cigarette smoke is very bad for tarantulas. They make a temporary screen you can just slide into the window and close the window down on it to hold it in place. If you are the smoker, now would be a great time to quit, eh? You have a choice to make, a few bugs in the house, or a dead tarantula.
Moisture depends on the species. I prefer to add water to one corner allowing it to soak the lower layers of sub. As is rises and evaporates it creates just enough humidity.
 

Terry D

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 21, 2009
Messages
733
Mr Tinkletoes, First off and no offense but that's a funny username {D{D

My t's have actually helped me in the direction of quitting so as not to possibly poison them with nicotine. I still smoke but only in the bathroom or outside. It's been 30+ years and although I'm still in fairly good shape, I'm tired of it.

On the bugs inside. Unless you keep the ac running, screens on windows and otherwise tight as a drum- it happens.

I don't know about possibility of parasitic flies and/or predaceous insects in your neck of the woods but I would assume it would be okay to briefly put a well sealed/screened enclosure outdoor for a short period of time providing it's preferably over 65 degrees.

Lastly, depending upon the age and species of the t and whether or not it prefers moist or dry substrate would have to be answered. Small slings in smallish containers do fairly well with 2-3 good mistings a week, depending. Always mist away from the T. Larger specimens and enclosures need a full water dish at all times. I usually pour water along the glass on water dish end of enclosure to keep the sub below radiating moisture on that end. Hope this helps some. Good luck with your little friend :):)

Terry
 

Mr. Tinkletoes

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 16, 2010
Messages
7
Thats another problem.. No AC. -_-
Sorry for kind of straying off topic but I'd like to use this as a chance to make sure everything is running smoothly.
I also understand that they do not like well-lit areas so I've been keeping him in the dark as much as possible. He first took a run to the top corner of the tank where he stayed, eventually he ran under a small plant and made a few little webbings under his feet and as of this morning he moved to the side of the tank where there is more little webbings under his feet. I'm not sure if it is actually a male so sorry for addressing it as a "he". I poked his behind a couple of times to check on him and he stills moved his legs, but not in a shocked manner, just to move a little. His legs are still very much spread out so I'm guessing he's doing okay. I'll post pictures as soon as I can. He is a fair size, probably about the size of my palm (I'm your average 18 year old boy if you can guess the size of my palm from that)

Oh and by the way, I washed my poking finger beforehand. (keep your minds out of the gutter lol.)
 

Scoolman

Arachnolord
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 9, 2010
Messages
613
They don't don't have to kept in the dark. they do need to be able to have day and night cylces. The light that filters into a room during the day is fine. They just don't need any special lighting pointed directly at them.
It may not have moved when you poked it because it did not feel threatened, it is comfortable in its suroundings.
 

Mr. Tinkletoes

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 16, 2010
Messages
7
I think you are right. I might just be overreacting cause I want to raise this one properly and not end up with a sick one just days after I bought it. He has since turned upside down, facing the ground but still on the side of the tank. Still there is not any webs to cover himself, just the ones under his feet. This may be due to lack of foliage or places to hide? He's currently above this sort of plastic bushy looking foliage. There is a small cave and tall leaves on the opposite side.

Should I try to find some bark?

Also, I opened the front door wide open this morning to let in some fresh air. Thank-you for the day and night cycle tip, I probably would of ended up putting him in the darkest place.
 

ametan

Arachnoknight
Joined
Feb 27, 2010
Messages
186
I think you are right. I might just be overreacting cause I want to raise this one properly and not end up with a sick one just days after I bought it. He has since turned upside down, facing the ground but still on the side of the tank. Still there is not any webs to cover himself, just the ones under his feet. This may be due to lack of foliage or places to hide? He's currently above this sort of plastic bushy looking foliage. There is a small cave and tall leaves on the opposite side.

Should I try to find some bark?

Also, I opened the front door wide open this morning to let in some fresh air. Thank-you for the day and night cycle tip, I probably would of ended up putting him in the darkest place.
What is your T? Maybe you've answered and I can't seem to find it, but this info makes us able to answer your questions.
 

Mr. Tinkletoes

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 16, 2010
Messages
7
Metallic Pink Toe. Atleast thats what the guy at Petland said, but they're kind of slow and will never seem to give you a straight answer.
 

ametan

Arachnoknight
Joined
Feb 27, 2010
Messages
186
Metallic Pink Toe. Atleast thats what the guy at Petland said, but they're kind of slow and will never seem to give you a straight answer.
If you can post some pictures using photobucket, etc, someone here might be able to help you be more confident in what you have.

I think you are right. I might just be overreacting cause I want to raise this one properly and not end up with a sick one just days after I bought it. He has since turned upside down, facing the ground but still on the side of the tank. Still there is not any webs to cover himself, just the ones under his feet. This may be due to lack of foliage or places to hide? He's currently above this sort of plastic bushy looking foliage. There is a small cave and tall leaves on the opposite side.

Should I try to find some bark?

Also, I opened the front door wide open this morning to let in some fresh air. Thank-you for the day and night cycle tip, I probably would of ended up putting him in the darkest place.

S/he, being an Avicularia, will probably not need a cave/hide as they are arboreal and not terrestrial. They like hanging out in greenery and on the walls of their enclosures. I'm not sure what you have your T in, but something taller than it is long is best for arboreals. They like being able to climb, not walk. An inch and a half of substrate should do and this should be moist (not wet and swampy). Make sure the enclosure is well-ventilated (lots of holes/screen/etc. so that there is a decent amount of humidity, but not too stifling as to encourage mold growth. Cork bark is good because it doesn't mold as easily in the humid environment these guys like, but not absolutely necessary. My larger Avicularia have cork bark in their enclosures, but my slings have stems of fake plants for climbing.

My slings (spiderlings) over 1", juveniles, and sub-adults/adults have deep waterbowls so they can adequately hydrate. With the smaller slings, I mist the sides of their enclosures for hydration as they and their enclosures are so small, water dishes are simply not feasible.

Also, you said only "bark" so I have to mention that with anything collected wild you run the risk of it carrying parasites or mites or who knows what into the enclosure with it. Some people recommend baking whatever you add to your Ts enclosure.

Get educated by reading all of the sticky topics at the top of every subforum on the board. They contain a wealth of knowledge and should not be overlooked. The articles section has some great things as well. Also, try to get ahold of the Tarantula Keeper's Guide. I'm only 3/4 of the way through it myself, but it has proved quite informative.
 

nesok

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jul 19, 2010
Messages
28
You may want to go to Home Depot, Lowe's, or whatever home improvement store you have near you and buy a window screen kit, or two. They're pretty cheap, EASY to build (all you need is a hacksaw, $2.00 screen roller, measuring tape, and 10 or 15 minutes), and will allow you to open up some windows without getting eaten by mosquitoes.

In the very least, it'll buy you some time while you cutback on the smokes. :D
 
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