Shy tarantulas

Sana

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My question for today is in regard specifically to H. maculata but I'm sure can be answered with examples from a lot of species. Please know beforehand that I'm not worried or panicked, just curious about other people's thoughts. I'm pretty new to super shy tarantulas that hide a lot, so it's an adjustment. I'm loving my little H. macs, each about 1/2". They are making lovely intricate burrows with webbed retreats at the openings. I generally spot them somewhere about once a week, though not out in the open so that they are clearly visible. Duh, it's an H. mac, right? I've heard others with the species say that they don't see theirs, sometimes for months. The one that I didn't see at all this week has the most complex burrow of any of my tarantulas and if burrows are a measure of happiness, I'd say it's doing great. I would like to hear some experiences from others regarding your little shy ones. How long is the longest that it's been between sightings for you? What are indications that there is something to be concerned about, if any? Obviously the spider is doing spider things, which is awesome. I figure it will come out eventually form wherever in that giant burrow it has settled. Just wondering how I would tell if something was wrong, as opposed to the spider things, since you don't see them.
 

BobGrill

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I have one H.maculata that I see out fairly regularly, but my other one I am lucky if I catch a glimpse of it every few weeks. Sometimes I like to trickle a little water onto the webbing and that sometimes encourages it to come out and take a drink. I personally think Ephebopus and certain Psalmopoeus species are more reclusive than H.maculata.
 

Sana

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I have one H.maculata that I see out fairly regularly, but my other one I am lucky if I catch a glimpse of it every few weeks. Sometimes I like to trickle a little water onto the webbing and that sometimes encourages it to come out and take a drink. I personally think Ephebopus and certain Psalmopoeus species are more reclusive than H.maculata.
I like your water idea. Maybe I'll try that to catch a glimpse of my little guys. I'm always excited to see them when they peek out.
 

eldondominicano

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I like your water idea. Maybe I'll try that to catch a glimpse of my little guys. I'm always excited to see them when they peek out.
I've got four H. Macs, two that come out rather occasionally, and another two the spend the better part of the days hanging half or fully out of their burrows.

---------- Post added 02-16-2015 at 12:35 PM ----------

I have one H.maculata that I see out fairly regularly, but my other one I am lucky if I catch a glimpse of it every few weeks. Sometimes I like to trickle a little water onto the webbing and that sometimes encourages it to come out and take a drink. I personally think Ephebopus and certain Psalmopoeus species are more reclusive than H.maculata.
Interesting, my E. Cyanognathus' aren't terribly shy. They spend almost all day half out of their burrow
 

Poec54

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My shyest ones are the slings/juveniles of Cyriopagopus, Lampropelma, Heteroscodra, and Stromatopelma. If I touch their containers, they dive into their retreats. Poecs stand out as the most consistently visible of my OW arboreals.
 

eldondominicano

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My shyest ones are the slings/juveniles of Cyriopagopus, Lampropelma, Heteroscodra, and Stromatopelma. If I touch their containers, they dive into their retreats. Poecs stand out as the most consistently visible of my OW arboreals.
My Cyriopagopus and Lampropelma, juvie and adult alike, are pet holes. My H macs will stand their ground if I touch the containers, but picking the containers up causes them to retreat, understandably. Of course I only do this for maintenance and feeding.
 

klawfran3

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Feb 6, 2013
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My question for today is in regard specifically to H. maculata but I'm sure can be answered with examples from a lot of species. Please know beforehand that I'm not worried or panicked, just curious about other people's thoughts. I'm pretty new to super shy tarantulas that hide a lot, so it's an adjustment. I'm loving my little H. macs, each about 1/2". They are making lovely intricate burrows with webbed retreats at the openings. I generally spot them somewhere about once a week, though not out in the open so that they are clearly visible. Duh, it's an H. mac, right? I've heard others with the species say that they don't see theirs, sometimes for months. The one that I didn't see at all this week has the most complex burrow of any of my tarantulas and if burrows are a measure of happiness, I'd say it's doing great. I would like to hear some experiences from others regarding your little shy ones. How long is the longest that it's been between sightings for you? What are indications that there is something to be concerned about, if any? Obviously the spider is doing spider things, which is awesome. I figure it will come out eventually form wherever in that giant burrow it has settled. Just wondering how I would tell if something was wrong, as opposed to the spider things, since you don't see them.
I have a C. Fimbriatus that made a nice deep burrow. I haven't actually seen or caught a glimpse of the spider for nearly two months, but the only reason I know he is ok is because I leave prekilled food at the mouth of his burrow. If it's gone or moved, I know he's still kicking. Usually, when he's getting ready to molt, he'll shove the food away from the burrow mouth but not eat it. I'm pretty thankful for that haha. He also likes dumping his molts out of his burrow, so it makes it easy for me to know when to start feeding again.
All in all, if you learn the personality of the spider in question and what it does on a regular basis, it makes it pretty easy to know if something's wrong.

rehousing this guy, however, is going to be a nightmare.
 

