Scorpion Heating

42LegAPede

Arachnosquire
Joined
Feb 14, 2016
Messages
61
I have two questions about scorpion heating and I think that scorpion heating is a very complex subject to research (at least for me). I would like to see how to best heat scorpions to their desired temperature.

1. Do you need heating for scorpions?

2. How would one heat multiple scorpion enclosures without overheating them?
 

ButhidaeBomb

Cant Re-Member
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 1, 2006
Messages
168
it can be a little tricky. always try to use a thermostat if you are using some sort of direct heat (other than ambient room temp/heat).
I would ay this:
1) make the enclosure large enough to allow for a temperature gradient (hot on one end, cooler on other).
2) use a "hot box" enclosure that will allow you to monitor the temps at exactly what you set them at. I actually have a DIY in the vivarium section of this site. this basically makes a ambient temperature controlled box for you.
3) make your entire room the appropriate heat and keep it that way.

I am assuming you are trying to heat multiple small enclosure (like a tackle box or bead box type container). if so, the above methods are about all you have. its a lot tougher to try to create the right temps for really small enclosures without using the methods above. hope this helps you. someone may come along with some other ideas that I haven't thought of. just keep in mind that it is highly advised that you use a good thermostat for heating...specially on smaller enclosures because the risk of over heating is a lot greater the smaller the enclosure.
 

shining

Arachnodemon
Joined
Jul 15, 2011
Messages
755
What's the ambient temperature of your room? What species too?
 

42LegAPede

Arachnosquire
Joined
Feb 14, 2016
Messages
61
What's the ambient temperature of your room? What species too?
My room is about 70*f/21*c. I am planning on getting most of the readily available species including flat rocks, forest scorpions, and some from the genus Pandinus. I also am looking into Hottentotta trilineatus.

it can be a little tricky. always try to use a thermostat if you are using some sort of direct heat (other than ambient room temp/heat).
I would ay this:
1) make the enclosure large enough to allow for a temperature gradient (hot on one end, cooler on other).
2) use a "hot box" enclosure that will allow you to monitor the temps at exactly what you set them at. I actually have a DIY in the vivarium section of this site. this basically makes a ambient temperature controlled box for you.
3) make your entire room the appropriate heat and keep it that way.

I am assuming you are trying to heat multiple small enclosure (like a tackle box or bead box type container). if so, the above methods are about all you have. its a lot tougher to try to create the right temps for really small enclosures without using the methods above. hope this helps you. someone may come along with some other ideas that I haven't thought of. just keep in mind that it is highly advised that you use a good thermostat for heating...specially on smaller enclosures because the risk of over heating is a lot greater the smaller the enclosure.
I have seen your hot box and I am very impressed with what you have done; but I don't think that is an option for me. I am grateful for such a detailed response though.
 

ButhidaeBomb

Cant Re-Member
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 1, 2006
Messages
168
I wish the hot box would work out for everyone because it is really handy.
70F, as you stated, is a little too cold. that would be ok for night time temps but that wont cut it for daytime. ....specially for the hottentotta you mentioned. if you cant use a hot box, you may have to dig deep into your brain to figure out what to do.

p.s. I picked up a few H. hottentotta today. they used to be pretty easy to get but now seems a little tougher to find. same goes for h. trilineatus.
 

42LegAPede

Arachnosquire
Joined
Feb 14, 2016
Messages
61
I wish the hot box would work out for everyone because it is really handy.
70F, as you stated, is a little too cold. that would be ok for night time temps but that wont cut it for daytime. ....specially for the hottentotta you mentioned. if you cant use a hot box, you may have to dig deep into your brain to figure out what to do.

p.s. I picked up a few H. hottentotta today. they used to be pretty easy to get but now seems a little tougher to find. same goes for h. trilineatus.
What temp would be best for most scorpions? I am thinking of getting a heater that will heat the entire room.
 

ButhidaeBomb

Cant Re-Member
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 1, 2006
Messages
168
that really depends on the species. going by the genus name can get you in the area as well but it wont be precise to the species.
I would say a good overall temp would be 83F daytime, 73F night time. again though, this is just a general idea to keep them from getting too cold or too hot. cold is not good but too much heat is fatal pretty quick.
 

darkness975

dream reaper
Arachnosupporter +
Joined
Aug 31, 2012
Messages
3,906
Most species are going to need to be on the warmer side like previously stated. But I keep my H. arizonensis at room temp (somewhere between 68 - 72 F) in the winter with no issues. They go into diapause anyway.

Best method of heating is ambient room temperature to avoid drying them out too badly.
 
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