Serious questions from an arachnophobe- about species, enclosures etc.

SwedishArachnophobe84

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 4, 2020
Messages
8
Hello!

Please excuse the spelling and grammar etc. English is not my first language; hope you still get the point I’m trying to make and get what I´m asking etc.

Alright…I’m now writing that which I never in a million years thought I would write, but here we are. This is probably a sign that I’m getting completely insane…but oh…well…

In all my life I have been completely terrified of spiders (at least as long as I can remember), arachnophobia in its most severe form. I can tolerate very tiny spiders without panicking but if that spider would end up on me, I still panic. This despite the fact that I can leave them be if they´re in a corner off my room for example (that is if they have made a web). I started working on that acceptance when a small spider decided to make a web between two of my flowerpots (in one of my windows). This spider was actually molting etc. and lived in its web for quite a while…but either it moved/went outside or died. I feed that one on occasion…when a fly ended up inside etc. Very interesting to watch…from a distance...

Sweden does not have any dangerous spiders and not (in comparison to other countries) any really large spiders. Some of the largest spiders here in Sweden are the so called ”house spiders” (smaller/common: Tegenaria domestica and large: Eratigena atrica). One of those (not sure if it was the smaller/common one or the large one…disgusting and big is all I know) once entered my apartment (as an example of the level of my phobia). It ran past me when I was sitting on the floor = somehow, I suddenly were about half a meter to a meter away and standing up, no idea how I got up. I managed to kill it by smashing it with my trashcan that was nearby (yeah, I know the person who loves animals ends up “murdering” an animal…but there is just no other way for me, I just cannot handle doing something else, the feeling of panic is way too severe). After killing the spider, I sat for several HOURS shaking in my entire body due to the anxiety!

Memes that says something like ”Burn down the house” due to not finding a spider…I feel like that is definitely in proportion to the problem…almost.

Because of this crippling feeling of panic/anxiety…(we are talking on a crazy level, when writing about the spider above…I got shivers down my spine just for thinking about it) I would like to reduce or even remove this phobia. Being terrified of having the door or a window open during hot summer days, constantly looking around for ”monsters” with eight legs etc. is no fun. I hate basements and garages and the like. I love summer, the heat and so on…but to me (all my life) summer comes with a backside…which is the increased risk of ending up having a spider inside the apartment or even worse ON you etc. this sadly takes away a great deal of the charm of the summer months. I hate snow, ice and the cold winter…but…there is less risk of encountering spiders…so that is a plus.

Despite all of the above…I´m very fascinated with spiders and have no problem (almost, apart from some shivers down my spine once in a while and being a bit more jumpy afterwards…like if I get a leaf on me or something like such…leaves are scary, ok…hehe…) looking at pictures or documentaries/YouTube-clips of tarantulas and the like.

Sometimes the thought has hit me…this time it´s etched itself (more than usual) on my mind…that is; maybe I should get myself a spider as a pet…and thus forcing myself to take care of it and hopefully become less “panicky” after a while…but I don´t know if it is worth the risk of not being able to sleep ever again, always having to sit and stare at the terrarium making sure it´s not escaping etc. Then again, I already have trouble sleeping…but still…hehe. Would I even dare opening the terrarium…that´s also the question…what if it “bolts” and gets out…having a bit of a panic attack just thinking about that…

I like looking at (yes, I´m weird, I know) ”Dark Den” and others like that on YouTube. I find it very interesting even if I die every time a spider ”bolts”, escapes or showing off a ”threat pose” etc.

I literally felt like shit when I first brought home some dubias (I have lizards, a frog and a turtle), I´m not exactly a fan of that sort of bugs either…but I have calmed down quite a bit. The first time I had dubias at home…I slept with a light literally right in my face, to make it less likely to wake up with a roach in my face. I´m still not a fan and refuse to touch them and doing a thorough clean of their enclosures was less than fun; however, one escaped female found in a box full of papers did not really bother me (I still have no clue as to how she got out).

I don’t know if it would be similar/the same if I got a spider though. I don’t like roaches and that sort of bugs (well…bugs in general) but I don’t have an actual phobia of these creatures…spiders are on a vastly different level of scary to me.

I have after looking through a bunch of YouTube-clips etc. decided that the following species are more interesting to me than others:

  • Trinidad Dwarf Tiger Tarantula (Cyriocosmus elegans) – but…they seem rather (very) fast = total panic. I like the heart on their but, a bit different looking.
  • Chilean Flame Tarantula (Eathlus sp. Red) – however it seems like the often climb out of the terrarium and can be pretty fast = total panic.
  • Desert Blonde/Arizona Blonde Tarantula (Aphonopelma chalcodes) – So freaking enormous…but I do think they look slightly less creepy than for example completely black spiders etc. Often recommended for beginners, although some seem to be a bit angry/like to kick hairs.
  • Mexican red knee (ex. Brachypelma hamorii, former Smithi) – Seems like a good choice for a beginner, nice colors but as with the “Arizona Blonde”…enormous…yikes!

Of the above mentioned species the ”Arizona Blonde” feels like the most interesting species to me, but in that case a “nice/kind” specimen…the thought of an aggressive maniac that also happens to be gigantic…not a very appealing thought.

I have an empty (at the moment) 30x30x30 cm (that is the mini wide, 12x12x12) Exo Terra terrarium but have been thinking about buying some more small Exo Terra terrariums (good for different “small stuff”) for example 20x20x20/30 cm (ex. Nano wide/nano tall, 8x8x8/8x8x12) etc. I have seen a lot of people using different types of plastic boxes etc. But I need it to be totally escape proof! How do you keep your spiders/tarantulas? What is the best enclosure type; a plastic box or a terrarium regarding the ”can under no circumstances be able to get out” point of view? Would any of these sizes work or do you believe it needs to be bigger/smaller? If using one of the Exo Terra terrariums; does anything have to be done about the screen top (like putting Plexiglas there instead) or can you use the regular Exo Terra top as is? Are there any rules regarding the size of the enclosure for spiders?

Are this the worst idea ever…that is the question…but I can’t really get the thought out of my head…we will see how this develops. I have seen some “Youtubers” that have done what I´m contemplation doing and they have been able to “cure” themselves…but I don’t know to what degree they had arachnophobia before getting their first tarantula…

Is there any particular species that you would like to recommend (one that is not “going to bolt/be skittish”)? What size would you recommend for a beginner who does not want a fast spider that’s likely to bolt? Juvenile/adult?

