similarities in scientific names

Bry

Arachnodemon
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Mar 22, 2003
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773
Ever since I've been hunting for a new T, I have noticed similarities in scientific names ending with 'pelma', such as Aphnopelma, Brachypelma, Chromatopelma, Haplopelma. I've wondered what is the significance of using 'pelma'. Maybe someone with a better understanding of the Latin names can explain it for me? :?

Bry
 

Godzilla2000

Arachnoangel
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Mar 14, 2003
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Well here's the definition I was able to scour up.

pelma
n. - impression showing shape of sole.
 

Bry

Arachnodemon
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Mar 22, 2003
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Thanks...

Thanks for the help. That did help quite a bit. Didn't see a translation for Grammastola though.

Bry
 

conipto

ArachnoPrincess
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Sep 27, 2002
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As best I can find, grammastola came out in latin to mean 'long coat'.. go figure..

Bill
 

belewfripp

Arachnobaron
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Aug 17, 2002
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In general, and this applies to most of taxonomy and not just Ts, the genus name is usually Greek transliterated into the Latin alphabet and the specific epithet (the albopilosum in Brachypelma albopilosum for example) is Latin or latinized proper names (like smithi, peterklaasi, blondi). A large selection of Greek vocabulary was adopted by the Romans which means that sometimes the Greek genus name can be translated through Latin and Greek both. And sometimes the scientist making the name doesn't follow the standard, like Hysterocrates gigas, which is all Greek.


Adrian
 

dennis

Arachnodemon
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Jan 2, 2003
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You think the pelma's look alike, how about
CHromatopelma
STromatopelma


Dennis
 

ArachnoJoost

Arachnobaron
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Aug 6, 2002
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In the link Bill provided you can see that pelma means '(sole of) foot'

Some of the combinations are really nice: Poecilotheria regalis: Kingly or Regal Coloured Beast, Psalmopoeus reduncus: Bent or Curved Back Song Creator...:)
 
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