Smaller centipedes

Tuffz

Arachnoknight
Joined
Dec 13, 2015
Messages
263
I have been looking more and more into centipedes recently. They scare me but there is something on them that makes me want to keep them. The main problem i see is their size (at least of the species that are generally kept in the hobby).

So i was wondering if there are any smaller species (5cm-10cm-ish) that are easily obtainable.
A few months back i saw a quite large one (10cmish) on a wall and ever since i regret not capturing it (no idea what sp. it was. But it was found in central Slovenia)
 

Christianb96

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 7, 2017
Messages
284
centipedes can be intimidating at first. I don't know of any centipedes that small ( other then the house centipede) but you could always find a juvenile centipede and watch it grow, that might help you get comfortable with the size. A good starter centipede that Dosent get to big is the S. Polymorpha (mine right now is Aprox 3 inches, and I think they top out at 5-6in)
 

Tuffz

Arachnoknight
Joined
Dec 13, 2015
Messages
263
centipedes can be intimidating at first. I don't know of any centipedes that small ( other then the house centipede) but you could always find a juvenile centipede and watch it grow, that might help you get comfortable with the size. A good starter centipede that Dosent get to big is the S. Polymorpha (mine right now is Aprox 3 inches, and I think they top out at 5-6in)
Yeah i have seen my behavior towards them change. Went from fear and disgust to an admiration (kind of like it happened with spiders all those years back) but the house centipedes are still horrible to me with their long legs and super speed..
Hmm maybe some european species stay smaller? I have never seen any huge ones here :p That one was the largest i have ever seen here (and it was a scolopendra. I think, certainly looked like one color/body wise)
I can probaly get a Scolopendra subspinipes pedeling but that ones seems to get quite large
 

Venom1080

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Sep 24, 2015
Messages
4,584
i dont think Ethmostigmus trigonopodus get anymore than like 5".
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,689
I suggest S.cingulata, amazing colors, a less potent venom compared to the NW & African/Asian/Oceania counterparts (but mind, still more potent than the average NW Theraphosidae), easy to care.

Problem: I've never saw one available in the online (and not) trade here, but it's normal, being a native species mostly of Southern Italy and other Mediterranean nations (Greece, Libya etc) here in Italy no one will pay for one, we just WC :-s
 

Christianb96

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jan 7, 2017
Messages
284
Yeah i have seen my behavior towards them change. Went from fear and disgust to an admiration (kind of like it happened with spiders all those years back) but the house centipedes are still horrible to me with their long legs and super speed..
Hmm maybe some european species stay smaller? I have never seen any huge ones here :p That one was the largest i have ever seen here (and it was a scolopendra. I think, certainly looked like one color/body wise)
I can probaly get a Scolopendra subspinipes pedeling but that ones seems to get quite large
I really wouldn't worry to much about there size. But a peddling would be a good start. most people collect larger centipedes
 

Telsaro

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 20, 2017
Messages
37
Yeah i have seen my behavior towards them change. Went from fear and disgust to an admiration (kind of like it happened with spiders all those years back) but the house centipedes are still horrible to me with their long legs and super speed..
Hmm maybe some european species stay smaller? I have never seen any huge ones here :p That one was the largest i have ever seen here (and it was a scolopendra. I think, certainly looked like one color/body wise)
I can probaly get a Scolopendra subspinipes pedeling but that ones seems to get quite large
My Scolopendra subspinipes is 7in right now if that gives you an idea of how big they get. I know they can get 8-9in full grown.
 

Tuffz

Arachnoknight
Joined
Dec 13, 2015
Messages
263
I suggest S.cingulata, amazing colors, a less potent venom compared to the NW & African/Asian/Oceania counterparts (but mind, still more potent than the average NW Theraphosidae), easy to care.

Problem: I've never saw one available in the online (and not) trade here, but it's normal, being a native species mostly of Southern Italy and other Mediterranean nations (Greece, Libya etc) here in Italy no one will pay for one, we just WC :-s
Yeah it sucks :/ can't find much of them around here either (especially now that it's cold and shipping them would kill them)

Can you find them in lombardy too? Or are they just a southern sp.?
 

Tuffz

Arachnoknight
Joined
Dec 13, 2015
Messages
263
I really wouldn't worry to much about there size. But a peddling would be a good start. most people collect larger centipedes
Honestly i have no idea how fast they grow. If it's not too fast it wouldn't be a problem most likely.

How big are the pedelings usually tho? I was offered some that were kept in pill bottles so like under an inch of body lenght (no idea what sp., again)
 

Tuffz

Arachnoknight
Joined
Dec 13, 2015
Messages
263
lol than you best start in the garden. ;) Scolopendra arent called giant centipedes for nothing.
Exactly :p If i can find another one like that one i saw a few months back i would be the happiest man alive :p (starting to think it wasn't a scolopendra. Who knows)
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,689
Anyway there's a thing to say when centipedes are concerned. This is my opinion, of course, but I don't think I'm too much wrong saying this. The lowest common denominator is the venom potency, and that's all.

Let's not consider the colors, the size, and everything else for a moment. Every centipede is: fast, defensive, and a (truly) escape master. This is a rule for every centipede no matter.

But, unlike for T's, where obviously the attitude is different (example, a lazy & lovely 'Grammo/Brachy' in general behavior VS, in general again, the 'OBT' one, where the first will "meh" if someone doesn't exagerate, while the latter will start a threat pose & attack for nothing) with centipedes everything is different. I have a S.subpinipes, a female, and while she's a brutal predator when hungry, she isn't too much defensive when I have to work with her. If someone doesn't bother or mess with her, obviously... well, no issues, no matter how much I clean with tongs etc

I remember that when she was gravid, for a check I.D (I wasn't aware she was a "she" and gravid, back then btw) I've taken out the cork bark for spot her... well, nothing, she remained calm. Try this with a P.muticus ;-)

I don't know how to proper explain... those animals are extremely intelligents, like if they know and are aware of.