Getting a Sling feels like a smart idea because of the fact that I´m not as terrified of smaller (tiny) spiders but…at the same time it feels like the dumbest idea ever, due to the fact that they seem more prone to be ”skittish/more likely going to bolt” and faster than bigger spiders… also because they seem more sensitive to mistakes in their care, and because you can’t know their sex etc.

How big does it have to be to be able to sex it? Are there any difference regarding “temperament”/behavior due to the spider’s sex (female/male)?


I’m sensitive/allergic to wasps/bees…can this cause a problem with owning a spider? Could this mean that I could react more to the urticating hairs? I don´t even want to think about getting bitten, the thought of a spider that bites…not a pleasant thought…being bitten by an eight legged “monster” is not something I would like to think about…just hell no!

If you have any of the species mentioned above feel free to give me more information/describe your personal experience. As always it´s useful to hear from people who actually have the species in question (regarding any animal one is thinking about possible purchasing) …so please tell me what you think, about your experiences etc. Your contribution will be valued.

Thanks!

/SwedishArachnophobe84
 

jrh3

ArachnoMafia
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Jun 4, 2011
Messages
567
You should hang around the forums for a few months before even considering getting a Tarantula.

Have you thought about how you would get it out if the shipping box and into the container without panicking?

If you insist on getting one, T. Albopilosum would be a good choice too.
 

SwedishArachnophobe84

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 4, 2020
Messages
8
You should hang around the forums for a few months before even considering getting a Tarantula.

Have you thought about how you would get it out if the shipping box and into the container without panicking?

If you insist on getting one, T. Albopilosum would be a good choice too.
I will absolutely not jump into this without really considering it and researching tarantulas and the different possible species for a long time. I have thought about this back and forth for several years and no matter what kind of animal I´m thinking about getting; I´m always doing plenty of research first. Even if it´s “just” an insect, snail or whatever, it´s still an animal that deserves the best possible care and it´s a commitment (long or short but nonetheless a commitment). With an animal that I am having a “problem” with (such as being scared of/having a phobia), it obviously becomes even more important to really think it through. I don´t believe in getting pets and then selling them, I believe in keeping the animals I get for their entire lifespan (obviously stuff can happen that makes this impossible, but this is always the mindset I have when buying an animal).

When it comes to the question you had about “rehousing” the spider when I (in case I decide to get one) first bring it home. I´m not 100% sure about how to manage this yet but I have thought about this and I have a few possible options in mind. The best alternatives I have come up with so far are asking someone without a fear of spiders to do this for me, buying a spider with the enclosure (aka. the spider already living in it´s terrarium) or asking the seller to put the spider in the terrarium for me (if I get it from someone delivering the spider personally/or buying it in an Expo or such). Either way doing everything to not having to do it myself…especially rehousing it the first time (if it would need to be rehoused more than once). The less preferable alternative (if no one of the above listed ways would work) is to put the “shipping-box” in the terrarium and then remove the lid (and whatever covers the entrance with a pair of tweezers) and then let the spider walk out into the terrarium by itself (in its own pace); while having the terrarium closed.

/SwedishArachnophobe84
 

darkness975

dream reaper
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Aug 31, 2012
Messages
3,853
@cold blood had told someone a long time ago that was contemplating getting a Tarantula to help them overcome their Arachnophobia that they should consider a Grammostola porteri / rosea for this endeavor. The reason for it is because a large portion of them are incredibly sedentary - often sitting in the same exact position for hours and even days at times.

However, even the sedentary G. porteri is capable of a sudden quick bolt, especially if startled. Mine does not move particularly fast even if that does happen. But they are all different.

Honestly, as was stated above, hanging around here for a good long while is your best course of action right now. A large portion of the fears about these animals (and other animals) come from a lack of understanding. Getting to know how they behave and why will eliminate the layers of mystery and unknown that surround them and make them much more of a "familiar" entity.

Be careful with Youtube channels. A large percentage of them will intentionally rile up the spiders and/or use close up camera angles and other actions to make the videos more "entertaining" and "exciting." I personally do not support this but that's what a lot of them do. In reality they are not like that movie Arachnophobia, they don't jump up 3 feet and fly across the room to rip out your jugular vein like they depicted in that movie.
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
3,699
A lot of the basics are covered in Tarantula Information for Beginners (and More), especially in the thread Fantastic Beginner Tarantulas and How to Keep Them.

If, after reading that, you have any specific questions about care or species, we'd be happy to help.


How do you keep your spiders/tarantulas? What is the best enclosure type; a plastic box or a terrarium regarding the ”can under no circumstances be able to get out” point of view?
With terrestrial species that don't require a lot of substrate for burrowing (most commonly recommended beginner species are terrestrial), I keep my juveniles and adult dwarf species in small Exo Terra Breeding Boxes (8" x 8" x 5.5").


If using one of the Exo Terra terrariums; does anything have to be done about the screen top (like putting Plexiglas there instead) or can you use the regular Exo Terra top as is?
Screen lids should be covered or replaced, as tarantulas can get their tarsal claws stuck in the mesh, which may cause them to amputate a limb or hurt themselves in a fall while attempting to free themselves.


Are there any rules regarding the size of the enclosure for spiders?
The most important thing is to give them enough horizontal room (minimally about 2-3 times their leg span) while limiting vertical space (the distance between the top of the substrate and the bottom of the lid) to no more than 1.5 times their leg span. This is to reduce the risk of injuries from falls.


Is there any particular species that you would like to recommend (one that is not “going to bolt/be skittish”)? What size would you recommend for a beginner who does not want a fast spider that’s likely to bolt? Juvenile/adult?
Any of the species you listed could be good for beginners. In particular, Homoeomma chilensis (formerly Euathlus sp. "red") is known for its gentle, inquisitive nature.

Aphonopelma chalcodes is often pretty docile, but every now and then people do end up with one that has a different temperament. (The same is true of any species: most may have a particular temperament, but it's possible to get an exception, and temperament can change as it grows.)

Here are some other species that tend to be docile and not prone to sudden movements (except when responding to prey):
  • Brachypelma emilia
  • Grammostola porteri
  • Grammostola pulchra
  • Grammostola rosea


Getting a Sling feels like a smart idea because of the fact that I´m not as terrified of smaller (tiny) spiders but…at the same time it feels like the dumbest idea ever, due to the fact that they seem more prone to be ”skittish/more likely going to bolt” and faster than bigger spiders… also because they seem more sensitive to mistakes in their care, and because you can’t know their sex etc.
You may want to consider a small juvenile, as it has grown past the fragile stage and is less likely to be skittish but still small enough not to be too intimidating.


