SHOOT ME NOW: I just crushed my baby B. emelia.

Dovey

Arachnobaron
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Apr 9, 2016
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:banghead::banghead::banghead::banghead: She isn't dead, by some miracle of physics and thick carpet, but she has lost one leg and has a broken second leg--R1 & R2, respectively. Left side seems fully functional, as do both pedipalps, thank God. I can only pray her mouth parts and internal structures were equally lucky. I don't see any hemolymph.

Damn and blast. <-----That's not foul language, it's a Shakespeare quote and appropriate in context. I really could just put a tin bucket on my head and beat on it with a metal spoon until some sense seeps in. She just came tearing out of her container and hurling through space--I tried to catch her as she fell, but she skittered right under my shoe as it came down. I'm just sick about it. She's still so tiny, smaller than my pinky fingernail. She moulted for the second time just three days ago. I should have been ready for any shenanigans she might have in mind.

Anyway, I have her in an observation container with moist paper towel. Should I remove that bent, dangling leg tomorrow--assuming she survives the night? She'll only have two on that side until her next moult (if I'm lucky), but she seems perfectly ambulatory without them at present. Is there anything else I could be doing for her?
 
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Dovey

Arachnobaron
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RE: dangling leg, never mind. I think I just watched her snip it off herself. These truly are extraordinary creatures, aren't they?
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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You stepped on your emilia??

How'd your T come out of the container and end up "hurling through space" ??

Don't remove the leg. They can do that themselves. Removing it yourself will cause more damage. They have a "valve" in their legs, and will amputate if necessary. The valve will shut preventing hemolymph loss.

The only thing to do is make sure your T has ample access to water bowls.
 

Ashley2070

Arachnopeon
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Aug 22, 2016
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Oh no! I'm so sorry to hear that.. I would feel just as awful if I did the same thing even though it was a total accident. If the carapace and opisthosoma don't looked crushed then hopefully its internal structure is fine.. If it's really just the legs then hopefully with the next molt your emilia will recover. If it seems like it's having a hard time catching its prey maybe give it some prekilled food? I really hope it pulls out and so sorry you accidentally hurt your baby!
 

Jones0911

Arachnobaron
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Mar 5, 2013
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One of my bigger Ts took it its own leg off because in my error all my containers weren't already set up.

so when I opened up the towel he was in I noticed one leg was off.

I contacted the dealer let them know I was at fault and they said he'll be ok just take care of him as you normally would.

He's been fine ever since, I was worried as much as you but different situations.
 

Trenor

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Jan 28, 2016
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Anyway, I have her in an observation container with moist paper towel.
I wouldn't keep her in the container with moist paper towels. I'd put her back into her home, make sure she has access to water and put her somewhere quite for a few days. Other than that there is not much you can do for her.

Sorry to hear about the accident. I hope she gets better.
 

magicmed

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Jun 4, 2016
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Aww sorry to hear about the incident, mistakes happen though and we learn from them. Don't beat yourself up, just keep taking care of the little one and hopefully next molt he will be just fine :)
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
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Feb 22, 2013
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Just keep it in the normal enclosure, ensure that it has constant access to a full, clean water dish, and feed it like crazy. You want it to molt as quickly as possible. Offer prekilled prey so that you're able to give it massive meals.

Accidents happen, don't beat yourself up too badly. Just learn from it.
 

14pokies

Arachnoprince
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Oct 25, 2014
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Don't beat yourself up too bad just learn from it..

I killed a B.boehmei while packing it for a customer.. She rushed out of the enclosure and hopped when she got to the edge of the encloures opening.. I had the deli container in one hand and the lid in my other.. I tried catching her but she hit the floor and ruptured..

I learned that terrestrial Ts can jump and never work with my hands full..I never should of had her enclosure that close to the edge of the table.. That was just stupidity..

It's a horrible feeling knowing you have hurt or killed an animal but mistakes happen man.. I hope she pulls through bro..
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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I learned that terrestrial Ts can jump and never work with my hands full..I never should of had her enclosure that close to the edge of the table..
How have you modified your technique?
 

Dovey

Arachnobaron
Joined
Apr 9, 2016
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547
You stepped on your emilia??

How'd your T come out of the container and end up "hurling through space" ??
I was opening the lid to remove her moult and add some moisture. She came springing out of her container like a trick snake from a tin and shot off the end of the table.
 

Dovey

Arachnobaron
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Apr 9, 2016
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I'm afraid she's too little for a water dish. Brand new 3rd instar--maybe as big as a black bean--1/4th inch on her fattest, stretchiest day. However, I have her in a relatively moist container with good circulation and live moss, and I add a few drops of water down one side each day that bead up on the side of her habitat for half an hour or so before they sink in.

This is AZ: low relative humidity (often in single digits), so all of my slings, even my local WC chalcodes, get more moist conditions than I would give them were I in a location with more temperate humidity. Entomologists have recently ascertained that, by burrowing down just 12-18 inches in many Sonoran Desert locations, our local sand roaches (Arenivega sp.) achieve steady temperatures in the 70's (while the surface temp may reach the 120's) with a constant humidity of 70% to 80%, which I find astonishing, and which captive spiders certainly can't match in a vial or terrarium.

And yep, I've offered her a pre-killed tiny dubia. She isn't a great eater at the best of times, though. I'm not sure dubias are the best prey for her since they are so still and such good burrowers. Maybe something more lively and flittery in future. My terrestrials seem to love anything that flutters wings, particularly the local silk moth, but the emilia is way too small for them yet.

How many days after shedding would a 3rd instar emilia normally be ready to take a meal? She shed 3 1/2 days ago.
 

Dovey

Arachnobaron
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Apr 9, 2016
Messages
547
Also, is that a real T in your photo or is it photoshopped? I've never seen that species.
Give it time. Follow the money. They'll start showing up in the trade eventually. Two things I know to be true: 1) every good story gets told, and 2) every strong market demand gets met. Both are just human nature at its best or worst, but certainly its most creative.
 
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