Poec54

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I have a C. Fimbriatus that made a nice deep burrow. I haven't actually seen or caught a glimpse of the spider for nearly two months, but the only reason I know he is ok is because I leave prekilled food at the mouth of his burrow. If it's gone or moved, I know he's still kicking. Usually, when he's getting ready to molt, he'll shove the food away from the burrow mouth but not eat it. I'm pretty thankful for that haha. He also likes dumping his molts out of his burrow, so it makes it easy for me to know when to start feeding again.
All in all, if you learn the personality of the spider in question and what it does on a regular basis, it makes it pretty easy to know if something's wrong.

rehousing this guy, however, is going to be a nightmare.

My fimbriatus stay out in the open on their silk sheets.
 

BobGrill

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I've got four H. Macs, two that come out rather occasionally, and another two the spend the better part of the days hanging half or fully out of their burrows.

---------- Post added 02-16-2015 at 12:35 PM ----------



Interesting, my E. Cyanognathus' aren't terribly shy. They spend almost all day half out of their burrow
Same with mine. Its actually the E.murinus that is a pet hole. The blue-fang is out fairly often, although it seldom strays far from its burrow.
 

eldondominicano

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Same with mine. Its actually the E.murinus that is a pet hole. The blue-fang is out fairly often, although it seldom strays far from its burrow.
This is the same behavior mines exhibit, don't have an E. Murinus, but I hear that not gorging them does cause them to sit at the head of there burrow often, has your done this?

---------- Post added 02-16-2015 at 01:54 PM ----------

Of course that statement could go for all pet holes
 

BigHairy8's

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Very shy T's! The best way that I have found to actually see them, is to view them at night with a low intensity flash light. Use a red lense cover. This seems to not spook them as much. This doesn't work all the time but I have seen mine out mostly well after dark. As they grow older and increase in size you will be able to see them a little easier. It's a shame that that they are so secretive! The adults are very striking animals. Oh yah....be at the top of your game when you re-house these critters! Very fast! I chased one of mine around the room for an hour before I was able to finally catch her.
 

Sana

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Oct 26, 2014
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I have a C. Fimbriatus that made a nice deep burrow. I haven't actually seen or caught a glimpse of the spider for nearly two months, but the only reason I know he is ok is because I leave prekilled food at the mouth of his burrow. If it's gone or moved, I know he's still kicking. Usually, when he's getting ready to molt, he'll shove the food away from the burrow mouth but not eat it. I'm pretty thankful for that haha. He also likes dumping his molts out of his burrow, so it makes it easy for me to know when to start feeding again.
All in all, if you learn the personality of the spider in question and what it does on a regular basis, it makes it pretty easy to know if something's wrong.

rehousing this guy, however, is going to be a nightmare.
I figure that when I get to rehousing the pet holes, I'll be rereading a thread that I saw a few months ago with tips on good ways to do so. I'll probably end up asking questions at that point as well. The good news for me is that I generally house mine in slightly larger enclosures than are strictly necessary, so I don't rehouse as often. It keeps everything to a lower stress level for me and the spiders. I've got plenty of time to read up before I have to worry.

I peeked in this evening while I was checking on everyone and I caught a quick glimpse of spinnerets diving down a borrow, so at least one of the two has been sighted this week.
 

bchbum11

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I. mira are by far my most reclusive spiders. I have 2 adult females, and am lucky to have 1 sighting a year. Crickets go in and never come out, so I know they are fine. It is a bit frustrating to see them so infrequently though, because I personally think they are one of the most beautiful species out there. My P. reduncus are also fairly reclusive (shyest species in the genus in my experience), and my C fasciatum tends to disappear for 4-5 months every year whether molting or not. Just more reason to own multiple Ts I suppose. When you get enough of them one will always be out doing something.
 

Sana

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I. mira are by far my most reclusive spiders. I have 2 adult females, and am lucky to have 1 sighting a year. Crickets go in and never come out, so I know they are fine. It is a bit frustrating to see them so infrequently though, because I personally think they are one of the most beautiful species out there. My P. reduncus are also fairly reclusive (shyest species in the genus in my experience), and my C fasciatum tends to disappear for 4-5 months every year whether molting or not. Just more reason to own multiple Ts I suppose. When you get enough of them one will always be out doing something.
I'm overjoyed with my shy little H. maculatas. I've been in love with the species for a long time and no matter how often they hide, I eventually get a peek. It's a good thing that I have quite a few in my collection though, as I love to see the vastly different behaviors and personalities. And you're right, one of them is always doing something interesting.
 

eldondominicano

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I'm overjoyed with my shy little H. maculatas. I've been in love with the species for a long time and no matter how often they hide, I eventually get a peek. It's a good thing that I have quite a few in my collection though, as I love to see the vastly different behaviors and personalities. And you're right, one of them is always doing something interesting.
My H macs are awesome. Thet are very bold, and love chilling in the light oddly enough...
 

Poec54

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I'm overjoyed with my shy little H. maculatas. I've been in love with the species for a long time and no matter how often they hide, I eventually get a peek. It's a good thing that I have quite a few in my collection though, as I love to see the vastly different behaviors and personalities. And you're right, one of them is always doing something interesting.
Wait until they start to get their adult color.
 

Bark

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I have owned a bunch of H Maculatas, but I am down to 1 female that I have had going on 10 years. She is as shy today as she was as a sling. She is very pretty. At this time of year I use a space heater to warm my tarantulas. The Regalis and the Versi all move to the side of their enclosures closest to the heater. The Maculata doesn't even care to make itself warmer. So far it is my longest living and hardiest tarantula.
 
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