How big does it have to be to be able to sex it?
Sexing is not easy at sizes smaller than 2-3 inches, and it's most reliable with a molt.


Are there any difference regarding “temperament”/behavior due to the spider’s sex (female/male)?
Temperament doesn't vary by sex except that a mature male will generally wander a lot and eat less.


I’m sensitive/allergic to wasps/bees…can this cause a problem with owning a spider? Could this mean that I could react more to the urticating hairs?
I don't think that being sensitive to wasp/bee stings necessarily means you will be sensitive to urticating hairs.

That being said, you can greatly reduce the risk of exposure by not handling the tarantula, not sticking your bare hands in the enclosure (use tongs), wearing gloves when washing things that were removed from the enclosure, and washing your hands after doing maintenance.


When it comes to the question you had about “rehousing” the spider when I (in case I decide to get one) first bring it home. I´m not 100% sure about how to manage this yet but I have thought about this and I have a few possible options in mind.
The easiest way to rehouse -- if it's not already in a small shipping container -- is to get the spider into a catch cup and then transfer the catch cup to the new enclosure and let it walk out on its own.
 

Vanisher

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 2, 2004
Messages
2,477
Hello!

Please excuse the spelling and grammar etc. English is not my first language; hope you still get the point I’m trying to make and get what I´m asking etc.

Alright…I’m now writing that which I never in a million years thought I would write, but here we are. This is probably a sign that I’m getting completely insane…but oh…well…

In all my life I have been completely terrified of spiders (at least as long as I can remember), arachnophobia in its most severe form. I can tolerate very tiny spiders without panicking but if that spider would end up on me, I still panic. This despite the fact that I can leave them be if they´re in a corner off my room for example (that is if they have made a web). I started working on that acceptance when a small spider decided to make a web between two of my flowerpots (in one of my windows). This spider was actually molting etc. and lived in its web for quite a while…but either it moved/went outside or died. I feed that one on occasion…when a fly ended up inside etc. Very interesting to watch…from a distance...

Sweden does not have any dangerous spiders and not (in comparison to other countries) any really large spiders. Some of the largest spiders here in Sweden are the so called ”house spiders” (smaller/common: Tegenaria domestica and large: Eratigena atrica). One of those (not sure if it was the smaller/common one or the large one…disgusting and big is all I know) once entered my apartment (as an example of the level of my phobia). It ran past me when I was sitting on the floor = somehow, I suddenly were about half a meter to a meter away and standing up, no idea how I got up. I managed to kill it by smashing it with my trashcan that was nearby (yeah, I know the person who loves animals ends up “murdering” an animal…but there is just no other way for me, I just cannot handle doing something else, the feeling of panic is way too severe). After killing the spider, I sat for several HOURS shaking in my entire body due to the anxiety!

Memes that says something like ”Burn down the house” due to not finding a spider…I feel like that is definitely in proportion to the problem…almost.

Because of this crippling feeling of panic/anxiety…(we are talking on a crazy level, when writing about the spider above…I got shivers down my spine just for thinking about it) I would like to reduce or even remove this phobia. Being terrified of having the door or a window open during hot summer days, constantly looking around for ”monsters” with eight legs etc. is no fun. I hate basements and garages and the like. I love summer, the heat and so on…but to me (all my life) summer comes with a backside…which is the increased risk of ending up having a spider inside the apartment or even worse ON you etc. this sadly takes away a great deal of the charm of the summer months. I hate snow, ice and the cold winter…but…there is less risk of encountering spiders…so that is a plus.

Despite all of the above…I´m very fascinated with spiders and have no problem (almost, apart from some shivers down my spine once in a while and being a bit more jumpy afterwards…like if I get a leaf on me or something like such…leaves are scary, ok…hehe…) looking at pictures or documentaries/YouTube-clips of tarantulas and the like.

Sometimes the thought has hit me…this time it´s etched itself (more than usual) on my mind…that is; maybe I should get myself a spider as a pet…and thus forcing myself to take care of it and hopefully become less “panicky” after a while…but I don´t know if it is worth the risk of not being able to sleep ever again, always having to sit and stare at the terrarium making sure it´s not escaping etc. Then again, I already have trouble sleeping…but still…hehe. Would I even dare opening the terrarium…that´s also the question…what if it “bolts” and gets out…having a bit of a panic attack just thinking about that…

I like looking at (yes, I´m weird, I know) ”Dark Den” and others like that on YouTube. I find it very interesting even if I die every time a spider ”bolts”, escapes or showing off a ”threat pose” etc.

I literally felt like shit when I first brought home some dubias (I have lizards, a frog and a turtle), I´m not exactly a fan of that sort of bugs either…but I have calmed down quite a bit. The first time I had dubias at home…I slept with a light literally right in my face, to make it less likely to wake up with a roach in my face. I´m still not a fan and refuse to touch them and doing a thorough clean of their enclosures was less than fun; however, one escaped female found in a box full of papers did not really bother me (I still have no clue as to how she got out).

I don’t know if it would be similar/the same if I got a spider though. I don’t like roaches and that sort of bugs (well…bugs in general) but I don’t have an actual phobia of these creatures…spiders are on a vastly different level of scary to me.

I have after looking through a bunch of YouTube-clips etc. decided that the following species are more interesting to me than others:

  • Trinidad Dwarf Tiger Tarantula (Cyriocosmus elegans) – but…they seem rather (very) fast = total panic. I like the heart on their but, a bit different looking.
  • Chilean Flame Tarantula (Eathlus sp. Red) – however it seems like the often climb out of the terrarium and can be pretty fast = total panic.
  • Desert Blonde/Arizona Blonde Tarantula (Aphonopelma chalcodes) – So freaking enormous…but I do think they look slightly less creepy than for example completely black spiders etc. Often recommended for beginners, although some seem to be a bit angry/like to kick hairs.
  • Mexican red knee (ex. Brachypelma hamorii, former Smithi) – Seems like a good choice for a beginner, nice colors but as with the “Arizona Blonde”…enormous…yikes!

Of the above mentioned species the ”Arizona Blonde” feels like the most interesting species to me, but in that case a “nice/kind” specimen…the thought of an aggressive maniac that also happens to be gigantic…not a very appealing thought.

