Sling care

Ehliza

Arachnopeon
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Nov 29, 2016
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Tomorrow I will be receiving an Acanthoscurria Geniculata sling. I have everything ready, but I'm still concerned.

I've heard this species likes more humidity,but slings usually require even more. What should I do to test the humidity? How can I tell if it's humid enough? Should there be condensation or what? Any tips whatsoever are greatly appreciated, as I'm slightly paranoid. Also, does every other day food seem good for this species?
 

ledzeppelin

Arachnobaron
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Jan 8, 2013
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434
how big is the sling? You just dampen a part of the enclosure and provide a water dish - a bottle cap would do. Then just overflow the cap for a bit and repeat when the damp part of the enclosure dries out.
 

Ehliza

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Nov 29, 2016
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how big is the sling? You just dampen a part of the enclosure and provide a water dish - a bottle cap would do. Then just overflow the cap for a bit and repeat when the damp part of the enclosure dries out.
The sling is 1/2" or 1/3". Thank you:) I'm probably making a bigger deal about this than it is.
 

ledzeppelin

Arachnobaron
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Jan 8, 2013
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Oh, at that size you don't really need a water dish yet. Just moisten like 1/3 of the enclosure and repeat after it dries out. The sling at this size will recieve most of its water needs from its prey so water dish is unnecessary. I would provide one after it molts a couple of times.

Good luck :)
 

Ehliza

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Nov 29, 2016
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Oh, at that size you don't really need a water dish yet. Just moisten like 1/3 of the enclosure and repeat after it dries out. The sling at this size will recieve most of its water needs from its prey so water dish is unnecessary. I would provide one after it molts a couple of times.

Good luck :)
Thank you! I had a bottle cap in there with water but I'll take it out.
 

Venom1080

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posting a pic of the cage could help. at 1/2", a 8oz deli cup or vial will do just fine.
 

ledzeppelin

Arachnobaron
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Thank you! I had a bottle cap in there with water but I'll take it out.
Well it's not really a hazard since slings float, it's just not yet necessary.

Oh and I forgot the food. Well every other day seems fine but that depends on what you'd be feeding it. I feed mine only once to twice a week but that's just my preference.
 

viper69

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Dec 8, 2006
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Tomorrow I will be receiving an Acanthoscurria Geniculata sling. I have everything ready, but I'm still concerned.

I've heard this species likes more humidity,but slings usually require even more. What should I do to test the humidity? How can I tell if it's humid enough? Should there be condensation or what? Any tips whatsoever are greatly appreciated, as I'm slightly paranoid. Also, does every other day food seem good for this species?
Species names are lower case, not capitalized ;)

Condensation is a bad sign, that's one step away from growing the cure for cancer. You want a reasonable amount of moisture for some slings but with a decent level of ventilation. Moist stagnant air isn't good. It's something you learn over time to be honest. I pay attention to the substrate color and whether there is condensation or not.

It will do fine w/that feeding frequency, however you are best to let your T determine when it's hungry or not. They don't eat like clockwork like humans. Pay attention to the abdomen size, small/shriveled is dying/death, fat/plump is healthy and hydrated generally speaking.

Always provide a water dish.

A slings job is to eat and eat, get large to avoid predators. Feed it as often as it will eat.
 

viper69

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Here's the enclosure I have ready
https://www.google.com/search?q=tar...m&ved=0ahUKEwiT97rNn6fRAhVK7CYKHdKIDXYQnUAIGQ

Okay so the water dish thing is still controversial it seems haha but I'll put one in.
Your link shows a list of images, not a single container

Let's be clear, it's not controversial that Ts need water in addition to food. What is challenging at times is providing water if the Ts are kept in small containers. It's not controversial.

Depending on the T and size of container, you may need a syringe with a blunt tip needle. I use this along with water dishes for some of my Avics.
 

cold blood

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I would keep it in a condiment cup with damp sub and moderate ventilation, dont over ventilate or it will dry too quickly.

Dont measure humidity numbers, just add moisture as the sub dries.

Id bet it will be on the smaller end of size, this species hatches out really small....my dwarf N. Incei hatched out bigger.
 
Last edited:

Tim Benzedrine

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When I got my second A. geniculata, it was a 3/4 inch s'ling. I put it in a condiment cup with dampened substrate. I gave it a periodic SINGLE fine spritz of water on one side of the cup in case it wanted to lap up a tiny drop or two and dampened the substrate to what I considered an appropriate level. The cup had side ventilation holes as well as on the lid, and I would remove the lid daily for a quick air exchange (Except for a two week period when I was out of the country, I had to just hope that adding a tad bit more moisture before I left and the ventilation holes would see it through. It did. After it moulted once or twice, I added a lego brick as a water bowl as per somebody's suggestion here on the boards.
All of this seemed to work, it's at around three inches now.. Hmm, maybe I should take it out of the condiment cup now... ;)

It seems to be a bit more of a slow-grower than most have the reputation of being, I've noticed. I can't compare it's growth rate to the previous one because it did not start as a small s'ling, I think it was two inches when I got it.
They are pretty easy to raise, I lost my first one, but that was the result of a rather freakish moult that did traumatic damage to its abdomen. You should be fine with yours.
 
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