Sling Feeding?

Nephrite

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Hey guys! I'm kind of confused on what to do right now. I recently have received 2 slings, C. Elegans, and Eauthlus sp. red. They are both about 1/4". I leave half of a mealworm in each container, or a cricket leg every 2 days, and take it out if it hasn't been eaten in a day. Usually they take the food, problem is that they usually take the food I provide back deep into their burrow. Which makes me unable to take it out without breaking the burrow, or making some sort of disturbance. I've heard not taking out leftover feeding items can cause mold, so what do I do?
 

cold blood

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Use mealworm 1/4ths, not halves, that leaves too much potentially uneaten food.

Sling boli are generally tiny and not much concern as you will probably re-house before it becomes an issue.
 

Mauri

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Whats up with not using livefood? With terrestrials it's pretty simple. Put in one 2nd instar cricket or smaller than the T. Put on lid check back in a few hrs. (and thats unusal..only my Smithi/Pulchra seems a shy/problematic eater. Rest take a cricket within seconds so generally I know and who/when has eaten what)

I only use pre-killed if I think they are in pre-moult.

p.s 1-2 crickets per week for my slings has been working fine. And generally my slings leave the remains away from their hides/burrows. So far have removed only tiny boluses and verr rarely. As cold blood said wouldnt be 2 worried about it. Check though regularly.
 
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Nephrite

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Whats up with not using livefood? With terrestrials it's pretty simple. Put in one 2nd instar cricket or smaller than the T. Put on lid check back in a few hrs. (and thats unusal..only my Smithi/Pulchra seems a shy/problematic eater. Rest take a cricket within seconds so generally I know and who/when has eaten what)

I only use pre-killed if I think they are in pre-moult.

p.s 1-2 crickets per week for my slings has been working fine. And generally my slings leave the remains away from their hides/burrows. So far have removed only tiny boluses and verr rarely. As cold blood said wouldnt be 2 worried about it. Check though regularly.
I usually don't have access to very young crickets, and these are my first 2 slings, so I rather be safe than sorry.
 

Mauri

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I usually don't have access to very young crickets, and these are my first 2 slings, so I rather be safe than sorry.
Not sure what you mean by safe than sorry? And you cant order any online...and keep them alive for any length of time?

My tubs of 2nd instars last for a month at least (then yes I might use a few pre-killed that have gotten 2 large)...and I still have black crickets which were 2nd instars and now more like adults. :)

p.s ahh you mean the prey killing the T? Well that wont happen unless you leave a live one in with a moulting T but thats all about learning the currect husbandry..

By all means am not saying dont do what you are doing but it's a bit over the top. Also it helps to learn this stuff for the future.

It's common sense. If your slings have bottom parts larger than the top it's quite possibly they wont eat live food. (and generally you want smaller prey when you are starting off so you can be pretty sure they will go for it). Otherwise give them 2nd instars or similar. Most spiderlings I have got arrive around the 1cm-3cm size so 2nd instars or perhaps the micros will do. (I just about got away with very small 2nd instars for my Smithi).

Also I'd be pretty bored to not see my T's catch their food.
 
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magicmed

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Not sure what you mean by safe than sorry? And you cant order any online...and keep them alive for any length of time?

My tubs of 2nd instars last for a month at least (then yes I might use a few pre-killed that have gotten 2 large)...and I still have black crickets which were 2nd instars and now more like adults. :)

p.s ahh you mean the prey killing the T? Well that wont happend unless you leave a live one in with a moulting T but all about learning the currect husbandry..

By all means am not saying dont do what you are doing but it's a bit over the top. Also it helps to learn this stuff for the future.
I'm sure what OP means by being safe is not wanting a larger cricket to kick one of the slings, possibly causing a puncture. Especially when Euathlus sp red is concerned, it's suggested offering even smaller pray than one normally would with a sling of the same size but different species.

I've actually heard a couple people on the forums recommend feeding prekilled to small slings, my 1cm hapolopus sp columbia seem quite content with their cricket legs and prekilled smalls.

Ordering large amounts of pinheads would be a little silly when you only have a couple spiders, they won't stay pinheads forever, and purchasing 10 or 20 at a time usually either isn't an option, or builds up on shipping cost. Order too many and the crickets outgrow the spiders
 

Mauri

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I'm sure what OP means by being safe is not wanting a larger cricket to kick one of the slings, possibly causing a puncture. Especially when Euathlus sp red is concerned, it's suggested offering even smaller pray than one normally would with a sling of the same size but different species.

I've actually heard a couple people on the forums recommend feeding prekilled to small slings, my 1cm hapolopus sp columbia seem quite content with their cricket legs and prekilled smalls.