I have an empty (at the moment) 30x30x30 cm (that is the mini wide, 12x12x12) Exo Terra terrarium but have been thinking about buying some more small Exo Terra terrariums (good for different “small stuff”) for example 20x20x20/30 cm (ex. Nano wide/nano tall, 8x8x8/8x8x12) etc. I have seen a lot of people using different types of plastic boxes etc. But I need it to be totally escape proof! How do you keep your spiders/tarantulas? What is the best enclosure type; a plastic box or a terrarium regarding the ”can under no circumstances be able to get out” point of view? Would any of these sizes work or do you believe it needs to be bigger/smaller? If using one of the Exo Terra terrariums; does anything have to be done about the screen top (like putting Plexiglas there instead) or can you use the regular Exo Terra top as is? Are there any rules regarding the size of the enclosure for spiders?

Are this the worst idea ever…that is the question…but I can’t really get the thought out of my head…we will see how this develops. I have seen some “Youtubers” that have done what I´m contemplation doing and they have been able to “cure” themselves…but I don’t know to what degree they had arachnophobia before getting their first tarantula…

Is there any particular species that you would like to recommend (one that is not “going to bolt/be skittish”)? What size would you recommend for a beginner who does not want a fast spider that’s likely to bolt? Juvenile/adult?

Getting a Sling feels like a smart idea because of the fact that I´m not as terrified of smaller (tiny) spiders but…at the same time it feels like the dumbest idea ever, due to the fact that they seem more prone to be ”skittish/more likely going to bolt” and faster than bigger spiders… also because they seem more sensitive to mistakes in their care, and because you can’t know their sex etc.

How big does it have to be to be able to sex it? Are there any difference regarding “temperament”/behavior due to the spider’s sex (female/male)?


I’m sensitive/allergic to wasps/bees…can this cause a problem with owning a spider? Could this mean that I could react more to the urticating hairs? I don´t even want to think about getting bitten, the thought of a spider that bites…not a pleasant thought…being bitten by an eight legged “monster” is not something I would like to think about…just hell no!

If you have any of the species mentioned above feel free to give me more information/describe your personal experience. As always it´s useful to hear from people who actually have the species in question (regarding any animal one is thinking about possible purchasing) …so please tell me what you think, about your experiences etc. Your contribution will be valued.

Thanks!

/SwedishArachnophobe84
Hello. Nice long, intresting post. First off, fun with another person from Sweden here on the boards. I am from Öland myself.
Secondly. If you are this arachnophobic it is not a good idea to het a tarantula just now. Getting a tarantula means interactions with it in one or another way. Prodding it out from the shipping container can be extreamly hard i one has arachnophobia i can amagine. And you seems to have severe arachnophobia?. What if the spider bolts, or running up your arm? This can be very dangerous for the spider. When interacting with it, you have to be calm and know what you doing. And if the spider is getting on you. You have to be equally calm. Otherwise you can harm or kill it!
My suggestion to you is simple. Be a member on the fb group "Vi som älskar fågelspindlar" or maybe it is just called "Fågelspindlar"? I am not a member anymore so i dont remember the name. There should be people that live near Örebro there? Try to contact someone near your place and ask if you can visit. Go visit him/her and you can see tarantulas on a distance. And see that person moving them and so on, and you can ask questions ect. Be active on that group for a while and if your arachnophobia beginns to ease, THEN you can think of buying a tarantula

Vänliga hälsningar Johan
 

KaroKoenig

Arachnopeon
Active Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2019
Messages
45
From the list you have made yourself, the Brachypelma hamorii would be the best by far. The problem with Aphonopelma chalcodes on our side of the Atlantic is that they are often wild-caught. They are not regularly bred in captivity over here.

Some good tips given here already, let me add a few (from an ex-arachnophobe who now keeps two tarantulas with a few more coming soon):

- On top of hanging out here in the forum: Be around actual tarantulas. Find local places where you can. Make contact with hobbyists or breeders from the region. Usually, there is some sort of tarantula club or something like that not too far away. The reason is: Frankly, you can read and watch videos all day long, it IS a different situation when the actual animal is around. It's not exactly much more terrifying, don't worry. It is just... different. You very quickly get a feel for the way they move, their idiosyncracies, so to speak. That does a great deal in getting used to them.

- ExoTerra enclosures have several disadvantages, but especially for beginners who are still uncomfortable with their tarantulas, they have one huge advantage: they can be opened from the front and the top. That means, if you fear your pet could make an unexpected dash through the front door, just do the maintenance from up top. With a hamorii for example, it is highly unlikely that when startled, it bolts right up the glass and out. Also, as far as I know, the 30 cm ExoTerra cubes have a double front door, which is also great for beginners who fear escape. We can talk about the disadvantages of ExoTerras - and how to alleviate those - later.

- Tarantula speed: Let's face it. Even the most laid-back species are capable of quick bursts. If they weren't, evolution would have made short work of them. Any tarantula is very quick when attacking prey, for example. Nothing to worry about, but be ready for it.

- Size/age of your first tarantula: from my experience, stariting with a smaller specimen worked great. A B. hamorii with around 3-3.5 cm body length does the trick. They are not as fragile as small spiderlings anymore, yet they are not those big chunks with big fangs and an uncomfortable number of apendages. You can grow together with your spider that way. The fact that as smaller specimens, they are faster and tend to bolt a bit isn't that worrisome when you can do your maintenance from the top.

- enclosure setup: Here's where bloody wars rage between keepers on both sides of the Atlantic and within Europe. Let's not get into that here and let's just say: The tarantulas themselves seem to not mind very much if they have fake or real plants, light or no light (as long as it's not super bright), etc. For a beginner, the most important thing is to set up the enclosure in a way that the animal has all it needs (hide or hides, access to water, enough substrate, etc.) and the keeper can work in the enclosure well enough, reach every spot if need be, etc. Test your water dish, try if you can lift it out using tongs at first. Later, when you know your animal better, you'll most likely just grab it and that's that. If you spend a few thoughts on those matters before dumping the animal in, you can save yourself a lot of trouble later. Enclosures can be very pretty AND practical - AND siutable for the animal.

- Letting someone else do the work for you: Bad idea in my opinion. You are getting an animal you need to care for, you better do it yourself from the start. Rehousing any of the usual beginner tarantulas isn't a big deal, really. Especially if you have a way of opening the enclosure from the top. As you said. just put the transport box into the enclosure, open the lid and tickle the spider out with a soft brush - or let it explore on its own. Do it with the enclosure in a larger box, have catch cups ready. Watch Tom Moran's rehousing videos for reference.
 

