Search for A. Behlei is over

Brandon

Arachnobaron
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Jul 19, 2002
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This past weekend I was presented with the opportunity to some great field collecting for 3 days. Myself as well as a couple of good friends toured all over northern and central Arizona in search of some of its rarer animals. Among the animals we caught were, Collard Lizards, Spiny Tailed Lizards, Centruroides exilicauda girshi, Aphonopelma chalcodes, Aphonopelma paloma (worlds smallest tarantula), and Aphonopelma behlei. For the past 3 years (ever since I started field collecting) I have been searching for A. behlei. Thanks to some great tips from a friend I was able to locate and capture 3 of them. Even though we were in the middle of what appeared to be a colony 3 was all that could be found. We flipped hundreds of rocks, and I discovered what others said about them is true, they are scarce at best. Non-the less I am very excited, I learned many new techniques for field collecting. My fingers are raw from the flipping and I am sun Burnt but I am very self satisfied.

Sincerely,

Brandon
 

nemesis6sic6

Arachnoangel
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cool

I never seen that species
is it like most of the Aphonopelma colors?
well um can you show a pic? of it. I'm really curious
 

DiStUrBeD-OnE

Arachnoknight
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Jan 23, 2003
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Im just suprized anything can live out here... i complain when we dont have air conditioning when were driving in the desert ;P
Very nice finds brandon :D


Ian
 

Brandon

Arachnobaron
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This species is found up in the pines so the weather was very very nice

nemesis6sic6,
No they do not look like most other Aphonopelmas, as you can see the blue green to almost black. Very gorgious.

Sincerely,

Brandon
 

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nemesis6sic6

Arachnoangel
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wow thats nice

wow that's nice
yeah it looks very pretty
that's all i have to say
 

Alias

Arachnosquire
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smallest tarantula in the world? very self-confident statement...how big is that Aphonopelma paloma?
here live Atypus species with adult size 2 centimeter (4/5 inch)..I believe even smaller species exist..
 

Nemesis

Arachnosquire
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Ultimately Cool!!!!!

Once again, I am excedingly jealous!!!! What I wouldn't give to go T hunting in AZ! I've mentioned before that my parents and sibs are there, and they haven't the slightest interest. My Mom and Dad are actually camping at MT. Lemon (outside Tuscon) this weekend and I Have begged them to do some collecting for me. Not a chance! My Dad just says the only "collecting" he'll be doing is on the sole of his boot.....Neanderthal (sp)=D Sigh.....maybe next year. Until then I will live vicariously through ya'll.

Kelly O
 

Brandon

Arachnobaron
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Alias,
Yes im sure, to date its the smallest recorded tarantulas, adualt females run around 3/5 of an inch. maybe up to 4/5. they are awsome looking.

Sincerely,

Brandon
 

dennis

Arachnodemon
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Originally posted by Brandon
Yes im sure, to date its the smallest recorded tarantulas, adualt females run around 3/5 of an inch. maybe up to 4/5. they are
I'm reading my Terrarium Encyclopedia right now, and I see a spider which doesn't get bigger then 1 cm, that would be 2/5 inch. THe species name is Cyriocosmus elegans.
They are a burrowing species that can be found in Bolivia, Brazil, Trinidad and Venezuela.


Dennis
 

skadiwolf

Arachnolord
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May 6, 2003
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wow that's really neat. are they hard to find in the industry as well as in the wild?

what are their traits/personalities, etc? how large do they normally get as adults?

i'd love any information you can give us. that is indeed a lovely T. good work! the sunburn will fade but the memories and your new pets won't! :D
 

Alias

Arachnosquire
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dennie, and what about that cyriocosmus elegans, that dennie mentioned? and anyway, I still believe that there must be something even smaller :)
btw, Im just looking at the Rick Wests photo and this species looks wonderful! :) like microscopic mix of c. fasciatum, b. vagans and b. emilia :)

http://www.birdspiders.com/archive/1/0037.htm

and this is that Atypus spp., living in central Europe.. note the huge chelicerae compared to size of carapace..

http://212.67.66.237/zp/chruzemi/cr2_foto/fot76-3.jpg
 

Alias

Arachnosquire
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it belongs to suborder Orthognatha, it has all the tarantula signs, like four booklungs etc...however, it looks atypical, thats why is this genus called ATYPUS..
 
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sunnymarcie

Celestial Spider
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Dennis, it sure does not look like a T to me either.
Such short legs too.

Nice T's and nice pictures too:)
 

Alias

Arachnosquire
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size of legs really doesnt matter at all :). the major points are:
-chelicerae opening vertically, not horizontally
-four booklungs

the overall look is irellevant...a whale also doesnt look like a mammal, for example..maybe stupid example, ok :)

it depends on definition of "T"

Tarantula=just members of family Theraposidae

or

Tarantula=all members of suborder Orthognatha, as opposed to suborder Labidognatha - true spiders.
so members of families Theraposidae,Ctenizidae, Atypidae, and so on are Tarantulas

or

Tarantula=anything what I call tarantula, and dont dare to argue with me :D



this debate is pointless, I know :) I started it just because I am curious and I doubt the primacy of Aphonopelma paloma..
 

WithCerberus

Arachnoknight
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May 31, 2003
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259
You guys should check out Microhexura montivaga

M. montivaga is a small diplurid spider that only gets .1 to .15 inches. They are tiny. While it is not a tarantula it is a mygalomorph.
Sorry for posting on such an old thread..... 8)

Bobby
 

Tony

Arachno-pragmatarian
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Atypus affinis, belongs to Atypidae, subfamily of the Mygalomorphae.

SO its NOT in the theraphosid family? Its just a plain old mygale? tarantulas as a group are from the theraphosid family...
and all this 3/5 4/5 stuff, is that body length or legspan?

Tony
 

WithCerberus

Arachnoknight
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In my post the .1-.15 inches refers to body length. I believe the others refer to body length also. And yes not all mygalomorphs are tarantulas.
 
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