Ordering large amounts of pinheads would be a little silly when you only have a couple spiders, they won't stay pinheads forever, and purchasing 10 or 20 at a time usually either isn't an option, or builds up on shipping cost. Order too many and the crickets outgrow the spiders
Well am sure no-one feeds larger prey to their slings (I prefer smaller). Well I started off with a couple of slings and made 2nd instars last. (I didnt need to buy more for at least a month or so).

I keep my prey alive of course in tubs which means extra work. And I dont see your point...even if you have 2 slings or more you still need to buy a tub of crickets or worms.

p.s and using pre-killed sometimes means u waste the cricket. If my crickets arent eaten they are put back to live another day.

So it's costing me atm around £3 a month if that.
 

Trenor

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Well am sure no-one feeds larger prey to their slings (I prefer smaller). Well I started off with a couple of slings and made 2nd instars last. (I didnt need to buy more for at least a month or so).

I keep my prey alive of course in tubs which means extra work. And I dont see your point...even if you have 2 slings or more you still need to buy a tub of crickets or worms.

p.s and using pre-killed sometimes means u waste the cricket. If my crickets arent eaten they are put back to live another day.

So it's costing me atm around £3 a month if that.
I know a few who feed larger prey depending on the tarantulas but normally you should feed the correct size prey to your T.

I do prekill often when I feed dubias just to keep them from burrowing.

You can put the meal worms in the refrigerator and they last a really long time compared to crickets.

With so many meal worms in a small tub, a lot will die before you can use them if you only have 2 Ts. So a wasted one or two doesn't make a big difference IMO. I feed dubias and I have so many if one or two doesn't get ate I don't even notice.

All of these options are valid for feeding. What it comes down to is how many Ts you have, what prey you have available (can get easily) and what you find easiest to work with.
 

EulersK

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Well am sure no-one feeds larger prey to their slings (I prefer smaller).
My slings get roaches at least as big as they are. At least. Pre-killed, of course. The crushed head keeps them kicking - the braver slings take them down, the skittish slings wait for it to stop kicking.

Just this morning I fed my LP sling a roach over twice it's size. I'd never do this with live prey, of course. This is all preference - so long as the slings are getting food, it really doesn't matter.
 

Mauri

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Sure the most important thing is they are being fed. Just thought it a bit strange that someone wasnt using livefood. I mean for sure if you live out in the stixx as it were....

So far I used some mealworms at the start but switched to crickets (brown n black). My current black ones have got pretty fat n juicy (currently they seem to like cucumber and I always give them plenty of Oats) so have found one per month is enough for my Juve Hentzi and my P.Irminia has been in pre-moult/moult for last 2 weeks but she had perhaps 2 med/large crickets a month usually. (again I dont think she is fully grown yet).

So so far have bought 1 tub mealworms, 2x tubs 2nd instars brown and 2x black crickets since I started 4-5 months back. Not bad. Now am up to 16 t's am sure will get through maybe one tub of 2nd instars every two months...(well that's the plan).

p.s trust me I have been trying to feed my Hentzi more but she just ignore it. Might try her though on a few small mealworms soon.
 

EulersK

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I don't use live food for slings for one reason: It allows me to give them massive meals. A sling could never take down the prey that I'm offering, and I want them to fatten up as quickly as possible. It's not uncommon at all in my collection for a sling to only get one meal in before going into premolt.
 

Mauri

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I don't use live food for slings for one reason: It allows me to give them massive meals. A sling could never take down the prey that I'm offering, and I want them to fatten up as quickly as possible. It's not uncommon at all in my collection for a sling to only get one meal in before going into premolt.
Any reason why you would want to fatten them up as quick as possible? (I read some people try and do this "powerfeeding". Sounds like some kind of World of Warcraft powerlevelling or something ha) And whether it's one meal or a few dont think it matters.

I think though the overall heat does effect the speed they grow (metabolism), and in the UK it generally cooler than you guys in the US so mine might grow slower. Am not bothered tbh. I generally offer my slings another cricket maybe 5 days after their last feed. If they refuse I leave it a day or so...

Well I got my avic amazonicas back in April (end) and since then 2 moults each so that is ok I think. (was pretty chilly for May and some of June).

and ofc those OBT's seem like fat little bloaters! I just discovered P.Cambridgei slings are pretty good eaters as well. Gonna feed a lot tomorrow!
 
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EulersK

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Any reason why you would want to fatten then up as much as possible? And whether it's one meal or a few dont think it matters.

I think though the overall heat does effect the speed they grow (metabolism), and in the UK it generally cooler than you guys in the US so mine might grow slower. Am not bothered tbh. I generally offer my slings another cricket maybe 5 days after their last feed. If they refuse I leave it a day or so...

Well I got my avic amazonicas back in April (end) and since then 2 moults each so that is ok I think. (was pretty chilly for May and some of June).

and ofc those OBT's seem like fat little bloaters! I just discovered P.Cambridgei slings are pretty good eaters as well. Gonna feed a lot tomorrow!
"Powerfeeding" is an overused term, but I'd say that I do indeed powerfeed. I want them out of that fragile (and boring) sling stage as quickly as possible. My spiders are kept in my server room - average temperature during the summer is 85F, and average in the winter is 75F. High heat, constant food. Some of my more voracious slings get two or three meals per day.