Thekla

Arachnoprince
Arachnosupporter
Joined
Oct 13, 2017
Messages
1,694
First of all, welcome! :) You have definitely come to the best place to get sound advice. :)

Secondly, I don't think your arachnophobia is as severe as it gets. ;) If you are able to have small ones living in your house and watch videos about them I'm pretty sure you will be able to get over it... with time and patience and a lot of reading and getting to know these amazing creatures. :)
I would recommend watching @Tomoran's videos. By his own admission, he had severe arachnophobia when he first got into tarantulas and even passed out once. And now he's probably one of the most knowledgeable keepers you can find. And his videos, especially his rehousing videos, are not made for views... no bolting, no threat postures to get clicks, just pure education. :)

As for housing, I wouldn't use Exo Terra's glass enclosures for a terrestrial. Because of the front doors, you won't be able to fill up the substrate to a safe level. As said before there shouldn't be more than 1,5x DLS of your T in height (between substrate and the top). I would recommend a RUB (= really useful box) to house a terrestrial spider. They come in lots of different sizes and heights. They are sturdy and have these really secure handles no spider on earth would be able to open. Something to keep your mind at rest at night. ;)

When it comes to beginner species, yes, most of the Aphonopelma, Brachypelma, Grammostola or Tliltocatl species are a good bet, but they all get quite large - not as large as several other genera -, still, maybe a bit intimidating at first. Out of the ones you mentioned in your post I would definitely recommend the Homoeomma chilensis (ex Euathlus sp. red) - if you could find one, that is. :wacky: Yes, they are known to be curious and start to wander around, but they have the sweetest and most docile disposition out of all the Ts. And believe me, they are not fast. They're prone to fast, yes, but they are not fast. ;) Mine made a "runner" when I first got him (well, I was very new as well and didn't know any better), but in hindsight, his "bolting" out of the container was more like "Nope, I don't like it here, just have me have a look around if there's something better. Don't worry, I'll be home at 10 pm". :rofl:
A close second would be Thrixopelma cyaneolum. They also are medium-sized and very, very docile. Mine just love to wave her butt whenever I need to mess with her or her enclosure. Well, she might think she could scare me with that, but in reality, it's just the cutest thing. :kiss:

Just one advice regarding your list... don't get a dwarf species. They are skittish and they bolt, and unlike other Ts they don't bolt in short bursts, no, they run and they don't stop running. :wacky:

- Tarantula speed: Let's face it. Even the most laid-back species are capable of quick bursts. If they weren't, evolution would have made short work of them. Any tarantula is very quick when attacking prey, for example. Nothing to worry about, but be ready for it.
This! :)
 

SwedishArachnophobe84

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 4, 2020
Messages
8
@cold blood had told someone a long time ago that was contemplating getting a Tarantula to help them overcome their Arachnophobia that they should consider a Grammostola porteri / rosea for this endeavor. The reason for it is because a large portion of them are incredibly sedentary - often sitting in the same exact position for hours and even days at times.

However, even the sedentary G. porteri is capable of a sudden quick bolt, especially if startled. Mine does not move particularly fast even if that does happen. But they are all different.

Honestly, as was stated above, hanging around here for a good long while is your best course of action right now. A large portion of the fears about these animals (and other animals) come from a lack of understanding. Getting to know how they behave and why will eliminate the layers of mystery and unknown that surround them and make them much more of a "familiar" entity.

Be careful with Youtube channels. A large percentage of them will intentionally rile up the spiders and/or use close up camera angles and other actions to make the videos more "entertaining" and "exciting." I personally do not support this but that's what a lot of them do. In reality they are not like that movie Arachnophobia, they don't jump up 3 feet and fly across the room to rip out your jugular vein like they depicted in that movie.
Ok, I will definitely think about the whole “any spider can bolt if startled” part of your answer before possible purchasing a spider in the future.

Personally, I don´t think my fear of spiders have to do with lack of understanding or lack of knowledge regarding spiders; as I stated in my description, I enjoy watching documentaries etc. and have always had a sort of fascination of spiders despite my fears. I think they display a lot of interesting behaviors and like learning about these things. I have read some books, articles, care sheets etc. as well and believe I have enough of an understanding of these creatures not to consider myself “ignorant” and therefore fear them because of that…it’s a phobia aka. it´s an irrational fear. I am perfectly aware of the fact that they will not try to kill me/harm me just because; It´s an animal with its own fears and it will possible defend itself because of this, not due to ill will. While watching YouTube I´m trying my best not to believe everything I see and make an informed decision (regarding for example a specific species) by looking into many different sources (just like I would with any type of research).

I´m not quite sure what feature films/movies/tv-shows have to do with anything…but I am very aware of the fact that movies don´t depict reality…I mean look at Lord of The Rings for example…that is one large as spider, hehe. I know that as with any animal that have a tendency to install fear in people (like insects, rats, mice, snakes as well as spiders) moviemakers tend to exaggerate a lot. As someone who adores mice, rats and snakes…I can definitely see that…and recognize the same way of exaggeration regarding insects (which I don´t exactly like) and spiders (actual phobia), my rational thought process can pick up on that and of course the fact that I know a lot about very many types and species of animals (I have an education in “animal care” and have had/have different kinds of animals since I was a toddler; pretty much anything from reptiles, amphibians, fish and snails to different kinds of rodents, rabbits, dogs and birds).

/SwedishArachnophobe84

A lot of the basics are covered in Tarantula Information for Beginners (and More), especially in the thread Fantastic Beginner Tarantulas and How to Keep Them.

If, after reading that, you have any specific questions about care or species, we'd be happy to help.




With terrestrial species that don't require a lot of substrate for burrowing (most commonly recommended beginner species are terrestrial), I keep my juveniles and adult dwarf species in small Exo Terra Breeding Boxes (8" x 8" x 5.5").




Screen lids should be covered or replaced, as tarantulas can get their tarsal claws stuck in the mesh, which may cause them to amputate a limb or hurt themselves in a fall while attempting to free themselves.




The most important thing is to give them enough horizontal room (minimally about 2-3 times their leg span) while limiting vertical space (the distance between the top of the substrate and the bottom of the lid) to no more than 1.5 times their leg span. This is to reduce the risk of injuries from falls.




Any of the species you listed could be good for beginners. In particular, Homoeomma chilensis (formerly Euathlus sp. "red") is known for its gentle, inquisitive nature.

Aphonopelma chalcodes is often pretty docile, but every now and then people do end up with one that has a different temperament. (The same is true of any species: most may have a particular temperament, but it's possible to get an exception, and temperament can change as it grows.)

Here are some other species that tend to be docile and not prone to sudden movements (except when responding to prey):
  • Brachypelma emilia
  • Grammostola porteri
  • Grammostola pulchra
  • Grammostola rosea




You may want to consider a small juvenile, as it has grown past the fragile stage and is less likely to be skittish but still small enough not to be too intimidating.




