Sexing Salticidae

Holly moon

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 20, 2020
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3
Hello! I have found an adult phidippus audax, and a zebra back sling. I would like to know what their sexes are as I'm having a hard time determining them. Please help, and if possible tell me how you can tell. Here are pics. The first pic is a tiny sling, and the last two are what I thought was the mother until I realized they are different species. Can a bold have zebra slings? As for the bold, She molted recently and the red spot on her abdomen turned white afterwards. Thank you!
 

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ReignofInvertebrates

Arachnodemon
Active Member
Joined
Dec 29, 2012
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666
These are two separate species. They can’t hybridize, so the bold jumper is not the mom of the zebra jumper (Salticus scenicus). Zebras are much smaller so you probably have a subadult or adult.

To me, the Salticus looks like a male. You can tell because the small modified pair of “legs” in front have bulbous tips, looking almost like boxing gloves. I can’t quite tell on the P. audax because they’re so fuzzy, but maybe someone who knows more about jumper morphology can tell from that pic.
 

DaveM

Arachnoknight
Active Member
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Jul 12, 2011
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207
I agree with ReignofInvertebrates that the Zebra is male. The females have whiter pedipalpi and femura, and a narrower black lateral band around the cephalothorax.
About the P. audax, if this was collected in the midwest (guessing from your profile), I think this is a subadult. The spot on the abdomen looks orange and will turn white on the ultimate molt. To my knowledge, only specimens from Florida and the Gulf Coast keep the orange color into adulthood.
Coloration is diagnostic, so the color-filtered photos make sexing harder. Males have more iridescent green on the chelicerae (but females still have a little bit). I can't tell from the photos. It becomes easy when they are mature to look at the pedipalps (modified front pair of legs) where the males will have bulbs, as the previous poster mentions.
 
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