Therefore my point is that when choosing a centipede is the venom potency the only thing someone should consider, even if bites are rare as well. I don't think their attitude differs too much from specie to specie like for T's.
 

Tuffz

Arachnoknight
Joined
Dec 13, 2015
Messages
263
Anyway there's a thing to say when centipedes are concerned. This is my opinion, of course, but I don't think I'm too much wrong saying this. The lowest common denominator is the venom potency, and that's all.

Let's not consider the colors, the size, and everything else for a moment. Every centipede is: fast, defensive, and a (truly) escape master. This is a rule for every centipede no matter.

But, unlike for T's, where obviously the attitude is different (example, a lazy & lovely 'Grammo/Brachy' in general behavior VS, in general again, the 'OBT' one, where the first will "meh" if someone doesn't exagerate, while the latter will start a threat pose & attack for nothing) with centipedes everything is different. I have a S.subpinipes, a female, and while she's a brutal predator when hungry, she isn't too much defensive when I have to work with her. If someone doesn't bother or mess with her, obviously... well, no issues, no matter how much I clean with tongs etc

I remember that when she was gravid, for a check I.D (I wasn't aware she was a "she" and gravid, back then btw) I've taken out the cork bark for spot her... well, nothing, she remained calm. Try this with a P.muticus ;-)

I don't know how to proper explain... those animals are extremely intelligents, like if they know and are aware of.
Yeah i have heared. They seem way too inteligent for a invertebrate. I talked with someone at an expo here in slovenia and he said that his pede stopped taking live food when he started offering pre-killed prey as if she knew she can get pre kill
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,689
Yeah it sucks :/ can't find much of them around here either (especially now that it's cold and shipping them would kill them)

Can you find them in lombardy too? Or are they just a southern sp.?
Wish that :-s

But here it's too cold (even if those days seems that Italy turned upside down... snow in Center/South, sun in the North). S.cingulata lives in Central/Southern Italy, always easy to find under those rocks near woods etc. I know people that WC her :kiss:
 

Tuffz

Arachnoknight
Joined
Dec 13, 2015
Messages
263
Wish that :-s

But here it's too cold (even if those days seems that Italy turned upside down... snow in Center/South, sun in the North). S.cingulata lives in Central/Southern Italy, always easy to find under those rocks near woods etc. I know people that WC her :kiss:
Aparently there is also a sp. that lives in the balkans but i have no idea if it's found here :s
I'll go check
 

Tuffz

Arachnoknight
Joined
Dec 13, 2015
Messages
263
Wish that :-s

But here it's too cold (even if those days seems that Italy turned upside down... snow in Center/South, sun in the North). S.cingulata lives in Central/Southern Italy, always easy to find under those rocks near woods etc. I know people that WC her :kiss:
Apparently S. cingulata are found here :p
At the seaside. I'll go check once it gets warmer
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
Active Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2014
Messages
5,689
Apparently S. cingulata are found here :p
At the seaside. I'll go check once it gets warmer
That's great :-s

Here in Lombardy we don't have the sea nor that breeze, but maybe if someone spot in Liguria region, in those woods in summer time... who knows :angelic:
 

Telsaro

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 20, 2017
Messages
37
Anyway there's a thing to say when centipedes are concerned. This is my opinion, of course, but I don't think I'm too much wrong saying this. The lowest common denominator is the venom potency, and that's all.

Let's not consider the colors, the size, and everything else for a moment. Every centipede is: fast, defensive, and a (truly) escape master. This is a rule for every centipede no matter.

But, unlike for T's, where obviously the attitude is different (example, a lazy & lovely 'Grammo/Brachy' in general behavior VS, in general again, the 'OBT' one, where the first will "meh" if someone doesn't exagerate, while the latter will start a threat pose & attack for nothing) with centipedes everything is different. I have a S.subpinipes, a female, and while she's a brutal predator when hungry, she isn't too much defensive when I have to work with her. If someone doesn't bother or mess with her, obviously... well, no issues, no matter how much I clean with tongs etc

I remember that when she was gravid, for a check I.D (I wasn't aware she was a "she" and gravid, back then btw) I've taken out the cork bark for spot her... well, nothing, she remained calm. Try this with a P.muticus ;-)

I don't know how to proper explain... those animals are extremely intelligents, like if they know and are aware of.

Therefore my point is that when choosing a centipede is the venom potency the only thing someone should consider, even if bites are rare as well. I don't think their attitude differs too much from specie to specie like for T's.
This! A 2-3" centipede can give you just as nasty a bite as a 7-8", depending on the species and venom potency. As far as I'm aware, a pedeling has just as potent venom as an adult. If you have the proper respect for the centipede, it really shouldn't matter if you do decide to keep one of the giants.

I also have a S. subpinipes, and can confirm everything said here. I can clean the enclosure, refill the water, move the hide, ect. and it really doesn't bother her all that much. She would much rather move away from the commotion and burrow than to become aggressive and come after me. You do have to have a respect for how fast they can be, and understand how they perceive the world. Vibrations, smells, and light all play a factor into their reaction. I have witnessed my girl test pinching the water dish I put in before walking on it, so they are cautious and intelligent. They will also try to escape, so make sure you double check that your enclosure is "centipede-proof".
 
Top