Sexing is not easy at sizes smaller than 2-3 inches, and it's most reliable with a molt.




Temperament doesn't vary by sex except that a mature male will generally wander a lot and eat less.




I don't think that being sensitive to wasp/bee stings necessarily means you will be sensitive to urticating hairs.

That being said, you can greatly reduce the risk of exposure by not handling the tarantula, not sticking your bare hands in the enclosure (use tongs), wearing gloves when washing things that were removed from the enclosure, and washing your hands after doing maintenance.




The easiest way to rehouse -- if it's not already in a small shipping container -- is to get the spider into a catch cup and then transfer the catch cup to the new enclosure and let it walk out on its own.

Thank you for the links and for taking the time to answer questions. I will take your points into consideration when doing more research and while planning for a possible tarantula in the future.

I will definitely not put my hands in the enclosure or handle the tarantula (the thought of having it in my hand freaks me out like nothing else).

I´m planning on doing what I do with the dubias = using tweezers/tongs to get their “bowls” etc. and also using gloves while cleaning my feeder insects’ enclosures. When dealing with the mealworms and when cleaning the roaches out; I also cover my mouth (“by wearing a “mask”) to avoid breathing in the “dust” (I do not want to risk having to sell my beloved lizards/frog). I take these extra precautions when taking care of my feeder insects, because of the fact that I became allergic (I get very itchy in my hands) to mosquito larvae; after handling the red frozen ones (and some white ones) as a child (when I had a lot of animals eating that on a regular basis).

/SwedishArachnophobe84

From the list you have made yourself, the Brachypelma hamorii would be the best by far. The problem with Aphonopelma chalcodes on our side of the Atlantic is that they are often wild-caught. They are not regularly bred in captivity over here.

Some good tips given here already, let me add a few (from an ex-arachnophobe who now keeps two tarantulas with a few more coming soon):

- On top of hanging out here in the forum: Be around actual tarantulas. Find local places where you can. Make contact with hobbyists or breeders from the region. Usually, there is some sort of tarantula club or something like that not too far away. The reason is: Frankly, you can read and watch videos all day long, it IS a different situation when the actual animal is around. It's not exactly much more terrifying, don't worry. It is just... different. You very quickly get a feel for the way they move, their idiosyncracies, so to speak. That does a great deal in getting used to them.

- ExoTerra enclosures have several disadvantages, but especially for beginners who are still uncomfortable with their tarantulas, they have one huge advantage: they can be opened from the front and the top. That means, if you fear your pet could make an unexpected dash through the front door, just do the maintenance from up top. With a hamorii for example, it is highly unlikely that when startled, it bolts right up the glass and out. Also, as far as I know, the 30 cm ExoTerra cubes have a double front door, which is also great for beginners who fear escape. We can talk about the disadvantages of ExoTerras - and how to alleviate those - later.

- Tarantula speed: Let's face it. Even the most laid-back species are capable of quick bursts. If they weren't, evolution would have made short work of them. Any tarantula is very quick when attacking prey, for example. Nothing to worry about, but be ready for it.

- Size/age of your first tarantula: from my experience, stariting with a smaller specimen worked great. A B. hamorii with around 3-3.5 cm body length does the trick. They are not as fragile as small spiderlings anymore, yet they are not those big chunks with big fangs and an uncomfortable number of apendages. You can grow together with your spider that way. The fact that as smaller specimens, they are faster and tend to bolt a bit isn't that worrisome when you can do your maintenance from the top.

- enclosure setup: Here's where bloody wars rage between keepers on both sides of the Atlantic and within Europe. Let's not get into that here and let's just say: The tarantulas themselves seem to not mind very much if they have fake or real plants, light or no light (as long as it's not super bright), etc. For a beginner, the most important thing is to set up the enclosure in a way that the animal has all it needs (hide or hides, access to water, enough substrate, etc.) and the keeper can work in the enclosure well enough, reach every spot if need be, etc. Test your water dish, try if you can lift it out using tongs at first. Later, when you know your animal better, you'll most likely just grab it and that's that. If you spend a few thoughts on those matters before dumping the animal in, you can save yourself a lot of trouble later. Enclosures can be very pretty AND practical - AND siutable for the animal.

- Letting someone else do the work for you: Bad idea in my opinion. You are getting an animal you need to care for, you better do it yourself from the start. Rehousing any of the usual beginner tarantulas isn't a big deal, really. Especially if you have a way of opening the enclosure from the top. As you said. just put the transport box into the enclosure, open the lid and tickle the spider out with a soft brush - or let it explore on its own. Do it with the enclosure in a larger box, have catch cups ready. Watch Tom Moran's rehousing videos for reference.
Ok, regarding wild caught animals; I am very much against this and will (if I decide to buy a spider, regardless of my chosen species) make sure that I will get a captive bred one; even If this means that it will take longer to find the perfect individual.

Thank you for your input regarding terrarium choices, size of tarantula and maintenance etc. I will keep that in mind.

The reason for my thoughts regarding help with “rehousing” it when I get it home, is that I would more likely be able to deal with feeding and cleaning…than the risk of the spider running away/ending up on my hand and so on (especially right from the start, before beginning to get used to having it around). That would mean that I don´t have to start with the most intimidation aspect of keeping a spider (for me…moving it and having the risk of it getting away/climbing on me, is definitely the worst possible start to owning a spider).

/SwedishArachnophobe84

First of all, welcome! :) You have definitely come to the best place to get sound advice. :)

Secondly, I don't think your arachnophobia is as severe as it gets. ;) If you are able to have small ones living in your house and watch videos about them I'm pretty sure you will be able to get over it... with time and patience and a lot of reading and getting to know these amazing creatures. :)
I would recommend watching @Tomoran's videos. By his own admission, he had severe arachnophobia when he first got into tarantulas and even passed out once. And now he's probably one of the most knowledgeable keepers you can find. And his videos, especially his rehousing videos, are not made for views... no bolting, no threat postures to get clicks, just pure education. :)

As for housing, I wouldn't use Exo Terra's glass enclosures for a terrestrial. Because of the front doors, you won't be able to fill up the substrate to a safe level. As said before there shouldn't be more than 1,5x DLS of your T in height (between substrate and the top). I would recommend a RUB (= really useful box) to house a terrestrial spider. They come in lots of different sizes and heights. They are sturdy and have these really secure handles no spider on earth would be able to open. Something to keep your mind at rest at night. ;)