It's not the number of meals that was my point. I meant that they are able to attempt a molt much quicker. During these months, most slings average about 3 weeks between molts. I just had a B. vagans molt twice in a 37 day span. Just like last year, it looks like I won't have any slings by the end of this summer. Of course, the Brachy's are usually the exception to this.
 

Mauri

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"Powerfeeding" is an overused term, but I'd say that I do indeed powerfeed. I want them out of that fragile (and boring) sling stage as quickly as possible. My spiders are kept in my server room - average temperature during the summer is 85F, and average in the winter is 75F. High heat, constant food. Some of my more voracious slings get two or three meals per day.

It's not the number of meals that was my point. I meant that they are able to attempt a molt much quicker. During these months, most slings average about 3 weeks between molts. I just had a B. vagans molt twice in a 37 day span. Just like last year, it looks like I won't have any slings by the end of this summer. Of course, the Brachy's are usually the exception to this.
Well I quite like them in the sling stage, dont find it boring at all but then it's all new to me. I'd like them all a bit bigger before Winter. Ideally.

I'd say mine are around the month mark in between moults + or _.

My own personal feeling is that powerfeeding might be possible if your temps are that much higher. I cant do this unless my heating bill goes up! (although I dont let it go below 20c).
 

viper69

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Powerfeeding, comes from the herp hobbies that I have/continue to be a part of it.

I really don't know how anyone can use the term "powerfeeding" with Ts when there is no scientific data (correct me if wrong with citations) demonstrating the frequency and quantity that a given species eats in the wild. If there is, I'd LOVE to read it.

The very word "powerfeeding" to me implies that an owner knows the typical satiety of Ts in the wild.

Well am sure no-one feeds larger prey to their slings (I prefer smaller)
I do to certain species.

I know a few who feed larger prey depending on the tarantulas but normally you should feed the correct size prey to your T.
Agreed, see above.
 

Mauri

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Sorry I should have clarified what I meant.

I didnt mean larger as in larger and perhaps safe. I meant larger as was dangerous.

(if you look up at the start we were talking about what is "safe".)

But to be picky yes at the moment I tend to feed smaller or same size. That's not to say none of my T's havent had what I would have thought of as larger than it's size...happened with my Anax but only the once. (so yeah I know it's possible, I just dont do it because I film and I tong feed and generally it's slings so I'd prefer them to take the prey).
 

viper69

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I didnt mean larger as in larger and perhaps safe. I meant larger as was dangerous.
That makes sense! I didn't see the other part, scrolling through a lot, thanks for the tip!
 

Mauri

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That makes sense! I didn't see the other part, scrolling through a lot, thanks for the tip!
Well the Op was saying "safe then sorry" so I was just wondering why he/she would think livefood was unsafe. We all know that feeding your T's silly prey items is a risk and when it's in pre-moult etc.

I found avics can def be a bit fussy when it comes to size and my OBT seems not to care in the slightest. Well have seen it tackle larger crickets (forgot about my Babs). Also think my King bab is a bit along the lines of "bring it on". Actually thats another reason why I like babs generally you dont have to fiddle about searching for a smaller cricket.

Perhaps my Psalmos might be more feisty as well. (but just got them..slings anyways).
 
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viper69

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I found avics can def be a bit fussy when it comes to size
I've been pretty lucky there with one exception, A. sp. Kwitara River. Small prey items only, and by far the SLOWEST growing Avic ever. I have Avics that are 1/3 its age and larger than it. What I have found is size preference difference across species. Like my M. balfouri slings, they only want small little crix despite their size. Yet, my P. irminia (same size) will devour much larger items. But, my other irminia would NEVER eat something as large as this one does.
 

Mauri

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I've been pretty lucky there with one exception, A. sp. Kwitara River. Small prey items only, and by far the SLOWEST growing Avic ever. I have Avics that are 1/3 its age and larger than it. What I have found is size preference difference across species. Like my M. balfouri slings, they only want small little crix despite their size. Yet, my P. irminia (same size) will devour much larger items. But, my other irminia would NEVER eat something as large as this one does.
My amazonicas have been similar. Now have braunshesheni+versi+metallica to try as well. Although it does seem to get easier after two moults...

If you want a good feeder also try a T. Lagunas if you havent got one. You wont be disappointed. Also blue fangs so far been pretty good.

Just beware of G Pulchra! ha.

p.s yeah I was wondering whether the larger avics (amazonica etc)..like say the King bab etc grow that much slower. Isnt that Kwitara bigger than say a Versi? I guess it makes sense.

Oh Braunshesheni looks just like an Amazonica I will probably get them confused as slings.
 
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