Shipping in cold weather

tony77tony77

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
May 28, 2006
Messages
292
I would like some advice in shipping over night a female P. Regalis in temps High is 40 and low is 20. Will it be safe to ship in that kinda weather even if I put in heatpacks?
 
Last edited:

Andrei

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 2, 2010
Messages
9
We are talking about Fahrenheit ok? In my opinion is way too cold. How much time will the package spend in this temperature?
 

Andrei

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 2, 2010
Messages
9
I don't belive she will survive 24 hours at that temperature. There should be at least 50 F.
 

Newflvr

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 20, 2009
Messages
142
Shipping

I don't belive she will survive 24 hours at that temperature. There should be at least 50 F.
I have shipped or recieved at least 15 packages in the last 2 weeks (I live in N.W Ohio). I'm not sure if your offering experience or an uneducated guess. To the O.P. use a styrofoam lined box w/ a 40 hr heat pack and as usual pack your T well in it's vial or deli. The other thing I change at this time of year , the paper towel I pack the T in is just lightly misted and express shipping only. I've had alot of success with this but I'm also stopping shipping in the middle of december. Good Luck PM me if you have any q's.
 

Andrei

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 2, 2010
Messages
9
I am not offering experience because I never tried to ship at that temperature because is to dangerous for the tarantula. If you succeded, I am happy for you but I wouldn't take the risk.
 

Stopdroproll

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 27, 2006
Messages
251
It is possible to ship it out in that temperature range so long as you packed it really well. Some members on here have received successful shipments, even packages that were late or exposed to the cold for longer than ideal. I think RobC has a video on winter packing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZcBGuWN-I4
 

satanslilhelper

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
May 24, 2009
Messages
734
I am not offering experience because I never tried to ship at that temperature because is to dangerous for the tarantula. If you succeded, I am happy for you but I wouldn't take the risk.
How can you state that it's too dangerous for the T if you have NO experience in this? I get that that is your opinion, but be careful how you word things. The way you wrote it makes it look like your implying that it's a fact and not just your personal opinion.
 

Newflvr

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 20, 2009
Messages
142
I am not offering experience because I never tried to ship at that temperature because is to dangerous for the tarantula. If you succeded, I am happy for you but I wouldn't take the risk.
Just like most things on here. If you don't have the experience to share and help the OP, then keep the fingers off the key board. In doing so you will learn a couple of things I promise.
 

Salamanderhead

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 30, 2009
Messages
410
You need an insulated box and a heat pack that will last as long as the shipping takes.
 

Salamanderhead

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 30, 2009
Messages
410
Warmer than -10 doesn't happen much in Canadian winters lol. Once January hits anyways.
 

dianedfisher

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 14, 2007
Messages
331
For winter, I pack in an insulated box, insulate each individual vial with bubble wrap and then put that box, wrapped in bubble wrap inside a larger box and put the 40 hour heat-pack inside the outer box. If you really think about it, how long is your USPS Express package really exposed to freezing temps? Postal workers aren't working in below freezing temps. Your packages are delivered in heated and air conditioned vehicles. I worry more about summer heat than I do winter weather. I think if you search there are also a few older threads about the benefit of extra dampness during winter because it takes more energy to freeze water than air. If you're super concerned, you can use foam cups, put some warm cricket jell in a plastic sandwhich bag and put your bubble-wrapped vial in the foam cup with lid and put this in your insulated box. You'd be surprised how long the warmed jell will hold it's temperature and how long it will take to chill the cup to a temperature below freezing once that it packed inside a secondary box.
 

gdreptiles

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 1, 2010
Messages
1
Hey Tony,

the 40hr heat packs seem to work great bcz we use insulated boxes as well when we pack and ship spiders. damp papertowels within deli cup help to keep the spider healthy during transit. be sure to put the heat pack inside newspaper as well so it's not right on top of the spider. this has always worked for us. one big thing about the winter though is the weather at the receiving end and when their driver drops off.
 

greenmonkey51

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 25, 2007
Messages
14
I will say though that you should only ship if you absolutely have to. It can be done, but I hate shipping anything this time of year.
 

robc

Arachnoemperor
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 10, 2007
Messages
3,831
It is possible to ship it out in that temperature range so long as you packed it really well. Some members on here have received successful shipments, even packages that were late or exposed to the cold for longer than ideal. I think RobC has a video on winter packing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oZcBGuWN-I4
I shipped out 22 boxes this week....to Minnesota, Michigan New york ect....15 of the boxes where priority....one was a 4 day priority to Michigan all came out running. I use a 3/4" all lined 7 X 7 X 6 Styrofoam (hand cut) box and 60 hour heatpacks for priority and 40 for express. These where all slings that where shipped.
 

LPacker79

ArachnoSpaz
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 10, 2003
Messages
1,056
I once had a well respected dealer ship me roughly $600 in spiders to Michigan.......in December. He did not use a heat pack.

After several hours of slowly warming up, they were fine. I've received numerous shipments over the past 11 or 12 years, many in the winter and I've never had one arrive DOA.
 
Top