When it comes to beginner species, yes, most of the Aphonopelma, Brachypelma, Grammostola or Tliltocatl species are a good bet, but they all get quite large - not as large as several other genera -, still, maybe a bit intimidating at first. Out of the ones you mentioned in your post I would definitely recommend the Homoeomma chilensis (ex Euathlus sp. red) - if you could find one, that is. :wacky: Yes, they are known to be curious and start to wander around, but they have the sweetest and most docile disposition out of all the Ts. And believe me, they are not fast. They're prone to fast, yes, but they are not fast. ;) Mine made a "runner" when I first got him (well, I was very new as well and didn't know any better), but in hindsight, his "bolting" out of the container was more like "Nope, I don't like it here, just have me have a look around if there's something better. Don't worry, I'll be home at 10 pm". :rofl:
A close second would be Thrixopelma cyaneolum. They also are medium-sized and very, very docile. Mine just love to wave her butt whenever I need to mess with her or her enclosure. Well, she might think she could scare me with that, but in reality, it's just the cutest thing. :kiss:

Just one advice regarding your list... don't get a dwarf species. They are skittish and they bolt, and unlike other Ts they don't bolt in short bursts, no, they run and they don't stop running. :wacky:


This! :)
Thank you, yeah, I figured this would be a good place to hang around and to learn more from.

I have already found a bunch of YouTube channels with tarantula content, where they started out as arachnophobes…so I guess there´s some hope even for someone like me, hehe. I will check out the person you referred to as well, thanks.

Ok, I will look into other options than Exo Terra…I would like to have a “real” terrarium if possible (because it looks a lot nicer than a plastic box) and I like the look of an Exo Terra terrarium and I also like the fact that it has a “real” door instead of those horrible sliding doors. You know…the one´s that get stuck half-open when a tarantula is running towards the opening (like it did once, when I was an intern/trainee in a pet store for a short period, when I was still in school…do I have to say that my anxiety levels where very high until I managed to close it…). Maybe there is something similar but with the possibility of a deeper substrate (that is if using a terrarium doesn´t mean the spider will more likely escape)? However, I will look into plastic boxes as well and search for a “RUB” (and see if that type of box even exist here in Sweden). I have this type of boxes https://www.clasohlson.com/se/Förvaringslåda-SmartStore-Home/p/34-1552-50 (in different sizes for my feeder insects…but I don´t have those to look at, hehe).

Yeah…the “Trinidad dwarf” seems “a bit” to fast for my liking while watching videos of them “zooming” all over the place…but I do like the heart, hehe. Honestly, when I posted my list I already kind of know that it´s not really for me…to much speed in that one…but I wanted to include it anyway because I have had it on my list over potential tarantulas to get for a long time. Two other species of spiders (not tarantulas, but still) I have been thinking about, but almost totally abandoned the thought of is the jumping spiders (hyllus diardi and phidippus regius); I find them “Cute-adjacent” because of their big eyes, they´re a bit “Cartoon-looking” but a big, big, big problem is the fact that they jump…no thanks…

/SwedishArachnophobe84

Hello. Nice long, intresting post. First off, fun with another person from Sweden here on the boards. I am from Öland myself.
Secondly. If you are this arachnophobic it is not a good idea to het a tarantula just now. Getting a tarantula means interactions with it in one or another way. Prodding it out from the shipping container can be extreamly hard i one has arachnophobia i can amagine. And you seems to have severe arachnophobia?. What if the spider bolts, or running up your arm? This can be very dangerous for the spider. When interacting with it, you have to be calm and know what you doing. And if the spider is getting on you. You have to be equally calm. Otherwise you can harm or kill it!
My suggestion to you is simple. Be a member on the fb group "Vi som älskar fågelspindlar" or maybe it is just called "Fågelspindlar"? I am not a member anymore so i dont remember the name. There should be people that live near Örebro there? Try to contact someone near your place and ask if you can visit. Go visit him/her and you can see tarantulas on a distance. And see that person moving them and so on, and you can ask questions ect. Be active on that group for a while and if your arachnophobia beginns to ease, THEN you can think of buying a tarantula

Vänliga hälsningar Johan
Hey there fellow “swede” (yes, yes…I know It´s a form of vegetable…but anyway, hehe)!

Öland is nice, spent a lot of time there during the summers when I was a kid.

Yes, I realize that “interacting” with a tarantula is not going to be “a walk in the park” for me, especially the whole “rehousing/moving it into it´s terrarium-part” which is why I will continue researching and also why I would prefer to get help from someone who´s not afraid of spiders when possibly (unless it comes with a terrarium) getting it home.

This will be a long process…when I got my dubias…well I didn´t exactly enjoy it…and a spider is going to be a lot scarier…so IF (BIG IF) I will get a tarantula; it will be in the future when I have done more research and at least feel a bit less crazy scared than now… if that is even possible, only time will tell.

Right now if a tarantula would “bolt” and run up my arm…well then I would most certainly have a complete panic attack and possible die from fear…and scream, I would do I lot of screaming for sure…and I could not guarantee the safety of the spider in a situation like that…which again is why I really have to think about this idea and do way more research.

Thanks for the suggestions regarding Facebook groups…not that I use Facebook hardly at all…but I might check it out sometime nonetheless.

In the future…If I get that far into my research without completely panicking…I actually know of someone that lives quite close to me that owns a few tarantulas…I might ask to come visit at some point…However I´m not there yet…I will stick to online research for now and maybe buy a book…

/SwedishArachnophobe84
 
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Andrea82

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
3,605
Lots of good advice on the spidery-side of things so I will not repeat all that.
I do however wanted to say that if you are dealing with a real phobia, it might be a good idea to get into touch with a therapist that can help you with this specifically. Exposure therapy is a good option in this case, depending on how severe your fear influences your responses.

Another thing to consider is that there are lots of former arachnophobes keeping Theraphosids who still flinch or have a response when dealing with a 'house spider'. So you could become comfortable when dealing with your own spiders but still freak out when there's a daddy longlegs in your bathroom. ;)
 

aarachnid

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 13, 2019
Messages
147
My arachnophobia wasn't anywhere as bad as yours, but I got into tarantulas because I was researching spiders in an attempt to not freeze every time I saw one on the ground and became enamored instead. Though I agree with the other posters that you should wait awhile to get one, I wasn't completely over my fear when I got my first tarantula (I had to rehearse opening in preparation). Though I logically knew what she was capable of, it took a couple of weeks before I believed she wouldn't/couldn't jump. I used to not handle them out of fear, but now I don't handle them because I love them too much and couldn't deal with them getting injured from a bolt or me dropping them. I know it's obvious, but exposing myself to her every day helped me get over the final hump of my fears. Best of luck to you, I hope your curiousity stays and you're able to have one as a pet!
 

SwedishArachnophobe84

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 4, 2020
Messages
8
Lots of good advice on the spidery-side of things so I will not repeat all that.
I do however wanted to say that if you are dealing with a real phobia, it might be a good idea to get into touch with a therapist that can help you with this specifically. Exposure therapy is a good option in this case, depending on how severe your fear influences your responses.

Another thing to consider is that there are lots of former arachnophobes keeping Theraphosids who still flinch or have a response when dealing with a 'house spider'. So you could become comfortable when dealing with your own spiders but still freak out when there's a daddy longlegs in your bathroom. ;)
Thank you for your advice, I might look into the possibility of trying that kind of therapy at some point. Regarding the possibility of being ok with a “pet spider” and still freaking out over the surprising visit from a wild spider …I might still want to take that risk. I find tarantulas very interesting despite my phobia…but only time will tell…

/SwedishArachnophobe84

My arachnophobia wasn't anywhere as bad as yours, but I got into tarantulas because I was researching spiders in an attempt to not freeze every time I saw one on the ground and became enamored instead. Though I agree with the other posters that you should wait awhile to get one, I wasn't completely over my fear when I got my first tarantula (I had to rehearse opening in preparation). Though I logically knew what she was capable of, it took a couple of weeks before I believed she wouldn't/couldn't jump. I used to not handle them out of fear, but now I don't handle them because I love them too much and couldn't deal with them getting injured from a bolt or me dropping them. I know it's obvious, but exposing myself to her every day helped me get over the final hump of my fears. Best of luck to you, I hope your curiousity stays and you're able to have one as a pet!
Thank you so much for your input. Good to hear from a fellow arachnophobe (even better from one that used to be...that got "cured" by their pet). My fascination and interest… are still very much pushing me towards getting a tarantula (or who knows, two?) in the future.

/SwedishArachnophobe84

Thank you all so much for your help and ideas etc. It´s been a great help in continuing my research. I still feel as though this might be a possibility in the future, but I will by no means rush in to anything.

I did take a very tiny babystep a couple of weeks ago. I was getting my rabbit neutered and the vet clinic is next door to a pet store (the clinic is sort of like a part of the store, you pay for the vet visit in the store etc.). While waiting for him to be ready to go home; I actually went down stairs to their “reptile room”.

They also sell a few species of tarantulas and I figured I could see how “panicked” I would feel looking at them…you know “up close” (not on Youtube). I have been that close to tarantulas before (as mentioned before as an intern/trainee) …but this time I actually felt calmer. I looked at the different species and didn´t feel like running back upstairs immediately. Progress I guess…however I didn´t have to “handle” or open the terrariums etc. so hard to know how calm I would feel in such a situation. Still…a small victory, I guess.

/SwedishArachnophobe84
 
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mjzheng

Arachnosquire
Active Member
Joined
Aug 30, 2019
Messages
61
I want a 2 year update go this thread with a video of your whole collection lol. You're already this fascinated while terrified , you're going to get sucked into this hobby 😁😁😁
 

SwedishArachnophobe84

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 4, 2020
Messages
8
I want a 2 year update go this thread with a video of your whole collection lol. You're already this fascinated while terrified , you're going to get sucked into this hobby 😁😁😁
Haha, I don´t know about that…but I guess you should never say never 😊

/SwedishArachnophobe84
 

cold blood

Moderator
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Messages
11,549
I have seen a lot of people using different types of plastic boxes etc. But I need it to be totally escape proof! How
Any of the commonly used enclosures are escape proof....99% of all escapes are the result of operator error....that is, leaving it open.
is the best enclosure type; a
There is no one best enclosure. Dont get hung up on any one particular choice.
smaller? If using one of the Exo Terra terrariums; does
Aviod these....these, and ANY remotely tall enclosure with front opening doors is an arboreal enclosure, as those doors will prevent the addition of enough substrate to create a safe home. You dont want to do anything to encourage a terrestrial to climb, because given the opportunity, they will.
Are this the worst idea ever
Depends on you, really.
Is there any particular species that you would like to recomme
Being a former arachnophobe myself, I will tell you the best way to get over it is to be patient, and get a species that is not prone to bolting moving or threat posturing much at all. For this reason I always suggest a common rose hair. Their sedentary nature makes them very easy to work around as they tend to be about as jumpy as a baked potato.

After a while you will begin to realize you have nothing to fear. They also have exceedingly low food requirements and ridiculously simple care....they also tend not to ever hide...so you never have to worry about where it is and barely ever even need to open the enclosure at all aside from filling a water dish....and with many tops, you don't even need to open the enclosure to add water.

An adult chalcodes would probably be a decent choice as well as they share many characteristics with the rose hairs.

Many of the species suggested are great for beginners, but many tend to move around a lot more, or hide more....better for the enthusiastic new owner than an arachnophobe trying to overcome anxiety.
How big does it have to be to be able to sex it? Are there any difference regarding
Coming from your perspective, sex is totally and completely irrelevant, aside from not wanting a mature male to start with (theyre roamers) Even a sub adult male rose hair could be with you 10 years though...and 4-6 before even maturing.

If you did end up with a male, it wouldnt be an issue and wouldnt be something that could be needing care for the next 30 or 40 years like a female might....what if you find its ultimately not the hobby for you?
I’m sensitive/allergic to wasps/bees…can this cause a problem with owning a spide
Nope...tarantula venom isnt like that.

Theres no reason to ever expect to take a bite...its incredibly easy to be smarter than a spider....keep your fingers away and you wont get bit, its that easy....especially considering thats the last place your hands will be anyway...right.
hairs? I don´t even want to think about getting bitten, the thought of a spider that bites…not a pleasant thought…being bitten by an eight legged “monster” is not som
Reactions from hairs come through exposure...get a rose hair...they basically never flick hairs. ..so this would actually be a complete non-issue.
When it comes to the question you had about “rehousing” the spider when I (in case I decide to get one) first bring it home. I´m not 100% sure about how to manage this yet but I have thought about this and I have a few possible options in mind. The
You could simply open the cup in its enclosure and retrieve the empty cup when it walks out in time...never be in a hurry.

If you needed to move it or re house it, its as simple as putting a cup over it and ushering it in with a long tool, like a tweezers or even a straw....theres no reason to ever need to make contact.

Over coming the fear is all about patience and your personal desire to over come an irrational fear.

And dont be in any hurry to jump right in. Best of luck with whatever you choose to do.
 
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